July 20, 2017

Archives for July 21, 2016

Hon. Daniel B. Petre to Retire from Ninth Judicial District Court

Petre (Formatted)On Wednesday, July 20, 2016, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced the retirement of Hon. Daniel Petre from the Ninth Judicial District Court, effective October 1, 2016. Judge Petre was appointed to the bench in 2002. Prior to his appointment, he was a District Court Magistrate in the Ninth Judicial District and a Division 5 Water Referee. He was in private practice for 24 years before working as a magistrate and water referee. He received his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and his law degree from Southern Methodist University Law School.

Applications are now being accepted for the upcoming vacancy. Eligible applicants must be qualified electors of the Ninth Judicial District and must have been admitted to practice law in Colorado for five years. Application forms are available from the State Judicial website or from the ex officio chair of the Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission, Justice Allison Eid. Applications must be received no later than 4 p.m. on August 31, 2016; anyone wishing to nominate another must do so no later than August 24, 2016.

For more information about the vacancy, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Notice-Prejudice Rule Applies Where Claim Filed with Insurance Company After Contractual Period

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in MarkWest Energy Partners, L.P. v. Zurich American Insurance Co. on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Insurance—Notice-Prejudice Rule—Occurrence Liability Policy.

MarkWest Energy Partners, L.P. (MarkWest), a natural gas company, procured from Zurich American Insurance Company (Zurich) a commercial general liability policy (the policy) with a limited pollution liability endorsement (the endorsement), covering “incidents” occurring between November 1, 2012, and November 1, 2013. On November 4, 2012, MarkWest was constructing a pipeline when a chemical used in the drilling process escaped the drilling area, thereby contaminating the surrounding area. MarkWest immediately reported the incident to local environmental officials, who approved a chemical cleanup protocol and confirmed that cleanup had been successfully completed in February 2013. On March 28, 2013, MarkWest notified Zurich of the contamination and filed an associated claim. Zurich denied the claim because MarkWest had failed to provide notice within 60 days of the incident, as required by the endorsement. MarkWest filed an action for damages, and the district court granted Zurich’s motion for summary judgment.

On appeal, MarkWest contended that the notice-prejudice rule applied and the district court erred in granting Zurich’s motion for summary judgment. Colorado’s notice-prejudice rule applies even where, as here, the notice requirement is a condition precedent to coverage under an occurrence liability policy. Therefore, unless Zurich can show that its ability to investigate the occurrence or defend against a claim was prejudiced by MarkWest’s late notice, the court cannot deny a claim based solely on a failure to strictly comply with the notice provision. Because the district court concluded otherwise, its decision was reversed and the case was remanded for further proceedings.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Tender of Funds in Satisfaction of Lien Before Redemption Period Must Be Accepted by Creditor

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Mortgage Investment Enterprises, LLC v. Oakwood Holdings, LLC on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Foreclosure—Lien—Redemption.

The debtors purchased the property at issue and subsequently defaulted on their obligation to pay monthly fees to the Kimblewyck Village Owners Association (Kimblewyck). Kimblewyck filed a lien against the property. The property was also encumbered by (1) a lien filed by the Fox Run Owners Association and (2) two judgments entered in favor of Community Management Association, Inc. (CMA). Kimblewyck obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure. Mortgage Investments Enterprises LLC (Mortgage Investments) was the successful bidder at the foreclosure sale. On the day before the foreclosure sale, Oakwood Holdings, LLC (Oakwood) purchased the Fox Run lien and both CMA judgments. Oakwood subsequently filed notices of intent to redeem the Fox Run lien and one of the CMA judgments. Mortgage Investments tendered, on behalf of the debtor, pursuant to a valid power of attorney, lien satisfaction payments to Oakwood. Although Oakwood’s period to redeem had not yet begun, it refused to accept the payments. Mortgage Investments filed a complaint for a declaratory judgment that Oakwood was required to accept Mortgage Investments’ tenders on behalf of the debtor. Oakwood subsequently redeemed the property, and the district court granted Oakwood’s motion for summary judgment.

On appeal, Mortgage Investments argued that the district court erred in concluding that Oakwood had no duty to accept tender of payment in satisfaction of its liens. Prior to the start of Oakwood’s period to redeem and before it tendered redemption funds, Oakwood had a duty to accept Mortgage Investments’ tender of payment, on behalf of the debtor, in satisfaction of the lien Oakwood sought to redeem. The district court’s judgment was reversed and the case was remanded with directions to enter summary judgment in favor of Mortgage Investments.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Proof of Alleged Abuse Not Required Where Child Adjudicated Dependent Based on Lack of Parental Care

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of L.K. on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Dependency and Neglect—Sexual Abuse—Polygraph Examination—Treatment Plan—Testimony—Evidence—Attorney Fees—Discovery Violations—Sovereign Immunity.

L.K. alleged sexual abuse by her father, C.K. Although C.K. denied the allegations, he stipulated that L.K. was dependent and neglected because she lacked proper parental care. The court accepted his admission and adjudicated L.K. dependent and neglected. The Moffat County Department of Social Services (MCDSS) devised a treatment plan for C.K., which required, among other things, that C.K. take a polygraph examination as part of denier’s treatment. Moffat later moved to terminate C.K.’s parental rights. Among other things, the court found that C.K. had been referred for a polygraph examination but did not appear for it, and it granted the termination motion, citing C.K.’s failure to successfully complete treatment designed to address the allegations of sexual misbehavior with L.K. as sufficient evidence that he was unable or unwilling to provide nurturing and safe parenting to adequately address her needs.

On appeal, C.K. contended that the trial court committed reversible error by considering the denier’s treatment polygraph examination as evidence supporting its determination that he failed to successfully complete his treatment plan. He did not dispute either that his treatment plan required him to participate in denier’s treatment or that a polygraph examination was required in denier’s treatment. For these reasons, the court properly admitted evidence of efforts to schedule an appointment for a polygraph examination and evidence that C.K. did not keep the appointment, and the court did not err in considering this evidence in terminating C.K.’s parental rights.

Next, C.K. contended that MCDSS had the burden to prove by clear and convincing evidence that his parental rights should be terminated, but the trial court erred by unfairly shifting the burden of proof to him when he decided not to testify in the termination hearing. When C.K. failed to present evidence, the court did not improperly shift the burden of proof, infringe on his privilege against self-incrimination, or draw impermissible adverse inferences.

Finally, C.K. contended that MCDSS did not prove its case by clear and convincing evidence, asserting the absence of such evidence that he had sexually abused L.K., which was the basis for the petition in dependency and neglect. However, the factual basis for adjudicating L.K. dependent and neglected had already been established, and MCDSS’s burden was to prove the criteria for termination, including C.K.’s failure to comply with his treatment plan. The Court of Appeals rejected the contention that the evidence was insufficient to support the judgment.

On cross-appeal, MCDSS contended that the trial court erred in assessing attorney fees against it for discovery violations. Sovereign immunity precludes orders assessing attorney fees against a governmental entity for discovery violations.

The judgment was affirmed and the sanctions order was reversed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/20/2016

On Wednesday, July 20, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and seven unpublished opinions.

Antonio v. Lynch

Feldt v. Heritage Homes of Nebraska, Inc.

United States v. Rogers

United States v. Lewis

United States v. Amador-Beltran

Ray v. Colvin

Williams v. McKee

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.