October 20, 2017

Colorado Court of Appeals: District Court Within Statutory Authority to Sua Sponte Set Sentencing Hearing

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Reyes on Thursday, June 30, 2016.

Revocation of Probation—Resentencing—Hearing—Separation of Powers—Sua Sponte—Equal Protection—Discretion.

Reyes was serving a sentence. A revocation of probation complaint was filed, Reyes entered into a plea agreement, and the district court resentenced him to four years in community corrections. Reyes was subsequently terminated from the community corrections program for violating its policies. The court held a resentencing hearing sua sponte and resentenced Reyes to five years in the custody of the Department of Corrections.

On appeal, Reyes contended that the court lacked the statutory authority to set a resentencing hearing without a request from one of the parties. The district court can increase an offender’s sentence as long as it holds a resentencing hearing, and there is no statutory requirement that one of the parties must request that hearing.

Reyes also contended that the sua sponte hearing violated separation of powers because the prosecutor did not request the hearing. Discretion to request a resentencing hearing does not lie solely with the prosecutor, and the district court did not violate separation of powers principles.

Additionally, Reyes argued that the court violated his equal protection right by singling him out from other defendants and setting a resentencing hearing just because it disagreed with the prior judge’s four-year sentence. The Court of Appeals found that the court’s decision to set a resentencing hearing was rationally related to a legitimate governmental objective and did not violate Reyes’s right to equal protection.

Finally, Reyes asserted that even if the court did not violate his equal protection right, it abused its discretion by setting the resentencing hearing because its decision was manifestly arbitrary and abrogated the previous judge’s sentence, which was the law of the case. Here, the court’s decision to set a hearing was rationally based on Reyes’ particular circumstances, and the court did not abuse its discretion.

The five-year sentence was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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