June 24, 2017

Archives for September 27, 2016

Colorado Court of Appeals: City Waived Immunity by Failing to Maintain Road

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Dennis v. City & County of Denver on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Colorado Governmental Immunity Act—Deteriorated Roadway—Unreasonable Risk to Health or Safety of Public.

Heyboer sustained injuries as a passenger on a motorcycle that could not timely brake when a car unexpectedly turned left in front of it. Dennis, as conservator and guardian for Heyboer, brought this negligence and premises liability action against the City and County of Denver (City). The complaint alleged that (1) the City had a duty to maintain the roadway free from dangerous conditions that physically interfered with the movement of traffic, (2) it breached that duty by allowing the roadway to fall into disrepair, (3) it knew of the deteriorated state of the road from prior complaints, and (4) Heyboer’s injuries resulted from the City’s breach of its duty of care.

The City moved to dismiss under C.R.C.P. 12(b)(1), asserting immunity and denying the allegations. The district court conducted a hearing and granted the City’s motion.

On appeal, Heyboer argued that she satisfied her burden of proving an unreasonable risk to the health or safety of the public; she contended that the court erred in finding no evidence of an unreasonable risk and, by doing so, erred as a matter of law in refusing to find a waiver of immunity. Both the record and the court’s factual findings demonstrated that the City failed to maintain the road as required by C.R.S. § 24-10-103(2.5), thereby creating an unreasonable risk to the health or safety of the public. The court of appeals concluded that the district court clearly erred in its factual finding that the record contained no evidence of an unreasonable risk to the health and safety of the public. This also leads to the conclusion that it was error to find, as a matter of law, that there was no waiver of immunity under the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act.

The judgment was reversed and the case was remanded for reinstatement of the complaint.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Restitution Does Not Create a Debtor-Creditor Relationship with Victim

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Foos on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Bankruptcy—Discharge ofRestitution Order—Bad Faith.

In 2012, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court discharged Foos’s debts against the three victims in this case. Prior to his bankruptcy proceedings, Foos owed money to these victims. In 2013, Foos was charged with two counts of felony theft and one count of defrauding a secured creditor. Foos resolved these charges by pleading guilty to the charge of defrauding a secured creditor in exchange for dismissal of the other two counts. He stipulated to a deferred judgment and sentence with a requirement for full restitution.

On appeal, Foos argued that it was error to order him to pay restitution because he discharged his debts in bankruptcy before the charges were filed against him. C.R.S. § 18-1.3-603(4)(d) precludes the discharge of restitution orders in bankruptcy, and restitution serves a different purpose than bankruptcy. Accordingly, the district court did not err in ordering Foos to pay restitution.

Foos also argued that he was prosecuted in bad faith. The court of appeals noted that although the original prosecutor had a “cozy relationship” with Foos’s creditors, she was replaced with a special prosecutor who had no personal connection to the case and who made an independent decision to move forward with the prosecution. Moreover, Foos waived his right to challenge the validity of the charges by pleading guilty.

Finally, Foos argued that he was ordered to pay restitution to a listed victim in a theft count that was dismissed as part of the plea agreement. Colorado case law is clear that, for purposes of restitution, a victim does not have to be one of the named victims of a conviction.

The order was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Defendant’s Wife Can Initiate Police Interview After Invocation of Right to Counsel

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Cardman on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Sexual Assault—Custodial Interrogation—Miranda—Right to Counsel—Third Party.

The police executed a search warrant on defendant’s home after the victim reported that defendant had sexually assaulted her. During the search, they recovered a weapon, and defendant was arrested on the charge of possession of a weapon by a previous offender. Defendant promptly exercised his rights to remain silent and to counsel, and the police ceased questioning. Two days later, a police detective conducted another interview of defendant during which defendant admitted to three instances of sexual contact with the victim. An audio recording of defendant’s second police interview was admitted at trial. Defendant was convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault on a child.

On appeal, defendant contended that the district court erred by not suppressing statements he made during his second custodial interrogation because he had previously invoked his right to counsel and did not himself reinitiate communication with the police. To establish that a suspect has reinitiated discussions with the police after previously invoking his right to counsel, the prosecution must show that (1) the police reasonably believed that the suspect directed a third party to inform them that he wanted to have “a generalized discussion about the investigation,” and (2) the police confirmed with the suspect that he had so indicated. Here, the detective’s testimony was clear that defendant’s wife informed him that defendant had questions about the investigation. Further, the detective knew the caseworker had also been in contact with defendant after the first interview, and she also informed him that both defendant and his wife had questions about the investigation. The detective then called defendant at the jail and confirmed that defendant desired to speak with him. Therefore, defendant “adequately evinced a willingness and a desire to” reinitiate communication with the police through a third party and there was no error in admitting his inculpatory statements.

Defendant also contended that the statements he made in the second interview were not voluntary and that the court erred in not holding a hearing on the issue of voluntariness. The court of appeals did not reach the merits of this issue because defendant moved to suppress the statements solely on reinitiation grounds and thus waived the voluntariness claims.

Defendant also argued that reversal is required because the recording of the interview admitted at trial included the detective’s assertions that he believed the victim and did not believe defendant’s denials of the victim’s allegations, and because the detective testified that he did not believe defendant. The court discerned no plain error in the admission of this evidence.

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: District Court Lacked Authority to Rule on People’s Motion

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Wood on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Felony Murder—Second Degree Murder—Habeas Corpus Petition—State District Court—Federal Court—Jurisdiction.

In 1986, while attempting to rob a pizza delivery store, Wood shot and killed an assistant store manager. Wood was convicted of felony murder, second degree murder, aggravated robbery, and menacing. For the past 10 years, Wood has sought to remove his felony murder conviction. The Tenth Circuit conditionally granted Wood’s habeas corpus petition, noting that his felony murder conviction would be vacated unless a state court acted within a reasonable time to vacate either his felony murder conviction or his second degree murder conviction. Thereafter, the state district court granted the People’s request to vacate the second degree murder conviction, rather than the felony murder conviction.

On appeal, Wood contended that the People did not have authority to request that the state district court vacate his second degree murder conviction, nor did the court have the jurisdiction or authority to do so. The People had the authority to file their request to notify the state district court of the federal district court’s conditional grant of habeas corpus relief and request that the state court vacate the conviction. Though the district court had subject matter jurisdiction, it did not have the authority to vacate Wood’s second degree murder conviction. The conditional grants of habeas corpus relief by the Tenth Circuit and the federal district court did not require the state district court to act. If it did nothing, Wood’s mittimus would be corrected by the federal district court removing his felony murder conviction and the double jeopardy violations would be remedied. Accordingly, the state district court’s order was vacated, and the case was remanded with instructions for the state district court to vacate Wood’s felony murder conviction and correct the mittimus accordingly, leaving in place the second degree murder, aggravated robbery, and menacing convictions.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 9/26/2016

On Monday, September 26, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and three unpublished opinions.

Walker v. Balco, Inc.

Drennan v. Pryor

Carbajal v. Swan

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.