April 26, 2017

Colorado Court of Appeals: Restitution Does Not Create a Debtor-Creditor Relationship with Victim

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Foos on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Bankruptcy—Discharge ofRestitution Order—Bad Faith.

In 2012, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court discharged Foos’s debts against the three victims in this case. Prior to his bankruptcy proceedings, Foos owed money to these victims. In 2013, Foos was charged with two counts of felony theft and one count of defrauding a secured creditor. Foos resolved these charges by pleading guilty to the charge of defrauding a secured creditor in exchange for dismissal of the other two counts. He stipulated to a deferred judgment and sentence with a requirement for full restitution.

On appeal, Foos argued that it was error to order him to pay restitution because he discharged his debts in bankruptcy before the charges were filed against him. C.R.S. § 18-1.3-603(4)(d) precludes the discharge of restitution orders in bankruptcy, and restitution serves a different purpose than bankruptcy. Accordingly, the district court did not err in ordering Foos to pay restitution.

Foos also argued that he was prosecuted in bad faith. The court of appeals noted that although the original prosecutor had a “cozy relationship” with Foos’s creditors, she was replaced with a special prosecutor who had no personal connection to the case and who made an independent decision to move forward with the prosecution. Moreover, Foos waived his right to challenge the validity of the charges by pleading guilty.

Finally, Foos argued that he was ordered to pay restitution to a listed victim in a theft count that was dismissed as part of the plea agreement. Colorado case law is clear that, for purposes of restitution, a victim does not have to be one of the named victims of a conviction.

The order was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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