August 20, 2017

Archives for March 31, 2017

Colorado Court of Appeals: Dependency and Neglect Court Should Have Followed ICWA’s Notice Requirements

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of L.L. on Thursday, March 30, 2017.

Dependency and NeglectIndian Child Welfare ActNoticeBurden of Proof.

In this dependency and neglect case concerning L.L., his mother, A.T., told the juvenile court at a shelter hearing that she had possible Apache Native American ancestry. Later, A.T. filed written information that included tribal card numbers and roll numbers. The Denver Department of Human Services (Department) did not send notice of the proceedings to any of the Apache Tribes. A.T. again stated that she had Indian heritage at a pretrial hearing, but the juvenile court did not address whether the Department used due diligence to identify and work with an Apache Tribe to verify whether L.L. is a member or is eligible for tribal membership. The court also did not treat L.L. as an Indian child pending verification from the tribe. Following a jury verdict, the court adjudicated L.L. dependent and neglected.

On appeal, A.T. contended that the order should be reversed because the Department did not comply with the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) notice requirements. First, when there is “reason to know” the child is an Indian child, the juvenile court must ensure that the Department sends notice to any identified Indian Tribe. Second, the court must “[t]reat the child as an Indian child, unless and until it is determined on the record that the child does not meet the definition of an ‘Indian child.’” Here, the Department did not meet its obligation to provide notice of the proceedings to any of the Apache Tribes. The juvenile court did not address whether the Department used due diligence to identify and work with an Apache Tribe to verify whether L.L. was a member or was eligible for membership and did not treat L.L. as an Indian child pending the Tribes’ verification.

A.T. also contended that the juvenile court violated ICWA by not requiring the jury to base its findings on a heightened clear and convincing evidentiary standard. There is no language in ICWA or associated rules or guidelines that indicates a heightened burden of proof for the adjudicatory hearing in a dependency and neglect proceeding. Thus, the state is only required to prove the allegations in the petition by a preponderance of the evidence in all adjudications, whether involving Indian or non-Indian children. The juvenile court did not err when it instructed the jury regarding the Department’s burden of proof.

The judgment was reversed and the case was remanded with directions.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Oil and Gas Commission Has Authority to Issue Rule at Petitioner’s Request

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Martinez v. Colorado Oil and Gas Commission on Thursday, March 23, 2017.

Oil and Gas Conservation ActColorado Oil and Gas Conservation CommissionPublic Health and Safety.

Petitioners filed a petition for rulemaking pursuant to the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission’s Rule 529(b). Petitioners proposed a rule requesting that the Commission not issue permits for drilling oil and gas wells unless certain conditions were met to demonstrate that the drilling would not have specified adverse effects. The Commission ultimately denied the petition, concluding that (1) the proposed rule mandated action that exceeded the Commission’s statutory authority; (2) the requested third-party review contradicted the Commission’s nondelegable duty to promulgate rules; and (3) the public trust doctrine, which petitioners relied on to support their request, has been expressly rejected in Colorado. The district court affirmed the Commission’s order after concluding that the Commission rationally decided to deny the petition after considering input from stakeholders on both sides of the fracking issue in accordance with the Oil and Gas Conservation Act’s requirement of a balance between the development of oil and gas resources and the protection of public health, safety, and welfare.

On appeal, petitioners contended that the district court and the Commission erred in interpreting the Act. The Colorado Court of Appeals determined that the plain meaning of the statutory language indicates that fostering balanced development, production, and use of natural resources is in the public interest when that development is completed subject to the protection of public health, safety, and welfare. Therefore, the Commission erred in interpreting C.R.S. § 34-60-102(1)(a)(I) as requiring a balance between development and public health, safety, and welfare.

The district court’s and Commission’s orders were reversed and the case was remanded for further proceedings.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 3/30/2017

On Thursday, March 30, 2017, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued one published opinion and nine unpublished opinions.

Singh v. Sessions

Gabriel v. United States

Horner v. Bryant

United States v. Perez

Poff v. State of Oklahoma

United States v. Velarde

United States v. Porter

Gaedeke Holdings VII Ltd. v. Baker

Madden v. Madden

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.