September 21, 2017

Colorado Court of Appeals: Petition for Mandamus Relief Should Have Been Transferred to Executive Director

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Gandy v. Raemisch on Thursday, August 10, 2017.

C.R.C.P. 106—Dismissal—Transfer of Canadian Prisoner to Canada to Serve Life Sentence—Mandamus Relief.

Gandy is a Canadian citizen serving a habitual criminal life sentence in the custody of the Colorado Department of Corrections (DOC). Gandy applied numerous times to DOC to be transferred to serve the remainder of his sentence in the Canadian penal system. In 2016, the DOC prisons director (director) denied Gandy’s 2015 application in writing. The director stated that under DOC Administrative Regulation 550-05, Gandy would be eligible to reapply in two years. The director did not forward Gandy’s application to DOC’s executive director.

Gandy filed a complaint in district court seeking mandamus relief under C.R.C.P. 106, requesting the court to direct DOC to “process and submit” his application for transfer to the U.S. Department of Justice and asking for nominal punitive damages for alleged violations of his constitutional rights. The court granted defendants’ motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim on which relief can be granted.

On appeal, Gandy contended he was entitled to mandamus relief, arguing that he was entitled to final review of and decision on his transfer application by the executive director.  DOC’s transfer application process imposed a duty on the director to process Gandy’s application and then send it to the executive director for his final review and decision. Because this duty is clear, mandamus relief was appropriate.

Gandy also argued that the two-year reapplication waiting period was improperly imposed. The Colorado Court of Appeals agreed, finding that DOC regulations do not require or provide for the imposition of a two-year waiting period before permitting an offender to reapply.

Gandy further argued that the district court erred when it dismissed his constitutional claims for failure to state a claim because the regulation conflicts with federal treaties and thus violates the Supremacy Clause. However, the court found no conflict between DOC regulations and international treaties.

Gandy next argued that defendants discriminated against him by refusing to process his transfer request due to his national origin. The court agreed with the district court that Gandy did not plead any facts supporting this allegation.

The judgment dismissing Gandy’s constitutional claims was affirmed. The judgment dismissing the complaint seeking mandamus relief was reversed, and the case was remanded with directions to enter an order directing the director to forward the transfer application and recommendations to the executive director for final review and decision.

Summary available courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

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