October 18, 2017

Archives for October 4, 2017

Colorado Supreme Court: Translated Miranda Warning Adequately Conveyed Intent of Warning

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Nguyen on Monday, October 2, 2017.

Miranda Warnings.

The Colorado Supreme Court held that a translated Miranda warning stating that if the suspect waived his right to be silent, “[a]ll you say will and may be used as evidence in court,” reasonably conveyed to defendant that anything he said could be used against him in court. By informing him that his statements could be used in court, the translation included the concept that the statements could be used against him (as well as for him) in court. The court also held that a Miranda warning stating that “if you do not have money to hire an attorney the court will instruct you, will appoint a person to you at no cost to represent you before asking questions” adequately conveyed the right to an appointed attorney.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Presentence Confinement Credit Only To Be Given for Charge Being Sentenced

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Torrez on Monday, October 2, 2017.

Criminal Law—Sentencing—Presentence Confinement Credit.

The Colorado Supreme Court reviewed the Colorado Court of Appeals’ opinion crediting defendant for a confinement period after a not guilty by reason of insanity verdict on an unrelated  charge. Under C.R.S. § 18-1.3-405, credit is to be given only where the presentence confinement is caused by the charge on which the defendant is being sentenced. Considering Massey v. People, 736 P.2d 19 (Colo. 1987), and People v. Freeman, 735 P.2d 879 (Colo. 1987), the court concluded that defendant was not entitled to presentence confinement credit for her confinement before or after the not guilty by reason of insanity verdict. Accordingly, the court affirmed the judgment of the court of appeals in part and reversed in part, and remanded the case for further proceedings consistent with this opinion.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Trial Court Did Not Err in Denying Defense’s Requested Continuance

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Ahuero on Monday, October 2, 2017.

Criminal Law—Continuances.

This case required the Colorado Supreme Court to decide whether a trial court abused its discretion in denying a continuance that defense counsel requested seeking more time to prepare for trial. At the time the continuance was requested, the trial court considered the following factors: (1) defense counsel would have three weeks to prepare for a two- or three-day trial involving eight witnesses and no physical evidence, but defense counsel refused to make specific arguments on why the additional time was needed; (2) the trial court would have had to rearrange its docket and possibly hand off the case to a different judge; (3) priority is given to cases involving the sexual assault of a child; and (4) the victim’s family wanted to resolve the case promptly.

The supreme court concluded that, under these circumstances, the trial court’s decision to deny a continuance was not so manifestly arbitrary, unreasonable, or unfair to constitute an abuse of discretion. Therefore, the court reversed the court of appeals’ judgment and remanded the case for proceedings consistent with this opinion.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 10/3/2017

On Tuesday, October 3, 2017, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and one unpublished opinion.

Fundamental Administrative Services, LLC v. Cohen

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.