November 18, 2017

Colorado Eminent Domain Practice: The Essential Guide to Condemnation Law and Practice in Colorado

Colorado Eminent Domain Practice, the essential guide to condemnation law and practice in Colorado, will be updated and released this fall. Authored by Leslie Fields, a nationally renowned eminent domain practitioner who retired from Faegre Baker Daniels after 33 years of practice, the updated treatise includes insights into new and important eminent domain case law. On November 16th Ms. Fields will join with current FaegreBD partners, Jack Sperber, Brandee Caswell, and Sarah Kellner, as well as other eminent domain experts, to teach a course entitled Colorado Eminent Domain Practice: Books in Action. The course will draw from the key concepts and developments highlighted in the updated text.

Among the many cases featured in the updated treatise will be last year’s Colorado Court of Appeals decision in Town of Silverthorne v. Lutz, 370 P.3d 368 (Colo. App. 2016). In Lutz, the court upheld the trial court’s exclusion of evidence that the town had received funds from the Great Outdoors Colorado Program (GOCO) for the recreational trail project necessitating the taking of the Lutz property. Even though a state constitutional provision barred GOCO funds from being used to acquire property by condemnation, the court held that evidence of the special funding was not relevant to the town’s authority to condemn the easements under long established case law. The court further reasoned that a condemnation action is a special statutory proceeding that must be conducted according to statutory procedures, and the parties may not raise issues, such as project funding, which would change the character of a condemnation action. The court also stated that while the constitution prohibits GOCO funds from being used to pay the just compensation for condemned property, it does not preclude the use of the funds for other aspects of the project. Therefore, evidence of GOCO funding was properly excluded.

Finally, the Lutz court also rejected the property owners’ argument that evidence of GOCO funding was admissible to show that the town acted in bad faith in deciding that their property was necessary for construction of the trail project. For more on bad faith necessity challenges, as well as the other issues raised in Lutz, refer to the updated Colorado Eminent Domain Practice by Leslie Fields, and register for Thursday’s program using the links below.

CLE Program: Colorado Eminent Domain Practice

This CLE presentation will occur on Thursday, November 16, 2017, at the CLE Large Classroom (1900 Grant St., 3rd Floor) from 9:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Register for the live program here and the webcast here. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — CD Homestudy • Video OnDemandMP3 Audio

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