May 23, 2018

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/14/2018

On Monday, May 14, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued two published opinions and one unpublished opinion.

Eikenberry v. Seward County, Kansas

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Cynthia Dianne Mares Appointed to 18th Judicial District Court

On Thursday, May 10, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper appointed Cynthia Dianne Mares to the 18th Judicial District Court. Mares will fill a vacancy created by the retirement of Hon. Paul A. King, effective July 2, 2018.

Mares is currently an associate judge on the Aurora Municipal Court, where her docket includes criminal matters, traffic infractions, and violations of municipal ordinances. Prior to her work on the Aurora Municipal Court, she was the Arapahoe County Public Trustee. She was Assistant Regulation Counsel at the Colorado Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel from 2005 to 2012, and a Deputy State Public Defender with the Colorado Public Defender’s Office from 1990 to 2005.

Mares is also active in the legal community. She is a past-president of the Hispanic National Bar Association and the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association. She also is a member of the Colorado Womens Bar Association, the Colorado Bar Association, and the American Bar Association. She also is a board member for the Colorado Mexican Cultural Center and a member of the Colorado Gaming Commission.

For more information about the appointment, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/11/2018

On Friday, May 11, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued one published opinion and two unpublished opinions.

Stevenson v. Cordova

United States v. Smith

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Announcement Sheet, 5/10/2018

On Thursday, May 10, 2018, the Colorado Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and 30 unpublished opinions.

Neither State Judicial nor the Colorado Bar Association provides case summaries for unpublished appellate opinions. The case announcement sheet is available here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/10/2018

On Thursday, May 10, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and two unpublished opinions.

United States v. Mallett

Hafoka v. Sessions

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/9/2018

On Wednesday, May 9, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and one unpublished opinion.

United States v. Sepulveda

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/8/2018

On Tuesday, May 8, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued two published opinions and three unpublished opinions.

Raup v. Vail Summit Resorts, Inc.

United States v. Jenkins

Davis v. State of California

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/7/2018

On Monday, May 7, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and four unpublished opinions.

Quintana v. Hansen

Packard v. Goodrich

Oviatt v. Reynolds

Kerner v. City & County of Denver

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Bills Signed Changing Definition of “Similar Coverage” for Workers’ Compensation Coverage of Certain Commercial Vehicle Operators and More

On Friday, May 4, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 12 bills into law. To date, he has signed 223 bills and sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Friday include a bill changing procedures for recalls of directors of special districts, a bill changing the definition of “similar coverage” for workers’ compensation purposes for certain operators of commercial vehicles, and more. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-076 – “Concerning a Ban on Vote Trading,” by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill makes it a misdemeanor criminal offense for a person to trade a vote or offer to trade a vote with another elector in this state or a person in another state in exchange for the other person’s vote for or against a particular candidate, ballot issue, or ballot question.
  • SB 18-143 – “Concerning Measures to Increase Revenue for the Parks and Wildlife Division, and, in Connection Therewith, Setting Certain Hunting, Fishing, Parks, and Recreation Fees,” by Sens. Steven Fenberg & Don Coram and Reps. Jeni James Arndt & James Wilson. The bill makes several changes to the statutes in the “Hunting, Fishing, and Parks for Future Generations Act.”
  • SB 18-178 – “Concerning the Definition of Similar Coverage for Workers’ Compensation for Certain Operators of Commercial Vehicles,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. Current law requires independent operators of commercial vehicles to have workers’ compensation or a private insurance policy that provides similar coverage. The bill changes ‘private insurance policy’ to ‘occupational accident coverage insurance policy’ and specifies the requirements for when such a policy may be considered as providing similar coverage.
  • SB 18-207 – “Concerning Authority for the Department of Human Services to Retain Amounts from Certain Cash Funds for its Indirect Costs,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill authorizes the department of human services to retain money for its indirect costs, based on a federally approved cost allocation plan, from the older Coloradans cash fund and the nurse home visitor program fund.
  • HB 18-1040 – “Concerning Incentives for Provision of Sex Offender Services in the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Adrienne Benavidez and Sen. Rhonda Fields. The bill requires the department of corrections to monitor the number of inmates who need sex offender treatment or services and the number who are not receiving such treatment or services, develop an incentive plan to contract for more mental health professionals to provide sex offender treatment or services in difficult-to-serve geographic areas, and report to the joint budget committee the number of inmates needing treatment or services, the number not receiving the treatment or services, and the impact of the incentive plan.
  • HB 18-1235 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Custom Meat Processors, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2017 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Chris Hansen & Hugh McKean and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill implements the recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies in its sunset review and report on the ‘Custom Processing of Meat Animals Act.’
  • HB 18-1240 – “Concerning the Continuation of a Grant Program to Prevent Motor Vehicle Theft, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Sunset Review Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Jeff Bridges & Jon Becker and Sen. John Cooke. The bill continues the automobile theft prevention authority and the automobile theft prevention board until 2029.
  • HB 18-1265 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Stroke Advisory Board in Accordance with the Recommendation in the Department of Regulatory Agencies’ 2017 Sunset Report,” by Reps. Susan Lontine & Susan Beckman and Sen. Larry Crowder. The Bill implements the recommendation in the department of regulatory agencies’ sunset review of the stroke advisory board by continuing the board but imposes a 10-year sunset period rather than continuing the board indefinitely, as was recommended.
  • HB 18-1268 – “Concerning the Procedures to Recall a Director of a Special District,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill requires the court as defined for the special district to appoint a designated election official to oversee the recall election. The director and the director’s spouse or civil union partner cannot serve as the DEO. The bill requires that recall petitions must be approved as to form by the DEO before being circulated.
  • HB 18-1305 – “Concerning a Voluntary Contribution Designation Benefiting the Young Americans Center for Financial Education Fund that Appears on the State Individual Tax Return Forms,” by Reps. James Coleman & Patrick Neville and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill creates the Young Americans Center for Financial Education fund in the state treasury. A voluntary contribution designation line for the fund will appear on the state individual income tax return form for the 5 income tax years following the year that the executive director of the Department of Revenue certifies to the revisor of statutes that there is space on the form and the fund is next in the queue.
  • HB 18-1329 – “Concerning a Supplemental State Payment to Qualified Providers of Durable Medical Equipment who Experienced a Decrease in Reimbursement in the 2017-18 State Fiscal Year as a Result of the Implementation of the Federal ’21st Century Cures Act,’ and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill authorizes a supplemental payment of state-only money to qualified providers of durable medical equipment who experienced a decrease in reimbursement in the 2017-18 state fiscal year as a result of the implementation of the federal ’21st Century Cures Act.’
  • HB 18-1338 – “Concerning Transfers to Address the Reduction of Revenues in the Severance Tax Operational Fund,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kent Lambert. Under current law, money is transferred from the severance tax operational fund to certain cash funds to benefit programs that are commonly referred to as the tier 2 programs. On June 30, 2018, the bill requires the state treasurer to transfer money to the operational fund from specified cash funds to recoup money that was previously transferred in this fiscal year for tier 2 programs.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/4/2018

On Friday, May 4, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued two published opinions and two unpublished opinions.

Arevalo-Lara v. Sessions

United States v. Lara

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Bills Signed Changing Revenge Pornography Crimes, Amending Laws Related to Bicycles Approaching Intersections, and More

On Thurdsay, May 3, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law. To date, he has signed 211 bills and sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday include a bill changing the laws concerning revenge pornography crimes, a bill requiring state agencies to conduct analyses to determine which businesses are not complying with their rules, a bill permitting municipalities to adopt rules concerning bicycles approaching intersections, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-132 – “Concerning a Waiver of Federal Law to Permit Insurance Carriers to Offer Catastrophic Health Plans to Any Individual Residing in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Rep. Chris Kennedy. The bill requires the commissioner of insurance to conduct an actuarial analysis to determine if the sale of catastrophic health plans to Colorado residents 30 years of age and older and not meeting a hardship requirement would result in a reduction in advanced premium tax credits received by Colorado residents or increase the average premiums of individual health plans.
  • SB 18-144 – “Concerning the Regulation of Bicycles Approaching Intersections,” by Sen. Andy Kerr and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Chris Hansen. The bill permits a municipality or county to adopt a local ordinance or resolution regulating the operation of bicycles approaching intersections with stop signs or illuminated red traffic control signals. Under a local regulation, a bicyclist approaching a stop sign must slow to a reasonable speed and, when safe to do so, may proceed through the intersection without stopping. A bicyclist approaching an illuminated red traffic control signal must stop at the intersection and, when safe to do so, may proceed through the intersection.
  • SB 18-177 – “Concerning Procedures when Certain Private Schools Cease Operations,” by Sens. Kevin Priola & Nancy Todd and Reps. Jeff Bridges & Lang Sias. Under existing law, private occupational schools and certain private degree-granting schools are required to provide a bond or other form of surety that is used to facilitate transfer or to provide tuition and fee reimbursement for students in the event that the school closes. When a private occupational school closes, that school’s records must be maintained by the private occupational school board in the Division of Private Occupational Schools. The bill allows the Department of Education to make a claim on a surety bond for reimbursement of actual administrative costs associated with a school closure.
  • HB 18-1193 – “Concerning the Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. James Wilson & Barbara McLachlin and Sens. Ray Scott & Rachel Zenzinger. The bill extends the pilot program three years. It requires the Department of Education to report the number of students in the pilot program who enrolled in advanced placement courses during the prior school year and to collect disaggregated data from the advanced placement exam vendor to capture the performance of students who are participating in the pilot program on the end-of-course advanced placement exams.
  • HB 18-1250 – “Concerning an Analysis to Improve Compliance with Departmental Rules by Regulated Businesses,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lang Sias and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill equires each state agency to conduct an analysis of noncompliance with its rules to identify rules with the greatest frequency of noncompliance, rules that generate the greatest amount of fines, how many first-time offenders were given the opportunity to cure a minor violation, and what factors contribute to noncompliance by regulated businesses. The analysis will guide each department on how to improve its education and outreach to regulated businesses on compliance with the department’s rules.
  • HB 18-1257 – “Concerning a Correction to House Bill 16-1316 by Reinserting the Word ‘Not,'” by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. John Cooke. House Bill 16-1316 amended the venue statute for transferring child welfare proceedings between counties and inadvertently struck the word ‘not’ in one sentence. Due to this error, courts are not allowed to transfer child welfare proceedings between counties after adjudication even though the intent of House Bill 16-1316 was to allow post-adjudication transfers. The bill reinserts the word ‘not’ to allow such transfers.
  • HB 18-1264 – “Concerning Measures to Clarify the Scope of Revenge Porn Criminal Offenses,” by Reps. Dominique Jackson & Terri Carver and Sens. John Cooke & Rhonda Fields. Currently, Colorado criminalizes posting nude images of another person for harassment purposes or for pecuniary gain. The bill adds images of sex acts that may not include nude images, removes the requirement that the defendant intend to inflict serious emotional distress removes as an exception to the crimes that the image relates to a newsworthy event, and clarifies that the images subject to the crimes may be disclosed by law enforcement personnel, human or social services personnel, prosecutors, and court personnel in the course of their normal business.

For a complete list of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 5/3/2018

On Thursday, May 3, 2018, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued one published opinion and three unpublished opinions.

Duran v. Muse

United States v. Shane

Onyango v. Dowling

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.