July 22, 2016

Colorado Court of Appeals: Announcement Sheet, 7/21/2016

On Thursday, July 21, 2016, the Colorado Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and 38 unpublished opinions.

Neither State Judicial nor the Colorado Bar Association provides case summaries for unpublished appellate opinions. The case announcement sheet is available here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/21/2016

On Thursday, July 21, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and eight unpublished opinions.

United States v. Moreno

Church Mutual Insurance Co. v. Ma’afu

Callahan v. Communications Graphics, Inc.

Whittington v. Maes

United States v. Beadles

United States v. Washington

United States v. Perez

Scribner v. Works & Lentz, Inc.

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Notice-Prejudice Rule Applies Where Claim Filed with Insurance Company After Contractual Period

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in MarkWest Energy Partners, L.P. v. Zurich American Insurance Co. on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Insurance—Notice-Prejudice Rule—Occurrence Liability Policy.

MarkWest Energy Partners, L.P. (MarkWest), a natural gas company, procured from Zurich American Insurance Company (Zurich) a commercial general liability policy (the policy) with a limited pollution liability endorsement (the endorsement), covering “incidents” occurring between November 1, 2012, and November 1, 2013. On November 4, 2012, MarkWest was constructing a pipeline when a chemical used in the drilling process escaped the drilling area, thereby contaminating the surrounding area. MarkWest immediately reported the incident to local environmental officials, who approved a chemical cleanup protocol and confirmed that cleanup had been successfully completed in February 2013. On March 28, 2013, MarkWest notified Zurich of the contamination and filed an associated claim. Zurich denied the claim because MarkWest had failed to provide notice within 60 days of the incident, as required by the endorsement. MarkWest filed an action for damages, and the district court granted Zurich’s motion for summary judgment.

On appeal, MarkWest contended that the notice-prejudice rule applied and the district court erred in granting Zurich’s motion for summary judgment. Colorado’s notice-prejudice rule applies even where, as here, the notice requirement is a condition precedent to coverage under an occurrence liability policy. Therefore, unless Zurich can show that its ability to investigate the occurrence or defend against a claim was prejudiced by MarkWest’s late notice, the court cannot deny a claim based solely on a failure to strictly comply with the notice provision. Because the district court concluded otherwise, its decision was reversed and the case was remanded for further proceedings.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Tender of Funds in Satisfaction of Lien Before Redemption Period Must Be Accepted by Creditor

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Mortgage Investment Enterprises, LLC v. Oakwood Holdings, LLC on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Foreclosure—Lien—Redemption.

The debtors purchased the property at issue and subsequently defaulted on their obligation to pay monthly fees to the Kimblewyck Village Owners Association (Kimblewyck). Kimblewyck filed a lien against the property. The property was also encumbered by (1) a lien filed by the Fox Run Owners Association and (2) two judgments entered in favor of Community Management Association, Inc. (CMA). Kimblewyck obtained a judgment and decree of foreclosure. Mortgage Investments Enterprises LLC (Mortgage Investments) was the successful bidder at the foreclosure sale. On the day before the foreclosure sale, Oakwood Holdings, LLC (Oakwood) purchased the Fox Run lien and both CMA judgments. Oakwood subsequently filed notices of intent to redeem the Fox Run lien and one of the CMA judgments. Mortgage Investments tendered, on behalf of the debtor, pursuant to a valid power of attorney, lien satisfaction payments to Oakwood. Although Oakwood’s period to redeem had not yet begun, it refused to accept the payments. Mortgage Investments filed a complaint for a declaratory judgment that Oakwood was required to accept Mortgage Investments’ tenders on behalf of the debtor. Oakwood subsequently redeemed the property, and the district court granted Oakwood’s motion for summary judgment.

On appeal, Mortgage Investments argued that the district court erred in concluding that Oakwood had no duty to accept tender of payment in satisfaction of its liens. Prior to the start of Oakwood’s period to redeem and before it tendered redemption funds, Oakwood had a duty to accept Mortgage Investments’ tender of payment, on behalf of the debtor, in satisfaction of the lien Oakwood sought to redeem. The district court’s judgment was reversed and the case was remanded with directions to enter summary judgment in favor of Mortgage Investments.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Proof of Alleged Abuse Not Required Where Child Adjudicated Dependent Based on Lack of Parental Care

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of L.K. on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Dependency and Neglect—Sexual Abuse—Polygraph Examination—Treatment Plan—Testimony—Evidence—Attorney Fees—Discovery Violations—Sovereign Immunity.

L.K. alleged sexual abuse by her father, C.K. Although C.K. denied the allegations, he stipulated that L.K. was dependent and neglected because she lacked proper parental care. The court accepted his admission and adjudicated L.K. dependent and neglected. The Moffat County Department of Social Services (MCDSS) devised a treatment plan for C.K., which required, among other things, that C.K. take a polygraph examination as part of denier’s treatment. Moffat later moved to terminate C.K.’s parental rights. Among other things, the court found that C.K. had been referred for a polygraph examination but did not appear for it, and it granted the termination motion, citing C.K.’s failure to successfully complete treatment designed to address the allegations of sexual misbehavior with L.K. as sufficient evidence that he was unable or unwilling to provide nurturing and safe parenting to adequately address her needs.

On appeal, C.K. contended that the trial court committed reversible error by considering the denier’s treatment polygraph examination as evidence supporting its determination that he failed to successfully complete his treatment plan. He did not dispute either that his treatment plan required him to participate in denier’s treatment or that a polygraph examination was required in denier’s treatment. For these reasons, the court properly admitted evidence of efforts to schedule an appointment for a polygraph examination and evidence that C.K. did not keep the appointment, and the court did not err in considering this evidence in terminating C.K.’s parental rights.

Next, C.K. contended that MCDSS had the burden to prove by clear and convincing evidence that his parental rights should be terminated, but the trial court erred by unfairly shifting the burden of proof to him when he decided not to testify in the termination hearing. When C.K. failed to present evidence, the court did not improperly shift the burden of proof, infringe on his privilege against self-incrimination, or draw impermissible adverse inferences.

Finally, C.K. contended that MCDSS did not prove its case by clear and convincing evidence, asserting the absence of such evidence that he had sexually abused L.K., which was the basis for the petition in dependency and neglect. However, the factual basis for adjudicating L.K. dependent and neglected had already been established, and MCDSS’s burden was to prove the criteria for termination, including C.K.’s failure to comply with his treatment plan. The Court of Appeals rejected the contention that the evidence was insufficient to support the judgment.

On cross-appeal, MCDSS contended that the trial court erred in assessing attorney fees against it for discovery violations. Sovereign immunity precludes orders assessing attorney fees against a governmental entity for discovery violations.

The judgment was affirmed and the sanctions order was reversed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/20/2016

On Wednesday, July 20, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and seven unpublished opinions.

Antonio v. Lynch

Feldt v. Heritage Homes of Nebraska, Inc.

United States v. Rogers

United States v. Lewis

United States v. Amador-Beltran

Ray v. Colvin

Williams v. McKee

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Proposed Development Plan Need Not Include Outdoor Gathering Space

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Rangeview, LLC v. City of Aurora on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Rezoning of Property—Site Plan—Standards—Abuse of Discretion.

BFR’s application to rezone its parcel of property (the property) was granted. Rangeview LLC owns Rangeview Estates, which borders the property to the west, and Eades and Sellery each own property in the neighborhoods surrounding the property. Rangeview, Eades, and Sellery (collectively, Rangeview) filed the underlying action against the City of Aurora, claiming that the Aurora City Council exceeded its jurisdiction in granting BFR’s application to rezone the property. The district court affirmed the City Council’s decision.

On appeal, Rangeview argued that City Council abused its discretion by approving the site plan because the plan did not include an outdoor gathering space as mandated by the Aurora Municipal Code’s (Code) sustainable infill redevelopment (SIR) zoning district design standards. The Code defaults to the terms of the SIR handbook, which states that projects “should” provide a public space. Therefore, although a public space is desirable, it is not required. Because City Council’s approval was supported by competent evidence, it did not abuse its discretion.

Rangeview also argued that City Council abused its discretion in rezoning the property to an SIR district when the property does not meet the requirements of an “infill development parcel,” the proportions of which are defined in the Code. Because the Code language’s ordinary meaning does not reference any requirement related to the proportions of developed boundaries, the City Council did not abuse its discretion by approving the rezoning request even though the property would not meet the definition of an “infill development parcel.”

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Proof of Mailing of License Revocation Notice Insufficient to Prove Knowledge in Criminal Proceeding

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Boulden on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Knowledge Element ofDriving Under Restraint.

Defendant’s driver’s license had been suspended for seven months when he was pulled over. He was convicted of driving under restraint.

On appeal, defendant contended that there was insufficient evidence to support his conviction. Knowledge is an essential element of the crime of driving under restraint. The prosecution admitted into evidence a certified copy of defendant’s driving history, which showed that notice of defendant’s driver’s license suspension had been mailed to him. Mere proof of mailing, however, is not sufficient in a criminal case to prove beyond a reasonable doubt a defendant’s knowledge of restraint of his driver’s privilege. Accordingly, no reasonable jury could have found that the prosecution proved the knowledge element of driving under restraint. Defendant’s conviction and sentence for driving under restraint were vacated, and the trial court was directed on remand to enter a judgment of acquittal.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/19/2016

On Tuesday, July 19, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued five published opinions and six unpublished opinions.

Gosselin v. Kaufman

Jones v. Midland Funding

Hollis v. Aerotek, Inc.

United States v. Dishmon

Sanchez v. Crocs, Inc.

Glenn v. McCollum

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/18/2016

On Monday, July 18, 2016, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and three unpublished opinions.

United States v. Winberg

Ring v. Lightle

Proch v. U.S. Bureau of Prisons

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, some published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.

Colorado Court of Appeals: No Confrontation Clause Right Exists in Restitution Hearing

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Vasseur on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

Colorado Organized Crime Control Act—Restitution—Sixth Amendment—Right of Confrontation—Hearsay—Foundation—Authentication.

Vasseur pleaded guilty to violating the Colorado Organized Crime Control Act for her participation in an Internet scam through which money was stolen from 374 victims. She was sentenced and the district court imposed $1,010,467.55 in restitution, based on a spreadsheet summarizing the criminal acts and the testimony of the primary investigator on the case.

Vasseur appealed the restitution order, contending that the district court erred when it considered the summary spreadsheet in imposing restitution because (1) it violated her Sixth Amendment right of confrontation, and (2) the spreadsheet contained inadmissible hearsay, lacked a proper foundation, and had not been properly authenticated. The right of confrontation and the Colorado Rules of Evidence do not apply to sentencing proceedings, including restitution hearings. Therefore, the district court did not abuse its discretion when it relied on the spreadsheet in determining the amount of restitution.

The order was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Jury Properly Instructed on Elements of Theft

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Stellabotte on Thursday, July 14, 2016.

John Arthur Stellabotte is the owner of J&J Towing. After several incidents where J&J towed cars without authorization and charged high fees for return of the vehicle, Stellabotte was charged with six counts of aggravated motor vehicle theft, four counts of theft, and five habitual criminal counts. He was convicted of one count of aggravated motor vehicle theft, two class 4 felony counts of theft, one class 2 misdemeanor count of theft. He was sentenced to 24 years on all felony theft counts and one year on the misdemeanor count, to run concurrently.

On appeal, Stellabotte raised two contentions related to jury instructions, argued that his sentence should be halved because of new legislation reducing the severity of the offenses, and argued the 24-year sentences were grossly disproportionate to the severity of the offenses. The court of appeals analyzed the jury instructions and found no error; the instructions correctly stated the law despite formatting differences. The court also disagreed with Stellabotte that the trial court erred in using the dictionary definition of “authorization.” The court of appeals found no abuse of discretion in the trial court’s definition. However, the court of appeals agreed with Stellabotte that he should receive the benefit of the legislative changes. Because the General Assembly reduced the theft offenses to class 5 felonies, Stellabotte should have been sentenced under the legislative scheme in effect at the time of sentencing.

The court vacated Stellabotte’s sentences and remanded for the court to resentence him in the correct presumptive range. The court emphasized that this decision did not affect the aggravated motor vehicle theft or misdemeanor counts, only the class 4 felony theft convictions. Finally, the court of appeals rejected Stellabotte’s argument that the sentences were disproportionate to the severity of his crimes.

Judge Dailey concurred in part and dissented in part; he would have affirmed the sentences on the theft counts since the incidents occurred when the old sentencing scheme was in effect.