October 31, 2014

New Legal Technology: Reduced Risk, Increased Flexibility, Automated Systems—Better for Lawyers

tech-lawIt’s estimated that 90% of lawyers use mobile to check email; 34% of lawyers use tablets in the courtroom; 27% of law firms have legal blogs; 10% of individual lawyers have blogs; 48% use a tablet at work (and the tablet is capturing laptop share); 17% use litigation support software; 39% of blogs resulted in clients or referrals; 40% of solos and 30% of all lawyers use cloud services; and 58% use Dropbox to transfer and store files. Technology (including legal technology) moves fast, with new products and updates arriving at a dizzying pace.

Wouldn’t it be nice if this burgeoning technology resulted in less time in the office and an increase in billings? Many attorneys are finding this to be the case. Automating systems and keeping better track of files and cases has actually resulted in more flexibility and peace of mind for attorneys, even those having to juggle more responsibilities. In addition, smaller firms have discovered by using new technologies they are able to better compete with larger firms.

This year’s first Colorado Legal Technology Expo is October 27-28, 2014, at the CBA-CLE offices in Denver. The Legal Technology Expo is free and the place for the technology and legal communities to interact and to mutually benefit.

Not only will there be legal technology companies exhibiting, but short, educational seminars offered on the latest in technology for the legal community. Legal technology tips and best practices will be shared by experts with topics that include: Managing Interruption and Info Overload; Cloud Security; E-Recording; Using the Latest in Technology to Market Your Law Firm; and 5 Technologies Every Lawyer Should be Using Today.

We invite you to drop by, even for an hour or two, to the free Legal Tech Expo. Click here to find out more and to register for the 20-30 minute educational seminars.

CLE Program: The 2014 Colorado Legal Technology Expo

This CLE presentation will take place from Monday, October 27 through Tuesday, October 28, 2014. Click here to register.

 

Colorado Supreme Court Reverses Years of Precedent in Softrock and Western Logistics

It is advantageous to employers to retain the services of independent contractors when possible. Contractors are not required to be covered by workers’ compensation insurance and employers need not pay unemployment tax out of the contractors’ wages. However, classifying workers as contractors has its risks; after an audit, the employer may be found liable for back taxes on workers who are found to be employees rather than contractors.

That is precisely what happened to Carpet Exchange in 1993, when the Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Carpet Exchange of Denver v. Industrial Claim Appeals Office, 859 P.2d 278 (Colo. App. 1993). The court of appeals analyzed C.R.S. § 8-70-115(1)(b) and, after applying the factors, decided that the workers in question were employees rather than contractors because they were not “customarily engaged in an independent trade, occupation, profession, or business related to the service performed.” Since then, courts have relied on this one-factor test to determine whether long-term workers are employees or contractors.

Industrial Claim Appeals Office v. Softrock Geological Services, 2014 CO 30 (Colo. May 12, 2014), reversed that precedent. In Softrock, the Colorado Supreme Court rejected the outside employment test as dispositive of whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor, ruling instead that the totality of the circumstances must be considered and no single factor can be dispositive in deciding whether an individual is customarily engaged in an independent business or trade.

Michael Santo, lead counsel in Softrock, will present a lunchtime program on Friday, August 22, 2014 at the CLE offices to discuss Softrock‘s impact on employment law. Santo will also discuss Western Logistics, Inc. v. Industrial Claim Appeals Office, 2014 CO 31 (Colo. May 12, 2014), a related opinion that the supreme court delivered the same day as Softrock. Employment attorneys, business attorneys, and in-house counsel should attend this informative lunchtime program.

CLE Program: Independent Contractor or Employee? Softrock‘s and Western Logistics‘ Effect

This CLE presentation will take place on August 22, 2014. Click here to register for the live program and click here to register for the webcast. You can also register by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemand

6 Ways To Overcome Fear of Failure

Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared on the ALPS 411 blog on August 11, 2014. Reprinted with permission.

SusanCartierLiebelBy Susan Cartier Liebel

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone ~ Neale Donald Walsh

We’ve all been there. We are so morbidly afraid to fail. So afraid, in fact, we find ourselves paralyzed and simply can’t take the next step forward. Not one. And when it comes to starting a solo practice or taking on a legal matter one grade level above our expertise or leaving the Big Law job you hate, you name it, it can cripple us and severely limit our futures.

This fear is quite possibly the single strongest force holding people down far below their professional and personal potential. In a crazy world full of uncertainty, a roller coaster economy, the myriad of unexpected disasters that could happen to anyone at any time, isn’t it easy to see why most people will take the safest route possible, the tried and true?

But this is where the joke is on us: playing it safe has risk as well. If you never give yourself permission to fail, your success in life will have clear self-imposed limits. Most people grossly underestimate their recuperative powers if they don’t succeed. This underestimation leads them to pass on valuable opportunities that come knocking. And we’ve all read with awe and longing the stories of those who failed often, failed big and then rose to the top with incredible success. It’s part of our business folklore!

If you are reading this, chances are you want to open a solo practice. Here are a few strategies that can help you put risk and reward of opening up your own business in perspective. It may even help you to challenge the fears which have been holding you back from taking the plunge.

1. Missed opportunities don’t happen without a cost – Without taking risk, you can’t take advantage of opportunities that present themselves. While a steady paycheck may sound appealing, a pink slip can hit you upside the head without warning, too. But, even in with this possibility, your life can still be pleasing and predictable, quiet and reasonably fulfilling. However, the odds of you creating something original are very low and most likely you will not leave any lasting mark on the world. (And that’s not to say that’s a bad thing.) But the reality is today’s careers are dynamic, not static and you may not have the luxury of a pleasing and predictable life. Career planning is less about planning and more about being continuously alert to opportunities that present themselves to you spontaneously. You need to be able to respond. Therefore, the ideal career is one where there is a wide range of opportunities (some more risky, some less) that together form a relatively safe career choice with a high upside for growth. Taking some of these high risk opportunities is essential because at the end of the day, they offer the greatest upside for reward.

2. Banish Ignorance – What we don’t know is the source of most fear. Eliminate the paralyzing power of fear by learning and understanding what you are up against. Research and be aware of all the possible outcomes (both the good and the bad) so you can get both a macro and micro picture of the benefits of success and the risks of failure. This analysis will help you see beyond the fear and help you make a more reasoned and dispassionate decision. Learn what it really means to run your own business as a lawyer. Talk to lawyers who are doing it; talk to lawyers who have done it and now are doing something else. Educate yourself. It is the most powerful antidote to fear.

3. And if you fail? – Know how long it will take you to recover if you fail. Odds are it will be less time than you think and not as financially disruptive as you fear. Is the fear of a few potentially difficult months so strong it can keep you in a mediocre or miserable situation indefinitely?

4. Understand the benefits of failure – While I say there is no such thing as failure if you try (only not trying is failure) others believe you can fail and should fail and should fail often. So if you are in this category know that every failure is an experiment and an opportunity to grow. Sometimes, even if the failure impacts you financially, oftentimes the knowledge you accumulate from the experience can be worth the financial downside. It can even position you for the next opportunity which will help you not only recoup the losses but take you further in your life than you would have gone otherwise. In the corporate world, it is well known that managers prefer to hire someone who tried to start a company and failed than someone who has always been strictly corporate. It is true in the legal world, too. Many who have gone solo have been offered jobs because they showed initiative, took risks, showed they could wear multiple hats and hustle. That the solo practice wasn’t a raging success didn’t matter to the hiring lawyer. The initiative, chutzpah and self-taught education the lawyer received is what mattered.

5. Have a Plan BContingency plans (or a safety net) are yet another way to minimize risk. If Plan A doesn’t work out you always have Plan B. Sometimes just knowing there is a Plan B makes it easier to move forward with Plan A. I find, depending upon the situation, having contingency plans allows me to take more risks and take them with greater confidence simply because I know it’s not ‘do or die.’

6. Start Moving – Sometimes the best way to climb the mountain is not to look at the mountain peak but down at your feet and put one foot in front of the other. As soon as you take the first step you begin to gain experience and education. We’ve all been there. Everything is or seems hardest the first time we do it quite simply because we’ve never done it before. So, you just put one foot in front of the other, build up momentum and rhythm and as you get closer to your goal, the fear of not succeeding seems less overwhelming.

How have you addressed your fears?

Susan Cartier Liebel is the Founder & CEO of Solo Practice University® (solopracticeuniversity.com), the only educational and professional networking community for lawyers and law students designed for those who want to create and grow their solo or small firm practices.

A coach/consultant for solos and small firms, an attorney who started her own practice right out of law school, a Member of the Suffolk School of Law – Institute on Law Practice Technology & Innovation advisory board charged with guiding the Institute’s future, an Entrepreneur Advisor for Law Without Walls, an adjunct professor at Quinnipiac University School of Law for eight years teaching law students how to open their own legal practices right out of law school, a columnist for LawyersUSA Weekly, the Connecticut Law Tribune, The Complete Lawyer, and Law.com, she has contributed to numerous online publications such as Forbes.com, legal publications and books on this topic as well as the issues facing women in the workforce. She speaks frequently to law schools and professional organizations around the country on issues facing solos, offering both practical knowledge and inspiration. She can be contacted at: susan@solopracticeuniversity.com.

CLE is hosting Hanging Your Shingle this weekend. If you are ready to overcome your fears and hang your shingle, this program is for you. Order the homestudy below.

CLE Program: Hanging Your Shingle

This CLE presentation will take place on August 14  through 16, 2014. Click here to order the CD homestudy – click here to order the Video OnDemand homestudy – click here to order the MP3 Audio Download homestudy. You can also order by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Walking the Talk: An Interview with Judy Mares-Dixon

JudyMaresDixonJudy Mares-Dixon, M.A., is well experienced in conflict resolution. Since 1986, she has been working in the dispute resolution field as a trainer, mediator, coach, facilitator, consultant, and dispute resolution systems designer. We are honored to have Judy return to CLE for our 40 Hour Mediation Training beginning on August 11, and are excited to present an interview with Judy.

CLE: Thank you for allowing us to interview you. First, what brought you to the field of conflict resolution?

Judy: I was working full-time as a contract negotiator for the state. I really enjoyed the high-energy interaction and the relationship with customers from around the state. I’ve always been fueled by negotiations. I found out that the City of Boulder was looking for mediators to help resolve landlord-tenant and neighbor-neighbor disputes, so I went through their training course — it’s similar to the 40 Hour course I teach at CLE — and absolutely loved it. I continued working full-time for the state and would mediate for Boulder’s program at night. Some nights, I would return home at 9 o’clock or later and could not sleep because I was so charged up from the excitement of the mediation. The interaction between people who start out so far apart, and their capacity to find intelligent solutions, is fascinating to me.

CLE: What is your favorite part of doing dispute resolution?

Judy: My favorite part is assisting people who have not been able to get through their conflicts to analyze their situation and come up with smart solutions. I love being able to effectively analyze situations and find the pros and cons of a variety of ideas and really assist people in finding the best solutions for everyone, especially in situations where one or more parties think it’s hopeless. I love really thinking about what it’s going to take to solve the problem.

CLE: How do you apply the techniques you teach to your day-to-day life?

Judy: There is always an exchange in business. My colleagues and I are always looking at our projects to decide who is going to do which project, whose skills match best with the job at hand, and we negotiate. I think one of the keys to being a successful mediator is that you have to walk the talk – it is critically important to the job. I work with a small number of associates and we’ve been together for several years. The reason we work so well together and have such a fun, respectful relationship, is that we all walk the talk. We expect high quality work — we expect perfection and are hard on ourselves — but we are good at what we do because we walk the talk. It’s critically important to success as a mediator.

CLE: You mentioned situations where one or more parties think it’s hopeless. Can you share with us a story of a conflict that seemed impossible that you helped resolve?

Judy: I once did a mediation for five physicians who co-owned a practice. Two of the physicians were very senior and three were very junior — new to medicine and new to the practice. Three of the physicians had serious conflicts with each other. There were concerns as to whether everyone was doing their fair share — bringing enough business and revenue to the practice, contributing the right amount. They came to me because they were not sure if they should try to work together or if there should be a buy-out of some of the partners. They felt hopeless and frustrated to say the least — they weren’t getting what they wanted from one another. Ultimately, they decided to stay together in the practice. We developed a monthly evaluation tool so the partners could evaluate who was bringing in revenue and how the work load was shared.

One other thing they were quick to identify was how poorly they responded to conflicts. Three of them would duck and run, one would try to bring the issue to the table, and the other would get aggressive. We worked out a plan for how they could address their concerns when conflicts arise in the future, and expected time frames for resolution of future conflicts.

 

CLE is honored to have Judy return for our 40 Hour Mediation Training. Join us on August 11, 12, 13, 18, and 19 for our 40 Hour Mediation Training with renowned mediator Judy Mares-Dixon. To register, click the links below or call (303) 860-0608.

CLE Program: 40 Hour Mediation Training

This CLE presentation will take place on August 11, 12, 13, 18, and 19, 2014. Click here to register for the live program. You can also register by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Bankruptcy Plan Modification by Debtor’s Counsel – Part of Bankruptcy Update 2014

In any three- to five-year period, many of us face unanticipated financial obstacles – medical expenses, educational expenses, dependent expenses. For a bankruptcy debtor, these unexpected financial burdens can derail a payment plan. Thankfully, the Bankruptcy Code at 11 U.S.C. § 1329 allows post-confirmation plan modifications so that debtors can adapt to changing life circumstances.

Section 1329 permits a debtor, trustee, or holder of an unsecured loan to request modification to increase or reduce payments to a particular class; prolong or shorten the time for those payments; alter the amount of distribution to a creditor in order to account for another payment not covered by the plan; or reduce payments in order to cover health insurance expenses for the debtor.

Experienced bankruptcy attorney Andrew S. Trexler offers some of the common scenarios in which his clients have requested post-confirmation plan modification:

  • To remove unpaid mortgage arrears following a mortgage loan modification and reduce plan length;
  • To bring payments current and reduce payments to account for change in projected disposable income, such as from retirement;
  • To allow for debtor to transition from one job or business to another through temporary reduction in monthly payment and provide for post-petition mortgage and HOA arrears;
  • To provide for pre-petition priority support arrears and cram down secured debt;
  • To surrender property securing Class 2 or 3 debts (Note: this is explicitly allowed by Judge Tallman so long as in good faith but disallowed by Judge Campbell);
  • Generally, to accommodate any significant decrease in disposable income caused by reduction in hours, job loss, increase in taxes due to end of payroll tax holiday in 2013 or increased medical bills, insurance costs, lawsuit defense, etc.; or
  • To allow for the purchase of health insurance (now generally required by the Affordable Care Act), so long as the debtor complies with § 1329(a)(4).

Trexler also provides the sample modification request motions and projected plans for several of these scenarios. He will present on this topic at Friday’s CLE program – Bankruptcy Update 2014 – along with several bankruptcy court judges and other area bankruptcy attorneys. Click the links below to register or call (303) 860-0608.

CLE Program: Bankruptcy Update 2014

This CLE presentation will take place on June 6, 2014. Click here to register for the live program and click here to register for the webcast. You can also register by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — CD homestudy • MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemand

Creative Solutions in the Legal Profession

“Creativity is the soul of the scholar.” -Nnamde Azikiwe, First President of Nigeria

The practice of law is filled with complex problems, and clients frequently ask their attorneys to present creative solutions. Likewise, new attorneys are often tasked with finding creative solutions by senior attorneys. Creativity can be liberating, but it can also be risky—how far is too far to stray from the tried and true path?

Creative filings can lead to sanctions designed to prevent frivolous proceedings. Frivolous proceedings can lead to disciplinary proceedings for violations of Colo. RPC 3.1, which states that a lawyer shall not bring or defend a proceeding unless there is a basis in law or fact for doing so that is not frivolous. So how can a lawyer develop his or her creativity without violating any rules?

CLE is hosting a panel discussion on June 4, 2014, between Byeongsook Seo, a litigation attorney; Jonathan H. Steeler, a transactional attorney; and Hon. Jim S. Miller, a judge. These three panelists have very different backgrounds, but all three exercise creativity in their practices. They will present several scenarios in order to develop creative case strategies from their unique perspectives.

Creativity can open doors for new attorneys and experienced attorneys alike. Join us on June 4 for this interesting panel discussion about the benefits of creativity and the bounds of duty. Click the links below or call (303) 860-0608 to register.

“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things.” -Steve Jobs

CLE Program: Creative Solutions in the Legal Practice

This CLE presentation will take place on June 4, 2014. Click here to register for the live program and click here to register for the webcast. You can also register by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemand

Alternative Lawyer Relationships: Ethical Implications of Contract Lawyering

DavidCLittleOutsourced legal work and contract lawyers are becoming more prevalent. There are many reasons to outsource legal services or hire contract lawyers. David C. Little of Montgomery Little & Soren, PC, in Chapter 3, “Alternative Lawyer Relationships,” of Lawyers’ Professional Liability in Colorado – Preventing Legal Malpractice and Disciplinary Actions, proposes four hypothetical scenarios:

  1. A lawyer is not comfortable drafting a special needs trust to settle a minor client’s personal injury claim and seeks assistance from another lawyer (a specialist experienced in the intricacies of such arrangements) to create the trust.
  2. The general counsel of a business corporation being sued in an environmental damage claim hires a contract law firm that specializes in the defense of environmental damage claims.
  3. A lawyer in one state is not admitted to practice in another state and must retain local counsel in order to participate pro hac vice in the other state.
  4. A firm lawyer in charge of the management of complex litigation asks a temporary lawyer service agency to provide a contract lawyer to organize the client’s documents for discovery production.

These scenarios occur regularly in practice, and there is nothing inherently unethical about hiring contract lawyers or outsourcing legal work. However, each scenario has unique ethical pitfalls, as explained by Little:

In the first example, what happens if the contract lawyer engaged to draft the special needs trust makes a mistake and the minor client loses the benefits the trust would have provided? Does it make any difference if the principal lawyer informed the minor’s guardian about the contract lawyer or had the guardian’s consent? Does the knowledge or consent of the client to the contract lawyer arrangement make any difference?

In the second example, what happens if the specialized law firm hired by the corporation’s general outside counsel discovers that the general counsel has been giving incorrect advice to the client that may have compromised the corporation’s defense to the environmental damage claim? What obligations does the contract firm (the specialist) have to the client to advise the client about the incorrect advice? Is there an independent client-lawyer relationship between the contract specialist and the client, and does the existence of any such relationship depend upon the client’s knowledge of and consent to the arrangement?

In the third example, what are the obligations of local counsel to the client for the procedural aspects of the case in the local lawyer’s jurisdiction? Does the local counsel  have any responsibility to either the client or the referring counsel to advise on either procedural or substantive matters involved in the claim?

Finally, what happens in the fourth example if the contract lawyer fails to recognize the proprietary nature of many of the client’s scientific documents and the client is damaged when its scientific secrets are disclosed without a protective order? In this example where a temporary lawyer service agency or referral agency is involved, does the agency have any exposure for the temporary lawyer’s errors or omissions?

On May 12, 2014, David Little will discuss ethical considerations involved in alternative lawyer relationships at a lunchtime CLE program, “Alternative Lawyer Relationships: Contract Lawyering and Its Ethical Implications.” Join us for this informative program.

CLE Program: Alternative Lawyer Relationships: Contract Lawyering and Its Ethical Implications

This CLE presentation will take place on May 12, 2014. Click here to register for the live program and click here to register for the webcast. You can also register by phone at (303) 860-0608.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemand

Probate Litigation Depositions – Not Your Grandmother’s Deposition

Probate Litigation ImageProbate litigation depositions can be many things – tense, perhaps emotionally draining for the deponent and the parties. But as David R. Struthers of Godfrey | Johnson PC illustrates, learning about probate depositions can be entertaining as well.

His tongue-in-cheek materials discuss the prudence of determining in each case whether it is desirable to “open the door of discovery,” despite the endless enjoyment every lawyer derives from conducting depositions. Amidst the humor are practical tips, such as applying to the probate court to use the Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure in order to engage in discovery and requesting permission to videotape the deposition. Struthers is truly a splendid wordsmith who excels at cleverly crafting instructional materials disguised as humor. But his true talent is with the guitar.

In the video clip below, Struthers explains the difficulty in removing a troublesome client who returns to Spencer Crona’s door every single day.

Click here to view online.

CLE Homestudy: Probate Litigation Depositions – Not Your Grandmother’s PI Depo

This CLE presentation took place on March 4, 2014. Click the links below to order the homestudy — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemand

Workplace Privacy To Be Discussed at Employment Law 2014 Conference in March

One of the hot-topic issues for employment law today is workplace privacy. Qusair Mohamedbhai, a leading Colorado employment law attorney, and Philip Gordon, a leading privacy attorney who focuses on HR privacy issues, will tackle this complex and rapidly evolving area of the law at the CBA-CLE 2014 Employment Law Conference on March 20-21. Expect a lively and informative discussion including critical privacy and information security issues raised by the “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) movement and how recent state laws and EEOC guidelines can impact workplace privacy policies involving background checks, especially the use of an employees’ criminal history for employment purposes, and access to employees’ personal social media. Below are excerpts from their upcoming presentation.

Workplace Privacy:
“In the coming year, employers may expect to see more restrictions on access to applicants’ and employees’ criminal history, credit information, and personal social media content.  To further complicate the challenges of addressing privacy in the workplace, employers will be required to grapple with next-generation issues raised by the use of social media as a business tool and the increasing adoption of “bring-your-own-device” (BYOD) programs.  The ever-shifting balance between employer prerogative and employee privacy likely will continue to move in a direction that favors employee privacy.” –  Philip L. Gordon, Littler Mendelson

Workplace Privacy: Criminal Background Checks & Victims of Crimes:
2012 EEOC Guidance on Arrest and Conviction Records in Employment Decisions: For criminal conduct exclusions in hiring practices that are alleged to have an unlawful disparate impact, relevant information includes the text of the policy or practice, associated documentation, and information about how the policy or practice was actually implemented. For example, the EEOC may look for offenses or classes of offenses that were reported to the employer (all felonies, all drug offenses) or how far back in time the report reached. 2012 WL1499883 § V (E.E.O.C. Guidance Apr. 25, 2012). – Qusair Mohamedbhai, RATHOD ǀ MOHAMEDBHAI LLC

CLE Program: Employment Law 2014

This CLE presentation will take place on March 20-21, 2014. Click here to register for the live program. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemandCD homestudy

The New Public Benefit Corporations Act — Unique Features of the Colorado Act

In 2013, the Colorado General Assembly passed HB 13-1138 – Concerning Benefit Corporations, and, In Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation. Governor Hickenlooper signed the bill into law on May 5, 2013, to be effective April 1, 2014. The bill creates a new category of business operation in Colorado – benefit corporations are designed as for-profit corporations that can elect to pursue a humanitarian interest without contraventing the shareholders’ stake in maximizing profits.

The Public Benefit Corporation Act (PBC Act) details requirements for corporations wishing to be considered “benefit corporations.” As defined in the PBC Act, “‘Public benefit’ means one or more positive effects or reduction of negative effects on one or more categories of persons, entities, communities, or interests other than shareholders in their capacities as shareholders, including effects of an artistic, charitable, cultural, economic, educational, environmental, literary, medical, religious, scientific, or technological nature.” This broad definition allows corporations much leeway in determining the public benefits they will offer.

A feature of Colorado’s PBC Act that is not mirrored in most other states allowing benefit corporations is that the Colorado Public Benefit Corporation must state its public purpose with specificity. In the clip below, J. William Callison of Faegre Baker Daniels explains some of the requirements of the PBC Act, with an example of a specific benefit outlined. Also appearing in the video are Herrick K. Lidstone, Jr., of Burns Figa & Will, and Carla Hoke of the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

Click here to view online

The Colorado Public Benefit Corporation Act is legislation that every Colorado business law practitioner should become familiar with before its effective date of April 1, 2014. Click the links below to order the full homestudy.

CLE Homestudy: Public Benefit Corporation Act, Effective April 1, 2014

This CLE presentation took place on February 12, 2014. Click here to order the Video On Demand and watch the entire presentation online, click here for the MP3 Audio Download homestudy, click here for the CD homestudy, or call (303) 860-0608 to order by phone.

 

The Intersection of Religious Freedoms and Workplace Anti-Discrimination Laws

Qusair Mohamedbhia Bio PicBy Qusair Mohamedbhai

It is not every day that lawyers from the ACLU and Focus on the Family share a public stage to debate religious freedoms and workplace anti-discrimination laws. In recent years, tensions between employee anti-discrimination rights in the workplace and religious freedoms of employers have dramatically increased in magnitude and complexity. In the last decade, courts have significantly expanded the rights of religious employers. Additionally, religion-based discrimination charges filed with Equal Employment Opportunity Commission have more than doubled in the past fifteen years. And employees’ rights in the areas of sexual orientation and healthcare have been affected by employers claiming to be governed by faith-based principles.

“The Intersection of Religious Freedoms and Workplace Anti-Discrimination Laws,” which was part of a larger CLE in Colorado, Inc. program titled “Workplace Discrimination,” produced a lively and informative discussion. The presenters debated the tension between anti-discrimination laws including the Colorado Anti- Discrimination Act’s inclusion of sexual orientation as a protected class, and laws protecting religious employers’ rights including the Free Exercise Clause and Religious Freedom Restoration Act. As expected, the ACLU and Focus on the Family had divergent opinions on matters related to the contraceptive mandate issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and religious employer exemptions. The panelists also debated the holdings, reach, and implications of recent high-profile decisions spanning a variety of related topics including the cases of Hosanna-Tabor, Windsor, Hobby Lobby, Abercrombie & Fitch, Little Sisters of the Poor, and Masterpiece Cakeshop Lakewood Bakery. The presenters and moderator demonstrated extraordinary knowledge of these difficult constitutional law matters, as well as theological arguments, historical context, and pragmatic public policy consequences.

Click here to view online

Panelists: Mark Silverstein, Esq., American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, L. Martin Nussbaum, Esq., Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP, and Bruce Hausknecht, Esq., Focus on the Family. Moderator: Scott L. Levin, Esq., Regional Director, Mountain States Region, Anti-Defamation League.

Qusair Mohamedbhai, Esq., is a partner at Rathod | Mohamedbhai llc. His practice is exclusively in the areas of plaintiff’s employment discrimination and constitutional civil rights litigation. He advocates for the rights of employees in the workplace, and for the civil rights of all individuals against governmental and institutional abuses of power. He is a National Institute for Trial Advocacy trial skills and techniques faculty member, co-chair of the Employment Law Section for the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association, and General Counsel to the Colorado Muslim Society. He received his Bachelor of Science in biology from the University of Alberta in 2000, and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Wyoming in 2003.


CLE Homestudy: Workplace Discrimination

This CLE presentation took place on January 10, 2014. Click here to order the Video OnDemand, click here for the MP3 audio download, and click here for the CD homestudy. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to order.

Colorado Adopts Tougher Air Rules for the Oil and Gas Industry—The First in the Nation

BillRitterColorado air quality control commissioners voted 8-1 on Sunday to pass tougher air pollution rules for the oil and gas industry. The rules are the first in the nation designed to detect and reduce methane emissions, a gas linked to climate change. The impetus for the change was the failure of Front Range air to meet federal health standards.

Trying to satisfy environmental needs with those of the oil and gas industry can by difficult, as evidenced by the objections of the Colorado Oil and Gas Association and the Colorado Petroleum Association. The rule changes did, though, have the support of leading oil and gas companies including Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Energy, and Encana.  The impact of these new rules could be tremendous for environmental lawyers and those practicing in the area of Natural Resources & Energy.

This Friday, Feb. 28, the CBA Environmental Law Section is co-sponsoring a program with Colorado Bar Association CLE, “Oil & Gas Development in Colorado: Balancing Energy and the Environment.” Will Allison, the director for the Air Pollution Division, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, will review the new pollution rules and the potential effects in Colorado. Bill Ritter, former governor and now director for the Center for the New Energy Economy, is the keynote speaker and will address the challenges of balancing energy production and new environmental regulation in Colorado.

Other energy and environmental experts are speaking at the program including leaders from the Colorado Oil & Gas Commission, the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, and Colorado energy companies and law firms.

Scott Clark, chair for the program and attorney with Burns, Figa, & Will said, “This program will provide a balanced and focused look at key issues raised by the explosion of oil and gas development in Colorado.”

CLE Program: Oil & Gas Development in Colorado – Balancing Energy and the Environment

This CLE presentation will take place on February 28, 2014. Click here to register for the live program, and click here to register for the webcast. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here — MP3 audio downloadVideo OnDemandCD homestudy