March 6, 2015

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Judgments and Fraudulent Transfer

Editor’s note: This is Part 13 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Shigo, LLC v. Hocker
Colorado Court of Appeals, February 27, 2014
2014 COA 16

Execution upon water rights; homestead; water rights appurtenant to land.

A creditor obtains a judgment against Hocker for $4.4 million, and seeks to levy and execute upon Hocker’s shares in the Highland Ditch Company. Hocker owns an undivided 50 percent interest in two and three-quarter shares of Highland stock. The Highland shares represent Hocker’s right to use water that runs through a mutually owned ditch, a branch of which leads to a pond on the 35-acre farm that Hocker owns with her husband. Hocker files a claim under the homestead exemption, asserting that the shares, which represent water rights appurtenant to her farm, could not be levied. The court denies Hocker’s claim of exemption, and Hocker appeals.

The district court found that the homestead exemption “does not apply to water stock certificates.” The appeals court holds that the homestead exemption for a “farm” includes not just the farm’s soil, but also the water rights appurtenant to the land.

Shares of stock in a mutual ditch company represent water rights. However, because the record is not clear as to whether the water rights represented by the Highland shares are necessary to the use and enjoyment of the farm, the case was reversed and remanded to the trial court for further findings on that issue.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Foreclosure, Debtor-Creditor, Receivers, Lender Liability

Editor’s note: This is Part 12 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Colorado Community Bank v. Hoffman
Colorado Court of Appeals, November 7, 2013
2013 COA 146

Receiver; order for sale certified as final judgment; C.R.C.P. 54(b); deadline to appeal; abuse of process; civil conspiracy.

This action arises from the judicial dissolution of certain companies in the course of a receivership proceeding. The companies were formed to develop golf courses. The bank sought appointment of a receiver when the companies defaulted on development loans. Certain individuals intervened and joined in the motion for appointment of a receiver. The companies asserted counterclaims for abuse of process and civil conspiracy.

The court granted a motion by the receiver for the companies to sell the golf courses to an entity controlled by the intervening individuals. The district court certified the sale orders as final under C.R.C.P. 54(b) to allow an appeal. The sale orders disposed of an “entire claim for relief” for purposes of C.R.C.P. 54(b) certification. Is a sale order in the course of a receivership action an “entire claim”? It can be, reasons the court. It states that prior cases have suggested that orders concerning property ownership can properly be certified. In Corporon v. Safeway Stores, Inc., 708 P.2d 1385 (Colo. App. 1985), the court held that “a quiet title claim is separable from slander and defamation claims, and therefore, properly certifiable under C.R.C.P. 54(b).” Because defendants did not appeal this order within forty-five days of the certification, but rather waited until the counterclaims had been resolved, the court of appeals lacked jurisdiction over this issue and that portion of the appeal was dismissed.

The court affirms the summary judgment order dismissing the abuse of process and civil conspiracy claims. Although the evidence might have proved that the interveners had an ulterior motive in bringing the receivership action, it did not establish the requisite improper use of process element. The rule was recently stated in Sterenbuch v. Goss, 266 P.3d 428 (Colo. App. 2011):

If the action is confined to its regular and legitimate function in relation to the cause of action stated in the complaint there is no abuse, even if the plaintiff had an ulterior motive in bringing the action or if he knowingly brought suit upon an unfounded claim.

The court agrees with the trial court that the claims failed this test. Because the companies’ conspiracy claims were based on the alleged underlying wrong of abuse of process, this claim also failed.

 

Armed Forces Bank v. Hicks
Colorado Court of Appeals, June 5, 2014
2014 COA 74

Guarantor; waiver of anti-deficiency rights; C.R.S. 38-38-106(6); good faith bid at foreclosure sale.

The bank makes a $6 million loan to a closely held, single asset company to build a condominium project in Glenwood Springs. The loan is personally guaranteed by Mr. and Mrs. Hicks, the principals of the company. After the loan goes into default in 2009, the bank agrees to several loan extensions, after which the company remained in default for failure to make certain payments and failure to obtain planning department approval of a condominium plat. After a trip by the company through bankruptcy court, the bank forecloses. At the foreclosure sale, the bank bids $3.7 million, leaving a $6 million deficiency, after all interest, costs and the like are added to the final tab. The bank files a civil action to collect the deficiency against Hicks. The Hicks attempt to assert defenses based on failure to make a bid based on a good faith estimate of fair market value, and alleging that the bank violated its duty of good faith and fair dealing by refusing to approve the plat ten months after the borrowers’ default. In effect, they argue that the bank failed to mitigate its damages by not allowing the plat to be recorded, even if the borrowers were in default, because the property would be more valuable at that point and the receiver would be able to lease the property, generating income to apply to the loan balance.

The court of appeals affirms the trial court’s grant of summary judgment in favor of the bank, holding that the guaranty contained a specific, and very broad, waiver of any right to challenge the bank’s bid at the foreclosure sale based on a “one action or antideficiency law.” In a case of first impression, the court holds that the statutory duty of a creditor under C.R.S. § 38-38-106(6) to bid its good faith estimate of fair market value may be waived, and that such an agreement is not void for violation of public policy. The court contrasts this statute, which has no provision barring a contractual waiver of its terms, with C.R.S. § 38-38-703, which explicitly prohibits agreements to waive, inter alia, the right of cure and redemption. The court notes that there is still a common law duty to make a good faith bid, under Chew v. Acacia Mutual Life, 165 Colo. 43, 437 P.2d 339 (1968) (bid not made in good faith on the basis of what the security could reasonably be expected to produce on sale at its fair market price), but the guaranty signed by Mr. and Mrs. Hicks included a waiver of “any defenses given to guarantors in law or in equity” except for payment of the indebtedness.

It will be interesting to see if the Supreme Court wants to take a look at this.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Easements and Public Roads (2)

Editor’s note: This is Part 11 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

By Frederick B. Skillernfrederick-b-skillern

Maralex Resources, Inc. v. Chamberlain, Public Trustee of Garfield County Colo. App January 2, 2014 2014 COA 5 Oil and gas lease; prescriptive easement for access to wells; adverse or permissive use of roads; standing. Since 1996, Maralex has been a lessee under a series of federal oil and gas leases in Rio Grande County. Maralex operates and maintains various oil and gas wells located on federal land. To access the wells, Maralex and its predecessors in interest have historically used two roads crossing private property now owned by Nona Jean Powell. The Powell property is adjacent to the federal land. After issues arose between Maralex and Powell regarding use of the roads, Maralex filed a quiet title action seeking a decree that it has prescriptive easements over the roads for ingress and egress to the oil leaseholds. The trial court first found that Maralex lacked standing, as a real property lessee, to assert a prescriptive easement claim. Notwithstanding that finding, the court went on to consider the merits of the easement claims as a matter of judicial economy. It found that Maralex’s use of the roads was permissive and not adverse, and that Maralex did not establish the existence of the asserted prescriptive easements. On appeal, the court reverses the holding on standing. Citing a long string of cases, an oil and gas lessee has standing to bring a quiet title action and to enforce easement rights. One can even draw an analogy to surface cases in which use by a tenant may be tacked on to prior use by the fee owner in proving possession for the prescriptive period. The court finds sufficient evidence in the record to affirm the finding that the use by Maralex and its predecessors was permissive, not adverse. It was conceded that oil operators on the government land openly and continuously used the roads on Powell’s property for the statutory period. However, because Powell previously permitted the use, the use was not adverse. What made the use permissive? Like so many cases of this sort, we have gates on the roads, and cattle on a ranch. At one point a former owner of the Powell property gave keys to the oil company, telling a grazing tenant that he wanted to oil operation to be successful, but that he did not want his tenant’s herd to be impacted. Over the course of decades, there was all manner of evidence of a problematic nature, sufficient that the court could go either way on the “adversity” issue. The trial court resolved it like this – “By giving someone a key, it seems to the Court that the only reasonable interpretation is that ‘I want to keep people out, but not you. You have permission to use my road. Here is a key.’” The appeals court also notes that this could also be a recognition of a right of the user to access, with acquiescence by the easement claimant to blockage of use by others. The court goes along with the trial judge.   Sinclair Transportation Company d/b/a Sinclair Pipeline Company v. Sandberg Colorado Court of Appeals, June 5, 2014 2014 COA 76 Pipeline easement; assignability of easement in gross; proof of assignment of easement rights by parol evidence; abandonment. This is one in a series – one might say a family – of cases involving Sinclair’s pipeline between oil fields in Wyoming and Denver. At one point, the pipeline crosses land in Weld County, creating friction with residential development, and with owners of land such as the Sandbergs. Sinclair seeks to upgrade its pipeline from 6” to 10” according to terms of the written pipeline easement, which dates back to 1963. The easement was in favor of the original servient owner and its “successors and assigns.” In an extensive opinion, the court affirms a partial summary judgment ruling in favor of Sinclair on defenses raised by the landowners, who sought to block any expansion or to require movement of the easement in order to minimize its impact on their residential development. The first issue deals with the use of parol evidence to prove a part of Sinclair’s interest (ownership of a series of assignments from partial owners of the pipeline). The court upholds a ruling that Sinclair could prove a part of its chain of title by proving assignment of one 50 percent interest in the line through testimony of an attorney representing one of the parties to the assignment. The court holds that no statute of frauds bars oral testimony to prove of an assignment of an easement. More importantly, the court holds that an easement in gross, especially one created for commercial uses, is assignable. The court relies on the modern trend in case law and comments in the Restatement of Property (Servitudes) § 4.6(1)(c) (“a benefit in gross is freely transferable”), as well as C.R.S. § 38-30-101 (“any person . . . entitled to hold . . . any interest in real estate whatever, shall be authorized to convey the same to another”). The court cites a Utah case, Crane v. Crane, 683 P.2d 1062 (Utah 1984) which surveys the easement in gross case law as it applies to pipelines and other commercial uses. For those interested in the industry, the court goes on to discuss interpretation of the easement document in regard to how a pipeline company can expand and improve its pipeline – whether a pipeline company must “remove, then replace” or “replace, then remove.” Finally, the court holds that Sinclair’s attempt in a parallel case to condemn a way across the land in question did not effect an abandonment of its deeded easement rights. The attempt to condemn was derailed in a 2012 decision of the Colorado Supreme Court discussed in this space. Another court of appeals decision (not discussed in this outline) deals with the pipeline condemnation issues.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Easements and Public Roads (1)

Editor’s note: This is Part 10 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Company v. Wolf
Colorado Court of Appeals, August 1, 2013
2013 COA 118

Railroad right-of-way; incidental use doctrine.

A property owner whose land is subject to a railroad company’s easement for railroad purposes objects when the railroad company leases a portion of its right-of-way to a local nonprofit for a bicycle path. The owner’s predecessor in title granted the railroad company this right in 1881:

[Grantor] does hereby sell, grant, convey, and release unto the said Denver and Rio Grande Railway Company the right of way for a width of one hundred feet—fifty feet on each side of center line—for the construction of the said Railway. . . . Giving and granting unto [the D&RG] the right to excavate, fill, ditch, drain, erect cattle guards and crossings [etc.].

The property owners appeal the trial court’s summary judgment in favor of the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad. The court of appeals affirms.

In 2009, the Durango & Silverton agreed to grant the City of Durango a nonexclusive easement to extend a public recreation trail over its right-of-way and adjacent to the railroad tracks. The tracks remain in use. Part of the trail crosses the Wolf’s property. Durango paid DSNGRR $1 million specifically for continued operations and maintenance. The trail also will promote safe use of the right-of-way by pedestrians and bicyclists who walk and ride directly on the railroad tracks.

Wolf opposed the agreement, arguing that the 1881 right-of-way permitted use only for “railroad purposes” and that a recreation trail is not such a purpose. On cross-motions for summary judgment, the trial court held that the original deed conveyed an exclusive easement. It held that a railroad right-of-way is an expansive form of easement, giving the railroad company exclusive use and control of the right-of-way as long as it continues to operate a railroad. It also found that the use by the public was a railroad purpose, because it eliminated safety and liability problems and increased efficiency on any rail repairs.

Relying on state and federal case law, the court of appeals agrees that the right-of-way is more expansive than a typical easement, and that the Durango & Silverton has the right to exclusive use and control of the servient tenement. This use includes the right to lease portions of the right-of-way. It therefore affirms the judgment.

The appeals court does not address whether a public recreation trail is a “railroad purpose,” as the district court had found, relying instead on the “incidental use” doctrine. This doctrine, which has never been invoked in Colorado, states that a railroad may lease a portion of its right-of-way where the use is incidental to or not inconsistent with the railroad’s continued use of its right-of-way for railroad purposes. The public recreation trail meets both of these criteria, in the court’s view.

Wolf argues that the trial court erred by not requiring the joinder of five neighbors that he alleges are indispensable parties. Their property is also subject to DSNGRR’s right-of- way and are affected by the public recreation trail. The Court disagrees, holding that this dispute is governed in large part by the interpretation of the deed from Wolf’s predecessor, which is specific to Wolf’s property.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Construction Defects

Editor’s note: This is Part 9 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Mid Valley Real Estate Solutions V, LLC v. Hepworth-Pawlak Geotechnical, Inc.
Colorado Court of Appeals, August 1, 2013.
2013 COA 119

Construction defects; economic loss rule; duties of builder-vendor run to commercial entity that purchases house built for residential purpose.

Alpine Bank was lender on a construction project. The builder-developer defaulted. The bank threatened foreclosure, and ultimately took a deed in lieu of foreclosure. Consistent with its usual practice, the property was conveyed to the bank’s REO subsidiary, which then sued for construction defects on the property.

The soils and structural engineers appeal an order denying their motion for summary judgment on the plaintiff’s negligence claim. Does a commercial entity — a wholly owned subsidiary of a construction lender — have the rights of a residential consumer to sue design professionals for negligence, under the claims set out in Cosmopolitan Homes v. Weller, or are such claims barred by the economic loss rule? The court of appeals affirms the district court’s ruling that the “independent duties” outlined in Cosmopolitan Homes and its progeny inure to the benefit of a commercial entity that buys a residential property, so that the claim is not barred by the economic loss rule.

The court reviews the economic loss rule and holds that there is an independent duty of care on the part of a builder in residential construction that renders the economic loss rule inapplicable in that context. Of course, the independent duty, which arises from the holding of our supreme court in Cosmopolitan Homes, would not apply to the typical commercial construction project.

The court then looks to whether Mid Valley — whose sole function is to hold foreclosure property for resale by the bank — falls within the class of plaintiffs who may enforce this independent duty of care. It concludes that the duty arises from the residential nature of a project, not from the characteristics of the owner of that property. While Mid Valley is not a traditional homeowner, the court reasons that allowing defendants to avoid liability for this reason would afford them a “windfall” resulting from the fortuity that the latent defect caused damage before Mid Valley sold the house. Accordingly, the denial of summary judgment was affirmed and the case was remanded for further proceedings. The Supreme Court has accepted the case for review:

Petition for Writ of Certiorari GRANTED, March 3, 2014, S K Peightal Engineers v. Mid Valley Real Estate Solutions V, LLC

Summary of the Issues:

  • Whether the economic loss rule bars a homeowner’s negligence claim against a construction professional when the owner is a commercial entity rather than a natural homebuyer.
  • Whether the interrelated contract doctrine as defined in BRW, Inc. v. Dufficy & Sons, Inc., 99 P.3d 66 (Colo. 2004), can apply to a wholly-owned subsidiary that did not exist when the initial contracts were drafted but instead was created after work on the relevant contracts had been completed.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Contracts, Purchase and Sale, Transactions (5)

Editor’s note: This is Part 8 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

By Frederick B. Skillernfrederick-b-skillern

In the Interest of Delluomo v. Cedarblade
Colorado Court of Appeals, April 10, 2014
2014 COA 43

Revocable living trust; breach of fiduciary duty; undue influence; no attorney fees under breach of trust exception to American Rule.

Delluomo created a revocable living trust and included all of his assets, including title to his real property. He named two beneficiaries, his niece, Cedarblade, and his nephew, Corcoran. Cedarblade uses undue influence (according to the jury) on her uncle and gets him to convey title to Delluomo and herself in joint tenancy. Corcoran objects, and ultimately a conservator is appointed for Delluomo, who brings suit to set aside the property conveyance. The case is tried to a jury, which finds that Cedarblade breached a fiduciary duty. The court set aside the conveyance and granted Cedarblade’s directed verdict on damages. The court did, however, allow the jury to award attorney fees for prosecuting the litigation, as an exception to the American rule allows fees in actions for breach of trust.

The court of appeals reverses that ruling, drawing a distinction between a garden variety breach of fiduciary duty and the kind of breach of trust in which a court has allowed recovery of attorney fees. The lead case is Buder v. Sartore, 774 P.2d 1383, 1390-91 (Colo. 1989), where a custodian of a minor’s account mismanaged funds by investing the funds in penny stocks. The court here notes that Colorado courts have denied recovery of litigation fees “when the circumstances do not involve a type of fund, type of wrong, or type of wrongdoer” at issue in Buder. In other words, Cedarblade did not manage funds for her brother or serve as his trustee; she was a beneficiary, and only controlled funds after her wrongful act. A mere existence of a fiduciary duty is enough; the breach of trust exception calls for control of funds for another, and egregious conduct of some kind. A breach of trust, the court notes, is but one species of breach of fiduciary duty. It is a “failure by the trustee to comply with any duty that the trustee owes, as trustee, to the beneficiaries.” Restatement (Third) of Trusts § 93. This panel notes that our supreme court has “expressly cautioned against liberally construing exceptions to the American rule on attorney fees, because that is “a function better addressed by the legislative than the judicial branch of government.”

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Contracts, Purchase and Sale, Transactions (4)

Editor’s note: This is Part 7 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Taylor Morrison of Colorado, Inc. v. Bemas Construction
Colorado Court Appeals, January 30, 2013
2014 COA 10

Construction defects statute; willful and wanton breach of contract required to overcome liability limitation provisions in contract.

Taylor Morrison of Colorado, Inc. was the developer of a residential subdivision known as Homestead Hills. Pursuant to written contracts with Taylor, Terracon Consultants, Inc. performed geotechnical engineering and construction material testing services at the construction site. Bemas Construction performed site grading.

After many of the homes were constructed, Taylor began receiving complaints about cracks in the drywall of homes. Taylor remedied the defective conditions, and then sued Terracon and Bemas for breach of contract and negligence and other claims.

Taylor also moved for determination as to whether the Homeowner Protection Act of 2007 (HPA) invalidated the limitation of liability clauses in the contracts with Terracon. The trial court denied the motion on the ground that the HPA applies to residential property owners but not to commercial entities.

Terracon moved for leave to deposit into the court’s registry $550,000, representing the maximum amount that Taylor could recover from Terracon under the contractual limitation of liability clauses and the court order. It also requested that upon acceptance of such deposit, the court should declare Taylor’s claims against Terracon moot and dismiss them with prejudice. The trial court ruled in favor of Terracon. The money was deposited and the claims were dismissed with prejudice.

Taylor then went to trial against Bemas. The jury returned a verdict in Bemas’ favor on all of Taylor’s claims. Taylor appeals.

Taylor argued that it was error to rule that the HPA did not invalidate the limitation of liability clauses in Taylor’s contracts with Terracon. The court of appeals panel affirms the trial court’s judgment, but for different reasons. The court holds that regardless of whether the HPA applies to commercial entities, retroactive application of the HPA to these facts would be unconstitutionally retrospective. The Court concludes, however, that further proceedings are necessary to determine whether Taylor should have been permitted to introduce evidence of Terracon’s willful and wanton conduct to attempt to overcome Terracon’s assertion of the limitation of liability clauses.

The judgment is affirmed and the case is remanded to the trial court to determine whether Taylor should have been permitted to introduce evidence of Terracon’s willful and wanton conduct for the sole purpose of attempting to overcome Terracon’s assertion of the limitation of liability clauses at issue.

 

Jehly v. Brown
Colorado Court of Appeals, March 27, 2014
2014 COA 39

Fraudulent Concealment; Imputed Knowledge.

“Actual knowledge,” in the context of a fraudulent concealment claim, cannot be imputed to a principal through knowledge of its agent. Defendant Brown owned real property in Teller County and hired a general contractor to build a house on it. Before commencing, the contractor discovered that part of the property was located in a floodplain. Brown was not told of this fact.

Plaintiffs David and Peggy Jehly entered into a contact to purchase the house from Brown. Brown filled out a Seller’s Property Disclosure form by writing “New Construction” diagonally across every page and not checking any of the boxes. Before buying the house, the Jehlys were never informed that part of the property was located in a floodplain.

Approximately five years after the home purchase, heavy rains caused severe flooding and damage to the basement of the house. The Jehlys sued Brown, alleging he fraudulently concealed knowledge of the floodplain to induce plaintiffs to buy the house. During a bench trial, defendant denied having any personal knowledge of the floodplain at the time of the sale and denied that his general contractor or any subcontractors had so informed him. The trial court found as a matter of fact that he had no knowledge, and found in favor of defendant.

On appeal, plaintiffs asserts that it was error not to impute the general contractor’s knowledge that part of the property was in a floodplain to Brown. The court of appeals disagrees, and affirms. To prevail on a claim of fraudulent concealment, a plaintiff must show that a defendant actually knew of a material fact that was not disclosed. It is not enough that defendant should have or might have known the fact, and knowledge of his agent cannot be imputed for the purpose of this particular tort claim. Plaintiffs did not contest on appeal the trial court’s factual finding that defendant had no active or conscious belief or awareness of the existence of the floodplain. The trial court did not apply the wrong legal standard, because defendant did not have the requisite actual knowledge of the information allegedly concealed.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Contracts, Purchase and Sale, Transactions (3)

Editor’s note: This is Part 6 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillern

By Frederick B. Skillern

Top Rail Ranch Estates, LLC v. Walker
Colorado Court of Appeals, January 30, 2014
2014 COA 9

Sale of residential lots; claim preclusion; fraud; economic loss rule.

Top Rail Ranch entered into a contract with Walker Development to purchase a subdivision of platted residential lots for $1 million, with $200,000 down, and a promissory note for the balance, secured by a second lien deed of trust which it agreed to subordinate to bank financing with Canon National Bank for the subdivision development. Walker Development then attempted to rezone adjoining property that it owned to Agricultural Forestry, with plans to sell the adjoining parcel to a mining company. Walker told Top Rail’s owner, Jensen, that the rezoning was to facilitate a conservation easement.

At this point, everything fell apart, and it is not over yet. Walker sold the adjoining land to a mining company after the rezoning was approved. When the sale was announced, Top Rail sales to potential homeowners froze. The County reversed the mining company’s zoning approval. Top Rail defaulted on its loan with Canon National, which foreclosed on the subdivision lots. Top Rail could not cure; Walker Development redeemed from its second lien position, acquiring title to all but two of the subdivision lots. The parties sued each other in separate actions, and this consolidated appeal follows.

In the first case, Top Rail sued Walker for fraud, breach of contract, bad faith breach of contract and other claims. Walker Development counterclaimed for breach of the covenants in its deed of trust, seeking to recover damages for $200,000 that it had paid to cure a lien for nonpayment of a water tap. The trial court granted a directed verdict on the counterclaim, on the basis that the Walker Development deed of trust had merged into the Public Trustee’s deed after the Canon National Bank foreclosure, and the jury found for Top Rail on its tort and contract claims, awarding in excess of $1 million.

In the meantime, Walker Development sued Top Rail and its principals on the promissory note given in purchase of the property, and for foreclosure on the two lots not covered by Canon National Bank’s foreclosure. The district court dismissed Walker Developments on the basis of claim preclusion, based on the judgments entered in the first action.

On appeal, the court holds that the district court improperly dismissed Walker Development’s counterclaims in the first action on a motion for directed verdict. Regardless of whether the lien imposed by the Walker Development deed of trust was extinguished by foreclosure of the bank’s senior lien – Walker Development acquired title through its certificate of redemption – the contractual covenants in the deed of trust were not extinguished by the foreclosure. Schwab v. Martin, 165 Colo. 547, 441 P.2d 17, 19 (1968). Walker had a valid claim for the money spent to remove the water tap lien.

The court then holds that the fraud and bad faith breach of contract claims asserted by Top Rail are barred by the economic loss rule. It affirms the judgment on Top Rail’s breach of contract claim ($500,000) is affirmed. The case is then remanded for trial on Walker Development’s counterclaim on the tap lien.

Addressing the second case, Walker Development argues that its claims are not barred by claim preclusion, as its promissory note claims were not compulsory counterclaims in the first action; the counterclaims were only permissive. The appeals court agrees. Adjudication of the claims on the promissory notes would not result in inconsistent verdicts or a deprivation of rights established in the first litigation.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Contracts, Purchase and Sale, Transactions (2)

Editor’s note: This is Part 5 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillern

By Frederick Skillern

Van Rees, Sr. v. Unleaded Software, Inc.
Colorado Court of Appeals, December 5, 2013
2013 COA 164

Economic loss rule; contract for design of website; no tort claim because no independent duty.

Although this is not a real estate case, I note it simply as an example of how the economic loss rule is spreading to preclude a wide array of fraud claims arising out of contractual relations. In this case, the court deals with the scope and applicability of Colorado’s economic loss rule in the context of an agreement for the design and maintenance of a website. Under the economic loss rule, no independent duty exists for tort claims of fraud, fraudulent concealment, constructive fraud, or negligent misrepresentation when the alleged misrepresentations and false statements are about the ability to perform contractual duties. The court affirms the trial court’s dismissal of the fraud, negligent misrepresentation, negligence, Colorado Consumer Protection Act, and civil theft claims. The breach of contract claim has it all.

 

Hickerson v. Vessels
Colorado Supreme Court, January 13, 2014
2014 CO 2.

Collections; statute of limitations; C.R.S. § 13-80-103.5 (1) (a) (six-year statute); partial payment doctrine; laches.

This case takes up the collection efforts of the holder of a $386,000 promissory note given in 1989 to the Vessels Oil Company. The note was due in ten years. Shortly after 1999, the maker started making payments on the note, and that continued for a couple of years. After payments stopped, Vessels sued to collect the entire balance. Under existing common law, which the court refers to as the partial payment doctrine, the running of the six-year statute of limitations begins anew whenever payments are made voluntarily, as the debt is recognized and acknowledged. The trial court held that the debtor should be protected under the circumstances of this case by the equitable defense of laches. The court of appeals reversed, but the Supreme Court reinstates the trial court’s ruling.

Four statutes refer to the partial payment scenario. See C.R.S. §§ 13-80-113 to 116. The court refers to these as examples of the common-law rule, and not a replacement of the rule.

In a fairly bold stroke in support of the exercise of equitable powers, the court holds that the separation of powers doctrine does not bar application of the equitable defense of laches to a debt collection action filed within the original or restarted six-year statute of limitations period. Laches does not conflict with the plain meaning of the relevant statute of limitations, nor does it conflict with the partial payment doctrine, which is a creature of Colorado common law. Since early statehood, Colorado case law has recognized the application of equitable remedies to legal claims. Accordingly, the Court reverses the judgment of the court of appeals and remands the case for consideration of issues it did not reach, to wit – does the record support a defense of laches. Maybe not.

“The essential element of laches is unconscionable delay in enforcing a right under the circumstances, usually involving a prejudice to the one against whom the claim is asserted.” The elements of laches are: (1) full knowledge of the facts; (2) unreasonable delay in the assertion of available remedy; and (3) intervening reliance by and prejudice to another. Laches requires “such unreasonable delay in the assertion of and attempted securing of equitable rights as to constitute in equity and good conscience a bar to recovery.”

The court remands the case to the court of appeals for review of whether the elements of laches are satisfied by evidence in the record. And father time marches on.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Contracts, Purchase and Sale, Transactions (1)

Editor’s note: This is Part 4 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick Skillern

Gattis v. McNutt (In re Estate of Gattis)
Colorado Court of Appeals, November 7, 2013
2013 COA 145
Residential sales contract; nondisclosure; economic loss rule
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This case presents another test of the outer limits of the economic loss rule. The buyer of a house, Carol Gattis, sues for fraudulent concealment and recovers a judgment against McNutt. McNutt’s company acquired the property to “fix and flip,” and obtained detailed soils reports outlining damage that was caused by shifting soils. On the disclosures form included in the standard form residential purchase and sale contract, McNutt disclaimed any “personal” knowledge of defects, and identified only the name of a company which had performed structural repairs — without describing the nature of the repair. McNutt appeals on the basis that the fraud claim is barred by the economic loss rule. He argues that the contract calls for specific disclosures, which were given, and that tort actions are precluded by the economic loss rule, as the requirement for disclosures “subsumes” the common-law duty to disclose material information.

The appeals court disagrees and affirms the judgment. Under the economic loss rule, “a party suffering only economic loss from the breach of an express or implied contractual duty may not assert a tort claim for such a breach absent an independent duty of care under tort law.” The court rejects the economic loss rule defense for two reasons. First, home sellers owe consumers an independent duty to disclose latent defects of which they are aware. Second, the court reasons that the disclosure provisions in the commission-approved form do not subsume the independent duty so as to trigger the economic loss rule. Although sellers were not required by the disclosure form to disclose their involvement with the entity that had performed repairs, the trial court found that this fact was material and should have been disclosed. Gattis could have prevailed on this nondisclosure claim without relying on the form disclosure. In short — the seller was perhaps “too cute by half.”

The court distinguishes two recent decisions in which a real estate seller has successfully invoked the economic loss rule to avoid a fraud claim. In those cases — Former TCHR, LLC v. First Hand Mgmt. LLC, 2012 COA 129 (Colo. App. 2012), and Hamon Contractors, Inc. v. Carter & Burgess, Inc., 229 P.3d 282 (Colo. App. 2009) — the parties negotiated “transaction-specific” contracts. Here, the parties used standard real estate commission forms. The court holds that neither the Seller’s Property Disclosure nor any other term in the form contract limits or subsumes the home sellers’ common-law duty to disclose latent defects of which they are aware.

 

Planning Partners International, LLC v. QED, Inc.
Colorado Court of Appeals, July 1, 2013.
2013 CO 43
Contracts; attorney fee shifting provision; discretion to reduce fee claim to account for successful claim for offsets; no mandatory rule.

Our supreme court accepts this case to decide a recurring issue in attorney fee hearings pursuant to contractual fee shifting provisions. The court of appeals held that the trial court erred in failing to apportion a fee award to account for an offset caused by judgment or a counterclaim. The Supreme Court rejects a per se rule of mandatory apportionment in this circumstance. Requiring proportional diminishment in all cases where the judgment based on a note or contract had been reduced by a counterclaim arising out of the transaction would undermine the trial court’s ability to determine a reasonable fee under the specific facts of the cases before them. The widely divergent circumstances under which attorney fee issues are litigated militate in favor of flexibility and discretion on the part of the trial court, rather than a rule of mandatory apportionment. In the current case, the trial judge proceeded methodically through the planning company’s accounting, discounting the fees incurred in a claim he found to be unsupported by the evidence and reducing the entire amount of requested fees by 20%. He further determined that the attorney’s fee issues were sufficiently intertwined and inter-related that apportionment was not appropriate.

The court notes that a trial court’s discretion may be circumscribed by the statute or contract giving rise to fees. It points out that the note provision here did not require or preclude apportionment, which is a factor that a drafter of such a note or contract might consider. As a result, a trial court may determine that some apportionment is necessary for a fee to be reasonable, or it may not. The court here holds only that the widely divergent circumstances under which attorney fee issues are litigated militate in favor of flexibility and discretion on the part of the trial court, rather than a rule of mandatory apportionment.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Condemnation, Eminent Domain

Editor’s note: This is Part 3 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick Skillern

Regional Transportation District v. 750 West 48th Ave, LLC
Colorado Court of Appeals, December 5, 2013
2013 COA 168
Qualification of eminent domain commissioner; partiality.

The only question for a trial to a panel of three commissioners is, in most cases, the value of property taken by the government. Three commissioners were appointed by the court, including a Cassidy Turley broker, Ms. Hook. The commissioners were approved after a 90-minute voir dire hearing in the district court. Six months later, but before trial, RTD challenged the partiality of Ms. Hook, on the basis that two other brokers in her firm had testified on value issues in a separate but similar RTD eminent domain case. The question raised here is whether the standard of review on the disqualification motion is based on the standard applicable to a judge, or a juror. The eminent domain statute, C.R.S. § 38-1-105(1), instructs the trial court to disqualify a proposed commissioner who is “not disinterested and impartial.” Under C.R.C.P. 97 and Colorado Code of Judicial Conduct Rule 1.2, by contrast, judges may be disqualified if they “appear” partial. In the latter case, courts have held that the test for appearance of partiality of a judge is whether a reasonable person, knowing all the relevant facts, would doubt the judge’s impartiality.

Applying the plain language of the eminent domain statute, the court agrees with the trial court and affirms. The applicable standard for disqualifying commissioners is not “an appearance of partiality,” a standard applicable to sitting judges, but whether the commissioner was “in fact interested and partial.” The court holds that Hook’s professional relationship with two fellow employees who had testified against RTD did not make her interested or partial.

The court comments on the special role of a condemnation commissioner: “The court relies on their experience and knowledge of the law of real estate to make the appropriate determination of just compensation. Because commissioners are supposed to bring expertise to valuation proceedings . . . they could not do so if the very knowledge and experience that made their views desirable also disqualified them.”

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Common Interest Communities, Covenants, and CCIOA

Editor’s note: This is Part 2 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick Skillern

Triple Crown at Observatory Village Association v. Village Homes of Colorado
Colorado Court of Appeals, November 7, 2013
2013 COA 150
Construction defect claims; interlocutory review; relationship between revised Nonprofit Corporation Act and the Common Interest Ownership Act.

Arising from alleged construction defects in a common interest community, this interlocutory appeal under C.A.R. 4.2 presents four questions of first impression in Colorado, which the court answers as follows:

  1. Where an association is a nonprofit corporation, the Colorado nonprofit act establishes the time limit for amending its declaration based on action taken without a meeting;
  2. The statutory power to engage in “litigation” under C.R.S. § 38-33.3-302(1)(d) includes arbitration;
  3. C.R.S. § 38-33.3-302(2) does not invalidate the mandatory arbitration provision, because the dispute resolution procedures apply to parties other than the declarant; and
  4. Colorado consumer protection act claims may be subject to mandatory arbitration, because the CCPA does not include a nonwaiver provision.

Village Homes, a residential developer, built homes subject to recorded covenants, and thereby created an association, Triple Crown. Triple Crown was set up as a nonprofit corporation under C.R.S. §§ 7-121-101, et seq. In the declaration of covenants, the developer included a dispute resolution procedure for claims arising from the design or construction of homes in the Triple Crown development. The declaration required that construction defect claims be arbitrated under American Arbitration Association rules.

In 2012, residents began a campaign to amend the declaration by repealing the arbitration clause. Unfortunately, it took more than sixty days to gather the votes to amend the covenants. After sixty days, 48% of the members had cast votes in favor of revocation. After another sixty days, the Association had obtained the required 67% of votes to effect the amendment. The Association recorded the amendment, and then brought this action against Village Homes, alleging negligent construction, Colorado Consumer Protection Act (CCPA) violations, and breach of fiduciary duties.

Village Homes moved to dismiss for lack of jurisdiction, based on the arbitration clause in the declaration. It argued that the amendment repealing the arbitration provision was ineffective because the Association failed to amend Article 14 within the time limits in the Nonprofit Corporations Act, specifically C.R.S. § 7-127-107(2), which deals with time limits for actions taken without a meeting. The trial court granted the motion, dismissed the case, and ordered the case to arbitration. This order is affirmed on appeal. The court holds that when an association amends its declaration without a meeting under the CCIOA, the association, if it is a nonprofit corporation, must comply with the 60-day time limit provided in section 7-127-107.

The Court also agreed that the Common Interest Association Act gives power to associations to “institute, defend, or intervene in litigation or administrative proceedings . . . on the matters affecting the common interest community.” However, the court reasons that “litigation” includes both civil actions in court and arbitrations. It holds that the mandatory arbitration clause did not infringe on the association’s statutory power to “institute litigation.”

The association then argues that CCIOA § 38-33.3-302(2) invalidated Article 14. The trial court rejected this argument. The court agreed with the trial court, finding that the CCIOA section forbids only restrictions unique to the declarant. Article 14 controlled disputes between all parties.

The trial court rejected the association’s argument that its CCPA claims should not be subject to mandatory arbitration, because CCPA provisions by statute “shall be available in a civil action.” The court holds that such a right can be waived, and that Article 14 of the Triple Crown declaration was such a waiver.

 

Ryan Ranch Community Assn., Inc. v. Kelley
Colorado Court of Appeals, March 27, 2014
2014 COA 37M
Liability for homeowner association assessments; annexation; developer side agreement.

This is an interesting situation involving a developer, a side agreement with another landowner to exempt that owner’s land from subdivision covenants, and the annexation provisions of the CCIOA. As a prequel, the following general principles stated in the dissent by Judge Terry set the stage.

  • “Provisions of this article may not be varied by agreement. . . . A declarant may not . . . use any . . . device to evade the limitations or prohibitions of this article or the declaration.” C.R.S. § 38-33.3-104. . . .
  • Members are not “entitled to set up agreements reached with the developer as defenses to the obligation to pay assessments . . . . [T]he developer does not have the power to waive the assessment obligations imposed on property within the common-interest community.” Restatement (Third) of Property: Servitudes, 6.5, cmt. e (2000).

Nice notions, but the developer here found the approval process for a second filing of his development sometimes required some last-minute adjustments. He had a side agreement with Kelley, an owner of a minority of land to be included in a second filing of a large development, to keep the “Kelley Lots” from control of any covenants or new HOAs. At the late stages of approval of the new filing, however, the developer included Kelley’s land in the filing – Kelley signed the plat – and sold the lots in bulk to Ryland.

Ryland, going along with the deal, sold the Kelley lots immediately back to developer, and the developer then deeded the land to Kelley. Kelley sold the lots to another builder, who sold homes to consumers. Several years go by, during which the consumers enjoy neighborhood improvements, and then the HOA takes action to collect assessments – including back fees totaling $70,000. The homeowners had constructive notice of the plat and the declaration from exceptions to their deed warranties. In defense, the homeowners and Kelley argued that their lots had not been appropriately “annexed” into the association. The decision goes through the statutes, and two judges reverse the trial court and hold that the requirements for annexation had not been met.

The reasoning of the majority goes like this. To exercise a development right under CCIOA, a developer must comply with the plat and map requirements of C.R.S. § 38-33.3-209 and the recording requirements of C.R.S. § 38-33.3-217(3). The homeowner defendants argue that to exercise a reserved development right, CCIOA requires the recording of an amendment to the declaration that must contain certain information and be properly indexed. The court agrees that the recording of an Official Development Plan and the declaration was not sufficient to meet these requirements. The original declaration cannot logically be considered an amendment to itself such that it could annex the Kelley Lots. Moreover, nothing was denominated as an amendment, nothing assigned identifying numbers to newly created units, there was no reallocation of interests among all units, and no common elements were described. Nothing on the Filing 2 plat map subjected the described property to the Declaration.

On the other hand, the dissent notes, the Declaration provides that the additional lots will be annexed into the HOA when (1) a plat for additional properties to be annexed is recorded, and (2) either an annexation form is recorded, or a deed for real property within the plat is conveyed from Ryland to a third party other than Ryland. “On November 17, 2005, Ryland recorded the Filing 2 plat, which included the Kelley Lots. On December 20, 2005, Ryland conveyed the Kelley Lots back to the developer by deed. These two actions — filing of the plat and conveyance by deed — fulfilled the requirements of the Declaration to annex real property to the HOA.”

CCIOA fans and developers’ counsel will want to dive into this discussion — and avoid those shortcuts.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.