June 20, 2018

Nicholas Catanzarite Appointed to Grand County Court

nickOn Tuesday, January 6, 2015, Lieutenant Governor Joe Garcia announced the appointment of Nicholas Catanzarite to the Grand County Court bench in the Fourteenth Judicial District. Catanzarite will fill a vacancy created by the non-retention of Hon. Ben McClelland in the 2014 mid-term election. The appointment is effective January 13, 2015

Catanzarite is currently an attorney at Peters Mair Wilcox in Winter Park, where he primarily practices criminal defense with an emphasis on alcohol and drug offenses. He has worked at Peters Mair Wilcox since being admitted to the Colorado bar in 2012. Prior to law school, Catanzarite was a member of the U.S. Disabled Ski Team for eight years. He is a three-time paralympian, and was awarded the Willy Schaeffler Scholarship for a disabled scholar-athlete to attend DU from 2007-2011. During law school, Catanzarite worked at DU’s renowned civil rights legal clinic as a student attorney.

For more information about the appointment, click here.

Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions and Supreme Court Nominating Commission Announced

On Wednesday, December 31, 2014, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced appointments of several people to judicial nominating commissions throughout the state, and to the Supreme Court Nominating Commission.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for evaluating and recommending candidates for judicial vacancies in their respective judicial districts. They are comprised of seven members and one non-voting supreme court justice (the ex officio chair), of which no more than four members can be of the same political party and no more than three can be admitted to practice law in Colorado. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission evaluates and recommends candidates for vacancies on the Colorado Court of Appeals and the Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of two people from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, one of whom may be admitted to practice law in Colorado and one of whom may not.

The following individuals were appointed to the judicial and Supreme Court nominating commissions:

Supreme Court Nominating Commission: 

  • Shannon Stevenson of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from the Second Congressional District.

Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Larry McGee of Canon City, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Fremont County.
  • Herbert Phillips of Alma, to serve as a Republican attorney from Park County.
  • Margaret Walker of Nathrop, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Chaffee County.

Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • James Stimson of Steamboat Springs, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Routt County.

Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Chris Rundell of Lamar, to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Prowers County.

Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Josh Marks of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.
  • Jodi Martin of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.

Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Sharon Ann Lyons Hanson of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Montezuma County.
  • Daniel Porter of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic non-attorney from Montezuma County.

All of the appointments are effective January 1, 2015, to serve six-year terms expiring December 31, 2020. For more information about the appointments, click here, and for more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Application Period Open for Grand County Court Vacancy

On Thursday, November 6, 2014, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced a vacancy on the Grand County Court bench, effective January 13, 2015. The vacancy was created because Judge Ben McClelland was not retained by a majority of voters in the 2014 general election.

Eligible applicants for the vacancy must be qualified electors of Grand County and must have graduated high school or attained the equivalent of a high school education. Application forms are available from Justice Monica Marquez, the ex officio chair of the Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission, and are also available from State Judicial’s website. Applications must be received by the ex officio chair no later than 4 p.m. on December 5, 2014. Anyone wishing to nominate another person for the judgeship must do so no later than 4 p.m. on November 28, 2014.

For more information about the judicial vacancy, click here.

Application Period Open for Judicial Nominating Commission Vacancies

The Colorado State Judicial Branch announced on Monday, September 8, 2014, that several of the state’s judicial district nominating commissions, as well as the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, will have vacancies as of December 31, 2014. Applications are available on the State of Colorado Boards and Commissions application page, and may only be submitted online on that page. Applications will be accepted through October 31, 2014.

The following nominating commissions will have vacancies:

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – one vacancy for an attorney in the Second Congressional District.
  • Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission – three vacancies, two for attorneys and one for a non-attorney. No more than two appointees may be registered Democrats.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – two attorney vacancies. No more than one appointee may be a registered Republican.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy. The appointee may not be a registered Republican.

For more information about the judicial nominating commissions, click here. For the application page, click here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to the judicial nominating commissions for the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Second judicial districts.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that selects nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies. The nominating commissions are comprised of  seven citizens residing in that judicial district. No more than four members can be from the same political party, and there must be at least one voting member from each county in the district. The members serve six-year terms.

For a complete list of the appointed members and information regarding their residence, affiliation, and the duration of their terms, click here or visit the governor’s website. Information about the judicial nominating commissions and an application for consideration for appointment may be found here.

Brett Barkey Appointed as New District Attorney in Fourteenth Judicial District

On Monday, August 13, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper appointed Brett Barkey as district attorney in the Fourteenth Judicial District, which covers Moffat, Routt, and Grand counties.

Barkey is now the assistant district attorney in the Fourteenth Judicial District. He will replace Elizabeth Oldham, who resigned earlier this month to take a job as senior deputy district attorney in Arapahoe County.

Barkey had a distinguished career in the U.S. Marines and served as legal counsel to senior U.S. commanders during three tours of duty in Iraq. He joined the District Attorney’s Office in the Fourteenth Judicial District in August 2011 after an earlier stint as the chief deputy district attorney in Craig. He is a fourth-generation Coloradan and now lives in Hayden.

Barkey earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Denver and his law degree from Georgetown University.

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints New Members to Two Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, June 21, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments, including appointments to the Fourteenth and Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The member appointed to the Fourteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • David M. Jones of Kremmling, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Grand County.

The members appointed to the Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Douglas P. Erler of Greeley, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Weld County.
  • Joseph J. Tennessen of Greeley, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Weld County.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Several Judicial Nominating Commission Appointments

On Thursday, April 12, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several appointments to various Judicial Nominating Commissions. The appointments are to the Fourth, Ninth, Twelfth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions and the Supreme Court Judicial Nominating Commission.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts each have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The member appointed to the Fourth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017 is:

  • Kenneth Michael Valdez of Colorado Springs, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from El Paso County.

The members appointed to the Ninth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017 are:

  • Sharon Merlene Day of Meeker, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Rio Blanco County.
  • Anna Smith of Meeker, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Rio Blanco County.
  • Julie Goldstein of Basalt, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Pitkin County.

The member appointed to the Twelfth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017 is:

  • Kimberly A. Lookis of San Luis, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Costilla County.

The member appointed to the Fourteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017 is:

  • Kelly Lee Weimer of Granby, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Grand County.

The members appointed to the Fifteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017 are:

  • Staci Faye Bishop of Springfield, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Baca County.
  • Linda Rae Lusk of Springfield, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Baca County.
  • Christian Paul Tallman of Brandon, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Cheyenne County.

The member appointed to the Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring November 30, 2013 is:

  • Donna Sapienza of Greeley, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Weld County.

The member appointed to the Twentieth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017 is:

  • Rex Thomas Moody of Longmont, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Boulder County.

The Supreme Court Judicial Nominating Commission recommends candidates to serve as judges for the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. The chief justice of the Supreme Court chairs the commission and is a non-voting member. This commission includes one citizen admitted to practice law in Colorado and one citizen not admitted to practice law residing in each of the state’s seven congressional districts, and one additional citizen not admitted to practice law in Colorado. The members appointed for terms expiring December 31, 2017:

  • Ann Elizabeth Hendrickson of Broomfield, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Broomfield County.
  • Olivia Mendoza of Lakewood, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Jefferson County.

Click here to read the full announcement from the Governor’s Office.

Application Period Open for Forty-Five Vacancies on Judicial Nominating Commissions

On behalf of Governor John Hickenlooper, Attorney General John Suthers, and Chief Justice Michael L. Bender, the Colorado Judicial Branch announced on Thursday, September 15, 2011, the opening of the application period for forty-five vacancies on judicial nominating commissions across the state.

Some positions are open now, but the majority of vacancies will occur when current commissioners’ six-year terms end December 31, 2011. All commissioners serve as volunteers. Applications are due on or before October 14.

Thirty-two vacancies must be filled by non-attorneys selected by the Governor. Thirteen vacancies must be filled by attorneys selected by joint action of the Governor, Attorney General, and Chief Justice. Vacancies will occur in twenty judicial district nominating commissions.

Each judicial district in Colorado has a nominating commission comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys who are tasked with selecting nominees for appointment to county and district judgeships. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is made up of seven attorneys, seven non-attorneys, and one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven Congressional Districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, which selects nominees for positions on the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals.

Application forms for vacancies on the various commissions can be found here. Completed application forms should be mailed to Romaine Pacheco, Governor’s Office of Boards and Commissions, 136 State Capitol Bldg., Denver, Colorado 80203.  They also can be faxed to (303) 866-6368 or sent by e-mail to boards@state.co.us.

Article VI, Section 24 of the Colorado Constitution requires that for any nominating commission, “no more than one-half of the commission members plus one, exclusive of the Supreme Court justice serving as ex officio chair, shall be members of the same political party.” The Constitution also requires that at least one commissioner reside in each of the counties of the district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district – or, for the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, the congressional district – to which they are applying for appointment.

Here is a list of upcoming nominating commission attorney vacancies along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • First Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have two non-attorney vacancies. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Seventh Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must reside in Ouray County.
  • Ninth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have three non-attorney vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Supreme Court: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of the Fifth Congressional District.

Here is a list of non-attorney vacancies, along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • Second Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Third Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: Two vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Eighth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must not be a registered Democrat.
  • Ninth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. At least one appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Tenth Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Eleventh Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twelfth Judicial District: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Mineral County and one a resident of Costilla County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither appointee may be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of Dolores County.
  • Supreme Court: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of the Second Congressional District and the other a resident of the Seventh Congressional District.

Click here to read the full release about the commission vacancies from State Judicial.

Eighth and Fourteenth Judicial Districts Seeking Attorneys to Represent Indigent Respondent Parents and Mental Health Patients

The Eighth and Fourteenth Judicial Districts are seeking qualified attorneys to provide legal counsel for indigent respondent parents in dependency and neglect actions and indigent respondents in mental health cases. Basic contract fees and compensation are offered for each appointment in the coming fiscal year (July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012).

For those interested in seeking appointment to such cases, the new information and application materials can be found at the Eighth Judicial District and Fourteenth Judicial District websites, or below.

8th Judicial District

14th Judicial District