June 23, 2018

Bills Signed Regarding Ground Water Commission Approval of Aquifer Storage and Recovery Plans, Repealing Procedures to Fill Municipal Vacancies, and More

On Monday, April 9, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 12 bills into law. To date, he has signed 126 bills into law and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Monday include a bill to increase transparency in higher education statutes concerning military service, a bill repealing procedures to fill vacancies in candidate nominations for municipal elections, a bill allowing the Colorado Oil and Gas Commission to roll-over its year-end balances in order to facilitate financing, and more. The bills signed Monday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-107 – “Concerning the Repeal of Procedures to Fill Vacancies in Candidate Nominations for Elections Conducted under the ‘Colorado Municipal Code of 1965,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the process by which a vacancy in nomination may be filled for an election conducted under the ‘Colorado Municipal Code of 1965’ and makes conforming amendments.
  • HB 18-1098 – “Concerning the Expanded Ability of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to Finance the Remediation of Oil and Gas Locations,” by Reps. Lori Saine & Matt Gray and Sen. Vicki Marble. Under current practice, expenditures by the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission to address the mitigation of adverse environmental impacts of oil and gas operations are paid from the environmental response account of the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund, and the year-end balance of the account transfers into the fund. The bill specifies that the year-end balance of the account remains in the account.
  • HB 18-1112 – “Concerning Covered Health Care Services Provided by a Pharmacist,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Daneya Esgar and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires a health benefit plan to provide coverage for health care services provided by a pharmacist if the services are provided within a health professional shortage area and the health benefit plan provides coverage for the same services provided by a licensed physician or advanced practice nurse.
  • HB 18-1134 – “Concerning Eligibility of Kindergarten Students Funded through Early Childhood At-risk Enhancement Positions,” by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson and Sens. Michael Merrifield & Beth Martinez Humenik. If a district chooses to use early childhood at-risk enhancement (ECARE) positions to enroll children in the district’s full-day kindergarten program, children using the ECARE positions must satisfy at least one of the eligibility requirements of the Colorado preschool program.
  • HB 18-1145 – “Concerning the Repeal of Laws Regulating Ballot Issue Petition Circulators that have been Permanently Enjoined from Enforcement,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals laws ordered permanently enjoined from enforcement in Independence Inst. v. Gessler , 936 F. Supp. 2d 1256 (D. Colo. 2013).
  • HB 18-1148 – “Concerning the Prohibition Against a Carrier Requiring Step Therapy for Covered Persons with Stage Four Advanced Metastatic Cancer,” by Rep. Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill prohibits a carrier that issues a health benefit plan that covers treatment for stage four advanced metastatic cancer from requiring a cancer patient to undergo step therapy prior to receiving a drug approved by the United States food and drug administration if use of the approved drug is consistent with best practices for treatment of the cancer and as long as the drug is on the carrier’s prescription drug formulary.
  • HB 18-1172 – “Concerning Money Allocated from an Appropriation from the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund to a Designated Managed Service Organization to Implement its Community Action Plan,” by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill amends the ‘Increasing Access to Effective Substance Use Disorder Services Act’ to clarify that a designated managed service organization (designated MSO) may use money allocated to it from the marijuana tax cash fund for expenditures for substance use disorder services and for any start-up costs or other expenses necessary to increase capacity to provide such services and may allow allocations to roll forward.
  • HB 18-1199 – “Concerning a Process for the Ground Water Commission to Use for Approving Aquifer Storage-and-Recovery Plans, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring that the Ground Water Commission Promulgate Rules Governing its Implementation of the Process,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill authorizes a person to apply to the ground water commission (commission) for approval of an aquifer storage-and-recovery plan and requires the commission to promulgate rules governing the application process and the requirements that an aquifer storage-and-recovery plan must meet to be approved.
  • HB 18-1228 – “Concerning Increasing Transparency in Higher Education Statutes Relating to Military Service,” by Reps. Justin Everett & Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sen. Leroy Garcia. The bill creates a new article 7.4 in title 23, Colorado Revised Statutes, with the article heading ‘Military Members, Veterans, and Dependents’, in order to locate physically within the same article, whenever practicable, higher education provisions relating to the military.
  • HB 18-1238 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Wildland-Urban Interface Training Advisory Board, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2017 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Dominique Jackson & Marc Catlin and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill implements the recommendation of the Department of Regulatory Agencies to sunset the wildland-urban interface training advisory board.
  • HB 18-1246 – “Concerning Updates to the “Colorado Nursery Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Modernizing the Act and Protecting Agriculture from Pests, Diseases, and Noxious Weeds,” by Rep. Jessie Danielson and Sen. Don Coram. The bill updates the ‘Colorado Nursery Act’, last amended in 2009, to protect nursery stock.
  • HB 18-1293 – “Concerning Payment of Expenses of the Legislative Department,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Patrick Neville and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Lucia Guzman. The bill makes appropriations for matters related to the legislative department for the 2018-19 state fiscal year.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Supreme Court: Only Privilege-Holder Can Waive Physician-Patient Privilege, and Only By Injecting Condition Into Case

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Gadeco, LLC v. Grynberg on Monday, April 9, 2018.

Physician-Patient Privilege—Implied Waiver.

In this original proceeding, the supreme court considered whether the trial court abused its discretion when it found that defendant impliedly waived the physician-patient privilege as to his mental health records by asserting counterclaims for breach of contract, requesting specific performance, and denying the opposing parties’ allegations. The court affirmed its rule that only privilege holders—patients—can impliedly waive the physician-patient privilege, and they do so by injecting their physical or mental condition into the case as the basis of a claim or an affirmative defense. Correspondingly, an adverse party cannot place a patient’s mental condition at issue through its defenses, nor can a privilege holder do so by denying an adverse party’s allegations. Applying those rules, the court held that defendant did not waive the physician-patient privilege through his counterclaims or answer. The court concluded that the trial court abused its discretion by ordering defendant to produce his medical records for in camera review and made the rule to show cause absolute.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Bills Signed Regarding Fiduciary Duties of Title Insurance Entities, Public Official Oaths and Affirmations, and More

On Thursday, March 29, 2018, the governor signed 17 bills into law. He also signed 16 bills into law on Monday, April 2, 2018. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 114 bills this legislative session and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday and Monday include a bill concerning the fiduciary duties of title insurance entities with regard to funds held for closing, a bill exempting physicians who treat patients with rare disorders from non-compete agreements, several bills updating outdated statutory language, bills regarding financing broadband for rural areas, a bill requiring reporting when title to a motor vehicle has been transferred, and more. The bills signed Thursday and Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1012 – “Concerning Vision Care Plans for Eye Care Services,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Susan Lontine and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Irene Aguilar. The bill prohibits a carrier or entity that offers a vision care plan from requiring an eye care provider with whom the carrier or entity contracts to provide services at a set fee, charge a person for noncovered services, or participate in a carrier’s other vision plan networks.
  • HB 18-1091 – “Concerning Dementia Diseases, and, in Connection Therewith, Updating Statutory References to Dementia Diseases and Related Disabilities,” by Reps. Susan Beckman & Joann Ginal and Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd. The bill updates statutory references to Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases and reflects that dementia diseases have related disabilities impacting memory and other cognitive abilities.
  • HB 18-1099 – “Concerning Criteria that the Broadband Deployment Board is Required to Develop with Regard to an Incumbent Telecommunications Provider’s Exercise of a Right to Implement a Broadband Deployment Project in an Unserved Area of the State Upon a Nonincumbent Provider’s Application to the Broadband Deployment Board to Implement a Proposed Broadband Deployment Project in the Unserved Area,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires that the Broadband Deployment Board’s criteria include requirements that an incumbent telecommunications provider exercising its right to implement a broadband deployment project for the unserved area agree to provide demonstrated downstream and upstream speeds equal to or faster than the speeds indicated in the applicant’s proposed project and at a cost per household that is equal to or less than the cost per household indicated in the applicant’s proposed project.
  • HB 18-1103 – “Concerning the Ability of a Local Government to Require a Driver to Meet Safety Standards for the Use of an Off-highway Vehicle,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill clarifies that a local government does not violate state rules if it imposes certain requirements on a driver of an off-highway vehicle.
  • HB 18-1130 – “Concerning Increasing the Availability of Qualified Personnel who are Licensed in Another State to Teach in Public Schools,” by Reps. Dave Williams & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill changes requirements for special education teacher requirements from 3 years of continuous experience to 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1137 – “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports to the General Assembly, and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Requirements for Reports by the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill continues reporting requirements of the Departments of Transportation and Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1138 – “Concerning Standardizing Public Official Oaths of Office, and, in Connection Therewith, Providing a Uniform Oath Text and Establishing Requirements for Taking, Subscribing, Administering, and Filing Public Oaths of Office,” by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill establishes a single uniform text for swearing or affirming an oath of office and the requirements regarding how and when an oath or affirmation of office must be taken, subscribed, administered, and filed.
  • HB 18-1139 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated Statutory References to Repealed Reporting Requirements that were Previously Imposed on the Parks and Wildlife Commission with Regard to its Rule-making Authority to Set Fees,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes obsolete references to a statutory subsection that was repealed on September 1, 2017.
  • HB 18-1158 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Corrections.
  • HB 18-1171 – “Concerning Adjustments in the Amount of Total Program Funding for Public Cchools for the 2017-18 Budget Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill adjusts the minimum amount of total program funding specified in statute to reflect this intent for the actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count.
  • HB 18-1196 – “Concerning Authorization to Verify the Disability of an Applicant to the Aid to the Needy Disabled Program,” by Rep. Tony Exum and Sens. Nancy Todd & Beth Martinez Humenik. Under current law, in order to receive assistance under the aid to the needy disabled program, an applicant must be examined by a physician, physician assistant, advanced practice nurse, or registered nurse. The bill adds to the list of persons authorized to perform an examination a licensed psychologist, or any other licensed or certified health care personnel the department of human services deems appropriate.
  • HB 18-1233 – “Concerning a Consumer Reporting Agency’s Placement of a Security Freeze on the Consumer Report of a Consumer who is Under the Charge of a Representative at the Request of the Consumer’s Representative,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes a parent or legal guardian (representative) to request that a consumer reporting agency place a security freeze on the consumer report of either a minor less than 16 years of age or another individual who is a ward of the representative (protected consumer).
  • SB 18-002 – “Concerning the Financing of Broadband Deployment,” by Sens. Don Coram & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. KC Becker & Crisanta Duran. The bill amends the definition of ‘broadband network’ to increase the speed of downstream broadband internet service from at least 4 megabits per second to at least 10 megabits per second and the definition of ‘unserved area’ to refer to an area that is unincorporated, or within a city with a population of fewer than 7,500 inhabitants, and that is not receiving federal support to construct a broadband network to serve a majority of the households in each census block in the area, and requires the PUC to allocate money.
  • SB 18-028 – “Concerning the Repeal of Certain Requirements for Where a License Plate is Mounted on a Motor Vehicle,” by Sen. Ray Scott and Rep. Jeff Bridges. Current law requires each license plate to be at the approximate center of a motor vehicle and at least 12 inches from the ground. The bill repeals this requirement for the front license plate and replaces it with a requirement that the front license plate be mounted horizontally on the front in the location designated by the manufacturer.
  • SB 18-073 – “Concerning Reporting to the Department of Revenue when Ownership of a Motor Vehicle has been Transferred,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. Kim Ransom & Leslie Herod. The bill creates a voluntary program administered by the Department of Revenue that authorizes the owner of a motor vehicle to report a transfer of ownership of the motor vehicle. If the previous owner reports the transfer to the Department, the previous owner is not subject to liability for the misuse of the vehicle.
  • SB 18-074 – “Concerning Adding Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome to the List of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,” by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Chris Hansen. The bill adds Prader-Willi syndrome to the list of persons who have mandatory eligibility for services and supports and also to the definition of an ‘intellectual and developmental disability’ for the purpose of receiving services and supports.
  • SB 18-082 – “Concerning a Physician’s Right to Provide Continuing Care to Patients with Rare Disorders Despite a Covenant Not to Compete,” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Sen. Chris Kennedy. The bill exempts physicians who provide care to patients with rare diseases from non-compete agreements.
  • SB 18-090 – “Concerning ‘Rights of Married Women,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections concerning the “rights of married women” to be inclusive of married men and women.
  • SB 18-095 – “Concerning the Removal of Statutory References to the Marital Status of Parents of a Child,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Edie Hooten & Hugh McKean. The bill removes or modernizes outdated statutory references to a ‘legitimate’ or ‘illegitimate’ child and a ‘child born out of wedlock’. Colorado only recognizes parentage of a child and acknowledges that the parent and child relationship extends equally to every child and every parent, regardless of the marital status of the parents.
  • SB 18-098 – “Concerning Amending a Statutory Provision Relating to Interest on Damages that was Ruled Unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill amends C.R.S. § 13-21-101 (1), concerning interest on damages, to reflect a 1996 decision made by the Colorado Supreme Court that ruled certain language in that subsection violated the equal protection clause of the constitution.
  • SB 18-099 – “Concerning the Alignment of Early Childhood Quality Improvement Programs with the Colorado Shines Quality Rating and Improvement System,” by Sens. Michael Merrifield & Kevin Priola and Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson. The bill amends the application and eligibility requirements for the school-readiness quality improvement program and the infant and toddler quality and availability grant program to align with the Colorado shines quality rating and improvement system to streamline the administration of the programs.
  • SB 18-102 – “Concerning the Requirement for an Odometer Reading when a Motor Vehicle’s Identification Number is Physically Verified,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the requirement that the odometer be read when a motor vehicle’s identification number is physically verified.
  • SB 18-104 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Broadband Deployment Board File a Petition with the Federal Communications Commission to Seek a Waiver from the Commission’s Rules Prohibiting a State Entity from Applying for Certain Federal Money Earmarked for Financing Broadband Deployment in Remote Areas of the Nation,” by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Barbara McLaughlin. The bill requires the broadband deployment board, on or before January 1, 2019, to petition the federal communications commission (FCC) for a waiver from the FCC’s rules prohibiting a state entity from applying for federal money earmarked for broadband deployment in remote areas of the nation through the remote areas fund created as part of the connect America fund established by the FCC.
  • SB 18-111 – “Concerning the Removal of an Obsolete Date in the Law that Designates State Legal Holidays,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law specifies that if executive branch employees who are in the state personnel system are required to work on a state legal holiday, the employees shall receive an alternate day off or be paid in accordance with the state personnel system or state fiscal rules in effect on April 30, 1979. The state fiscal rules in effect in 1979 have been amended numerous times since that time and are no longer applicable or relevant. The bill removes the reference to April 30, 1979.
  • SB 18-121 – “Concerning Certain Expenses Allowed to a State Employee when the Employee is Required to Change his or her Place of Residence in Connection with a Change in Job Duties,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law allows an employee in the state personnel system his or her moving and relocation expenses if an appointing authority requires the employee to change his or her place of residence due to a change in job duties. The bill specifies that moving expenses, including the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects and the reasonable costs of traveling to a new residence, are reimbursable in accordance with rules promulgated by the state controller and in compliance with the regulations of the federal internal revenue service.
  • SB 18-125 – “Concerning Fiduciary Responsibilities of Title Insurance Entities to Protect Funds held in Conjunction with Real Estate Closing Settlement Services,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Daniel Kagan and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill requires title insurance entities and affiliates or subsidiaries to hold funds belonging to others in a fiduciary capacity. ‘Fiduciary funds’ means all funds received in conjunction with real estate closing and settlement services.
  • SB 18-131 – “Concerning Modifications to the “State Employees Group Benefits Act,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modifies several provisions of the State Employees Group Benefits Act to bring it into compliance with current state and federal law and to eliminate obsolete provisions.
  • SB 18-134 – “Concerning the Exemption of Nonprofit Water Companies from Regulation by the Public Utilities Commission,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Under current law, the public utilities commission is directed to grant simplified regulatory treatment to water companies that serve fewer than 1,500 customers. The bill expands on this concept by deregulating water companies that are registered as nonprofits, so long as their rates, charges, and terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable.
  • SB 18-135 – “Concerning Updates to the Colorado Code of Military Justice,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Terri Carver & Pete Lee. The bill updates several parts of the Colorado Code of Military Justice.
  • SB 18-138 – “Concerning Authorization for Retail Sellers of Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption to Sell Remaining Inventory to Another On-premises Retail Seller of Alcohol Beverages with whom there is Common Ownership when No Longer Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Andy Kerr and Reps. Matt Gray & Larry Liston. The bill allows persons with certain retail licenses to purchase alcohol beverages from another retail licensee when there is common ownership between the licensees and the seller has surrendered its license within the last 60 days.
  • SB 18-160 – “Concerning the Authority to Operate Certain Teacher Development Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing Alternative Licensure Programs and Induction Programs,” by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. Under existing law, school districts are permitted to operate induction programs for teachers, special services providers, principals, and administrators, and alternative licensure programs for teachers and principals, who do not hold professional licenses. The bill clarifies that charter schools and the state charter school institute may operate such programs.
  • SB 18-165 – “Concerning Requirements for Public Administrators,” by Sens. Tim Neville & Nancy Todd and Reps. Faith Winter & Lori Saine. The bill The bill increases the amount of bond public administrators are required to maintain to $100,000 and clarifies additional requirements.
  • SB 18-173 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Establishments Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption that Serve Food to Allow a Customer to Remove One Opened Container of Partially Consumed Vinous Liquor from the Licensed Premises,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Leslie Herod. Currently, certain liquor licensees may sell one opened container of partially consumed vinous liquor to a customer if the licensee has meals available for consumption on the licensed premises. The bill expands the requirement to include licensees that makes sandwiches and light snacks available for consumption on the premises.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: District Courts Must Exercise Reasonable Discretion in Determining the Person for Substituted Service

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Minshall v. Johnston on Thursday, March 22, 2018.

C.R.C.P. 4(f)Substituted ServiceDefault Judgment.

The Minshalls filed a complaint against Johnston. Johnston was not personally served with process; instead, the court permitted substitute service under C.R.C.P. 4(f) on the registered agent of Aries Staffing LLC (Aries), a corporation of which Johnston was a co-owner and shareholder. The district court entered a default judgment against Johnston when he failed to respond to the complaint. Six months after he claimed he learned of the default judgment, Johnston moved pro se to set it aside, arguing that he was not properly served with process. The district court denied the motion.

On appeal, Johnston argued that the judgment against him is void for lack of jurisdiction. He contended that the Minshalls did not exercise due diligence in attempting to serve Johnston personally, which was a necessary condition precedent to serving him by substituted service. It was undisputed that the Minshalls complied with the procedural requirements of Rule 4(f) by filing an affidavit from the process server detailing his numerous unsuccessful attempts to serve Johnston. They also documented numerous other ways they tried to locate and serve Johnston. The record supports the district court’s finding that the Minshalls met the due diligence requirement of the rule.

Johnston also argued that substituted service on Aries’ registered agent, Incorp Services, Inc., was not reasonably calculated to give him actual notice of the suit. The court of appeals found no authority supporting the proposition that service on a registered agent of a corporation is sufficient, by itself, to effectuate valid service on a “co-owner” of a corporation. Here, there was no indication in the record of a separate relationship between Incorp and Johnston or other facts that would support the required finding under Rule 4(f).

The order was vacated. The case was remanded for a determination as to whether service on Incorp under Rule 4(f) was reasonably calculated to give actual notice to Johnston.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Bills Modernizing Statutory Language, Requiring Rent Receipts from Landlords, and More Signed

On Thursday, March 22, 2018, the governor signed 25 bills into law. He also sent one  bill to the Secretary of State without a signature on Friday. To date, he has signed 81 bills and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday include several bills modernizing and clarifying statutory language, as well as a bill requiring residential landlords to issue rent receipts, a bill adding two types of protection orders, and more. The bills signed Thursday and passed on Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-005 – “Concerning Economic Assistance for Rural Communities Experiencing Certain Significant Economic Events that Lead to Substantial Job Loss in those Communities, and, in Connection Therewith, Authorizing the Department of Local Affairs to Coordinate Nonmonetary Assistance to Assist Rural Communities with Job Creation or Retention,” by Sens. Kerry Donovan & Ray Scott and Rep. Dylan Roberts. The bill authorizes the Executive Director of the Department of Local Affairs (Executive Director) or the Executive Director’s designee to coordinate the provision of nonmonetary resources to assist with job retention or creation in a rural community experiencing a significant economic event, such as a plant closure or layoffs, including industry-wide layoffs, that has a significant, quantifiable impact on jobs within that community.
  • SB 18-009 – “Concerning the Right of Consumers of Electricity to Interconnect Energy Storage Systems for Use on their Property,” by Sens. Kevin Priola & Stephen Fenberg and Reps. Faith Winter & Polly Lawrence. The bill declares that consumers of electricity have a right to install, interconnect, and use energy storage systems on their property, and that this will enhance the reliability and efficiency of the electric grid, save money, and reduce the need for additional electric generation facilities.
  • SB 18-010 – “Concerning the Requirement that a Residential Landlord Provide a Tenant with Specified Documents Relevant to the Landlord-Tenant Relationship, and, in Connection Therewith, Specifying Rent Receipts and Copies of any Written Lease Agreement as Documents that Must be Provided,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Angela Williams and Rep. Tony Exum. The bill requires a residential landlord to provide each tenant with a copy of a written rental agreement signed by the parties and to give a tenant a contemporaneous receipt for any payment made in person with cash or a money order. For payments not made in person with cash or a money order, the landlord must provide a receipt if the tenant requests it.
  • SB 18-020 – “Concerning Mental Health Care Professionals who are Permitted to Perform Auricular Acudetox,” by Sen. Leroy Garcia and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill allows registered psychotherapists who have documented that they have undergone auricular acudetox training to perform auricular acudetox.
  • SB 18-046 – “Concerning Authorization to Increase the Minimum Donation Required to be Issued a Certificate that Qualifies a Person to be Issued a Group Special License Plate,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Faith Winter. The bill authorizes nonprofit organizations to increase by $10 the minimum donation for the issuance of special license plates.
  • SB 18-060 – “Concerning Protective Orders in Criminal Cases,” by Sen. Don Coram and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill adds 2 new potential protection orders to the list of options available to the court. They are an order prohibiting the taking, transferring, concealing, harming, disposing of, or threatening to harm an animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by the alleged victim or witness; and an order directing a wireless telephone service provider to transfer the financial responsibility for and rights to a wireless telephone number or numbers to the alleged victim or witness if the alleged victim or witness satisfies certain criteria.
  • SB 18-069 – “Concerning Enforcement of Statewide Degree Transfer Agreements,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Alec Garnett & Jon Becker. If an institution of higher education admits as a junior a transfer student who holds an associate of arts degree, associate of applied science degree, or an associate of science degree that is the subject of a statewide degree transfer agreement, the institution shall not require the student to complete any additional courses to fulfill general education requirements.
  • SB 18-093 – “Concerning the Repeal of Obsolete Provisions in the Colorado Medical Assistance Program Relating to the Inactive Home- and Community-Based Services Waiver for Persons Living with AIDS,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill repeals the inactive home- and community-based services waiver under the Colorado medical assistance program for persons with health complexes related to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (persons living with AIDS waiver).
  • SB 18-101 – “Concerning Student Admission to Colorado State University – Global Campus,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Nancy Todd and Reps. Millie Hamner & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill removes a prohibition on admitting first-time freshman baccalaureate students who reside in Colorado and who are under 23 years of age.
  • HB 18-1005 – “Concerning Notice of Postsecondary Course Enrollment Options Available to High School Students,” by Reps. Brittany Petterson & Jon Becker and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill requires a notice to students and parents of postsecondary course opportunities to include information regarding the local education provider’s timelines that affect student eligibility to take these courses and a statement informing students that they may significantly reduce college expenses, increase the likelihood of completing college, and earn marketable workforce skills by taking concurrent enrollment courses.
  • HB 18-1023 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Legalized Marijuana from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the statutes related to legalized marijuana from Title 12 to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1032 – “Concerning Access to Medical Records from the Department of Public Health and Environment’s EMS Agency Patient Care Database by Health Information Organization Networks,” by Reps. Chris Kennedy & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Rhonda Fields & Jack Tate. The bill requires the Department of Public Health and Environment to provide individualized patient information from the department’s EMS agency patient care database to health information organization networks for any use allowed under the federal “Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.”
  • HB 18-1045 – “Concerning the Application of Silver Diamine Fluoride to Dental Patients,” by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill allows a dental hygienist to apply silver diamine fluoride under the direct or indirect supervision of a dentist.
  • HB 18-1050 – “Concerning Competency to Proceed for Juveniles Involved in the Juvenile Justice System,” by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Rhonda Fields. The bill establishes a juvenile-specific definition of ‘competent to proceed’ and ‘incompetent to proceed’ for juveniles involved in the juvenile justice system, as well as specific definitions for ‘developmental disability’, ‘mental capacity’, and ‘mental disability’ when used in this context. The bill clarifies the procedures for establishing incompetency, as well as for establishing the restoration of competency.
  • HB 18-1051 – “Concerning Statutory Provisions Enacted to Promote the Extinguishment of Unattended Fires,” by Reps. Millie Hamner & Terri Carver and Sens. Don Coram & Michael Merrifield. The bill states that any person who starts or maintains a campfire commits the offense of leaving a campfire unattended if he or she knowingly or recklessly fails to reasonably attend the campfire at all times or fails to thoroughly extinguish the campfire before leaving the site.
  • HB 18-1052 – “Concerning Local Education Providers’ Receipt of Concurrent Enrollment Courses from a Two-year Institution of Higher Education Outside of the Institution’s Approved Service Area when the Institution Approved to Serve the Local Education Provider Declines to Provide Concurrent Enrollment Courses,” by Reps. Paul Lundeen & Jeff Bridges and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill requires the commission to establish a policy that allows a 2-year institution of higher education to provide a concurrent enrollment program or course to a local education provider that is not within its college service area if the designated 2-year institution of higher education chooses not to provide a concurrent enrollment program or course requested by the local education provider.
  • HB 18-1066 – “Concerning Clarifying that the Law Enforcement and Defense Counsel Exemption for Sexual Exploitation of a Child Crime Does Not Change the Discovery Procedures for Sexually Exploitative Material,” by Reps. Yeulin Willett & Mike Foote and Sen. John Cooke. The bill clarifies that the sexual exploitation of a child statute does not change the discovery procedure for sexually exploitative materials and that the defendant and defense counsel personnel are not allowed to receive copies of the materials.
  • HB 18-1073 – “Concerning Water Districts’ Ability to Enter into Contracts Regarding their Water-related Assets,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes water districts, including water activity enterprises, to enter into contracts for water and the capacity in works and allows the contracts to be based on municipalities’ authority to contract for water and sewer facilities.
  • HB 18-1095 – “Concerning Educator Licenses Issued to Military Spouses,” by Reps. Terri Carver & Jeni James Arndt and Sens. Bob Gardner & Nancy Todd. The bill exempts military spouses from a requirement that teaching or special services experience be continuous, and instead requires 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1117 – “Concerning Liens that Attach to Personal Property that is Stored at a Self-service Storage Facility,” by Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & James Coleman and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill modifies the law governing the statutory lien that an owner of a self-storage facility has for the occupant’s late payment of rent or other charges.
  • HB 18-1141 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated References in Statute to ‘Early Childhood Care and Education Councils,'” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes outdated references in statute to “early childhood care and education councils.” The term is no longer used. Instead, these entities are referred to as “early childhood councils.”
  • HB 18-1142 – “Concerning Modernizing Language in Statutory Sections that Refer to Paupers,” by Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Rachel Zenzinger. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections by replacing the terms ‘pauper’ and ‘paupers’ with ‘indigent’ or ‘indigent persons’.
  • HB 18-1183 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Home Food Service Plans Pursuant to the “Sale of Meat Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Department of Regulatory Agencies’ Sunset Review Recommendation to Repeal the Act,” by Reps. Edie Hooten & Kim Ransom and Sen. Randy Baumgartner. The bill implements the recommendation of the Department of Regulatory Agencies, as contained in the Department’s sunset review of home food service plans, by repealing the ‘Sale of Meat Act’, thereby eliminating the regulation of home food service plans by the department of agriculture.
  • HB 18-1210 – “Concerning Peace Officer Status for the Administrator of Judicial Security in the Colorado Judicial Department,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. John Cooke. The bill designates an administrator of judicial security in the Colorado judicial department as a peace officer who must be certified by the peace officer standards and training board.
  • HB 18-1249 – “Concerning the Requirement that the State Treasurer Distribute any Federal Funds Related to the Naval Oil Shale Reserve Land to Specified Counties or their Federal Mineral Lease Districts,” by Reps. Bob Rankin & Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. If the state receives any federal mineral lease revenue from oil and gas production on naval oil shale reserve land that was set aside prior to January 1, 2009, and withheld by the federal government, then instead of depositing the money in the mineral leasing fund the state treasurer is required to distribute the money to certain counties or a related federal mineral lease district.

The bill that the governor sent to the Secretary of State without a signature was HB 18-1086, “Concerning Allowing Community Colleges to Offer a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing,” by Reps. Janet Buckner & Paul Lundeen and Sens. Tim Neville & Irene Aguilar.

For a complete list of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: District Court Erred in Excluding Evidence That has the Necessary Effect of a Dismissal

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in HCG Platinum, LLC v. Prederred Product Placement Co. on Tuesday, October 17, 2017.

HCG Platinum, LLC (HCG) and Preferred Product Placement Corporation (PPPC) entered into a marketing and non-circumvention agreement, where PPPC agreed to place HCG products into specified retailers in exchange for a percentage of the proceeds, PPPC would disclose details of negotiations and projects with other business associates, and HCG would be prevented from interfering with PPPC’s agreements with any third-parties. The following year, HCG filed a breach of contract action against PPPC, alleging that PPPC breached the agreement by failing to execute a sales agreement with certain retailers. PPPC filed a counterclaim alleging that HCG breached the agreement by failing to pay outstanding commissions and by interfering with PPPC’s third-party relationships. The damages PPPC put forth were void of evidential support or significant written explanation.

HCG then moved to preclude PPPC from presenting any evidence of damages under the agreement. HCG argued that PPPC’s initial disclosures described projections that would be inadmissible without expert testimony and PPPC should not be able to put on any evidence of damages.

The district court stated that PPPC’s failure to supplement the damages aspect of its initial disclosures meant that PPPC could not introduce evidence of damages unless its discovery deficiency proved harmless or substantially justified. The district court then described an established “four factor test” regarding: (1) the prejudice or surprise to the party against whom the damages evidence would be offered, which is HCG; (2) HCG’s ability to cure that prejudice; (3) the extent to which the introduction of new damages evidence would disrupt the trial; and (4) whether bad faith or willfulness motivated PPPC’s discovery failures.

The district court addressed the fourth factor and found no support for a finding of bad faith. The district court then focused on prejudice and harmlessness and allowed arguments from both parties for the right way to think about the issue. HCG argued that the law compelled exclusion due to PPPC’s failure to disclose precise quantifications of damages, as well as claiming that the prejudice proved incurable and disruptive because reopening discovery and reviewing new documents would be burdensome and expensive. PPPC emphasized that its conduct caused only slight prejudice, which could be easily remedied through limited additional discovery.

The district court concluded that PPPC could not proceed to trial and entered a judgement in favor of HCG. PPPC appealed. The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals reviewed the district court’s decision.

The Tenth Circuit concluded that the district court abused its discretion by imposing a discovery sanction that barred PPPC from pursing its counterclaims. The court  based this conclusion on the fact that the district court misapplied the four-factor test described above, and found that the record reflected that the district court reached an arbitrary outcome that overlooked all but the last factor of the test.

The Tenth Circuit reversed the district court’s judgment in favor of HCG on PPPC’s counterclaims and remanded to allow the district court to reevaluate the exclusion of PPPC’s damages evidence under the four factor test.

The Tenth Circuit also mentioned that district courts should consider the effectiveness of lesser sanctions, where the exclusion of evidence has the necessary force and effect of a dismissal. There are three reasons for this. First is that dismissal constitutes an extreme sanction that typically is appropriate only in cases of bad faith or willful misconduct. Second, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure expressly empower the district courts to impose sanctions short of exclusion. And third is the notion that district courts should consider the appropriateness of lesser sanctions, where their discovery rulings have the effect of dismissal, which is in accord with the decisions of other circuits.

The Tenth Circuit held that where the exclusion of evidence has the necessary effect of a dismissal, as in this case, the district courts should, in conjunction with the traditional four factor test, consider the efficacy of less drastic alternatives, reserving the sanction of dismissal for cases involving bad faith or willfulness or instances where less severe sanctions would prove futile.

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals REVERSED the district court’s judgment in favor of HCG and REMANDED with instructions that the district court reevaluate the exclusion of PPPC’s damage evidence.

Bills Signed Regarding Appropriating Retail Marijuana Sales Tax to Schools, Clarifying Standard for Deceptive Trade Practices, and More

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the governor signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 55 bills this legislative session. Many of Thursday’s bills involved the relocation of statutes from Title 12. Some of the other bills signed include a bill to clarify which entities are eligible to apply for special event beverage licenses, a bill appropriating retail marijuana sales tax to schools, a bill changing the date of special district elections to May every-other year, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1027 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of the Lottery from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the sections of Title 12 related to the regulation of the lottery to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1028 – “Concerning Clarification of the Standard Required for Applications for a Court Order to Require Compliance with Investigations of Deceptive Trade Practices,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Lois Court & Jack Tate. The bill would allow a judge to issue a court order if compliance with an investigation is necessary to investigate a deceptive trade practice.
  • HB 18-1039 – “Concerning Changing Regular Special District Elections to May of Each Odd-numbered Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Adjusting the Length of Terms Served by Directors Elected in 2020 and 2022 in Order to Implement the New Election Schedule,” by Rep. Kim Ransom and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill moves regular special district elections to the Tuesday following the first Monday of May in odd-numbered years, rather than the Tuesday immediately succeeding the first Monday of May in every even-numbered year, starting in 2023.
  • HB 18-1087 – “Concerning Department of Public Safety Authority to Repeal Rules Relating to Defunct Boards,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sens. Don Coram & Daniel Kagan. The victims compensation and assistance coordinating committee and the victims assistance and law enforcement advisory board in the department of public safety were repealed in 2009. The bill gives the executive director of the department of public safety the authority to repeal rules relating to those repealed boards.
  • HB 18-1096 – “Concerning the Eligibility of Certain Entities to Apply for a Special Event Permit to Sell Alcohol Beverages,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill adds to the list of organizations authorized to obtain a special event permit to sell alcohol beverages for a limited period an organization that is incorporated under Colorado law for educational purposes.
  • HB 18-1100 – “Concerning the Continuous Appropriation of Money in the Educator Licensure Cash Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill extends the continuous appropriation of money to the State Board of Education and the Department of Education (Department) for its expenses incurred in the administration of the “Colorado Educator Licensing Act of 1991” for three more years.
  • HB 18-1101 – “Concerning Modification of the Manner in which Gross Retail Marijuana Tax Revenue that is Transferred from the General Fund to the State Public School Fund as Required by Current Law is Appropriated from the State Public School Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. Beginning in the 2018-19 fiscal year, the bill requires 12.59% of the gross retail marijuana sales tax revenue remaining in the general fund after a required allocation of 10% of the revenue to local governments to be transferred to the state public school fund, and continuously appropriates that revenue for the same state fiscal year in which it is transferred from the state public school fund to the department of education to help meet the state share of total program funding for school districts and institute charter schools.
  • HB 18-1140 – “Concerning Public Official Personal Surety Bonds, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing Obsolete Provisions and Authorizing the Purchase of Insurance in Lieu of Public Official Personal Surety Bonds,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals obsolete provisions related to personal surety bonds and authorizes a public entity to purchase insurance in lieu of a public official personal surety bond and states the requirements for the insurance.
  • SB 18-036 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Tobacco Sales to Minors from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44, then relocates the sections of Title 24 regarding the regulation of tobacco sales to minors to Title 44.
  • SB 18-091 – “Concerning Modernizing Terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes Related to Behavioral Health,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill is a follow-up and clean-up to Senate Bill 17-242, which updated and modernized terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes related to behavioral health, including mental health disorders, alcohol use disorders, and substance use disorders.
  • SB 18-092 – “Concerning Updating Statutory References to ‘County Departments of Social Services,'” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes outdated references in statute to “County Department(s) of Social Services,” or similar terms, to “County Department(s) of Human or Social Services.” Counties throughout the state have different ways of referring to the department in the county that does human or social services work, so it is necessary for statute to reflect that not all county departments go by one label.
  • SB 18-094 – “Concerning the Repeal of a Duplicate Definitions Section in Article 60 of Title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill repeals section 27-60-102.5, Colorado Revised Statutes, which is a duplicate definitions section for general provisions related to behavioral health found in article 60 of title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes. The bill leaves in place section 27-60-100.3, Colorado Revised Statutes, enacted by Senate Bill 17-242.
  • SB 18-100 – “Concerning Disclosure of Additional Mandatory Charges by Motor Vehicle Rental Companies,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill requires a motor vehicle rental company to disclose to a potential customer, in any vehicle rental cost quote and in the rental agreement, additional mandatory charges applicable to the motor vehicle rental.
  • SB 18-103 – “Concerning the Issuance of Performance-based Incentives for Film Production Activities in the State,” by Sens. Nancy Todd & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Timothy Leonard. The bill strengthens the requirements necessary to earn performance-based incentives for film production activities in the state in various ways.
  • SB 18-164 – “Concerning the Repeal of Reporting Requirements for Certain Unfunded Programs in the Department of Human Services Until Such Time as Funding is Received,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill directs that reporting requirements for programs established in the department of human services that have not received funding in several years be placed on hold until such time as the program receives funding.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Noncompetition Clause Unenforceable Against Dissenting Shareholder Doctor

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Crocker v. Greater Colorado Anesthesia, P.C. on Thursday, March 8, 2018.

Shareholder Employment Agreement—Merger—Dissenters’ Rights—Covenant Not to Compete—Judicial AppraisalLiquidated Damages.

Crocker, an anesthesiologist, was a shareholder in Metro Denver Anesthesia from 2001 until 2013, when that entity merged with Greater Colorado Anesthesia, P.C. (old GCA), now known as Greater Colorado Anesthesia, Inc. (new GCA). In conjunction with the merger, Crocker purchased one share of old GCA stock for $100. In April 2013 he signed a shareholder employment agreement (the Agreement), which contained a provision for liquidated damages to be paid to old GCA in the event that the former employee violated the “Damages Upon Competition” section within two years immediately following termination of the Agreement.

In 2014, old GCA began entertaining a merger with U.S. Anesthesia Partners (USAP) under which USAP would buy out GCA shares for a lump sum of cash plus USAP common stock. To receive that payment, shareholders of old GCA would be required to execute a new employment agreement reflecting a 21.3% reduction in pay and a five-year employment commitment. Old GCA would form an interim company (GCA Merger Sub, Inc.), file amended and restated articles of incorporation, and convert the company into a C-corporation, new GCA.

Crocker voted against the action and provided notice under C.R.S. § 7-113-202 that he would demand payment for his share of old GCA if the merger were approved, in exercise of his dissenter’s rights.

The merger was approved in 2015. Each approving shareholder would receive $626,000 in cash; $224,000 in USAP common stock, to fully vest in five years; and a signing/retention bonus. Old GCA sent Crocker $100 for his share. He refused it and later demanded $1,030,996.

Crocker communicated that he did not understand how the merger would affect his employment status and offered to work under a temporary contract, but GCA did not offer one. He did not return to work, but took a temporary position and then signed an employment agreement with Guardian Anesthesia Services and began providing services at a hospital within the noncompete area of the Agreement.

As relevant to this appeal, the district court held a trial to address (1) new CGA’s claim for damages resulting from Crocker’s alleged breach of the Agreement’s noncompete terms, and (2) new CGA’s request for a judicial appraisal of the fair value of Crocker’s 1.1% share of old GCA. The district court found that Crocker was no longer bound by the Agreement and the covenant not to compete could not be enforced against him. It also found that the fair value of Crocker’s share of old GCA was $56,044 plus interest.

On appeal, GCA argued that the district court erred in finding the noncompete provision unenforceable. The court of appeals stated, as a threshold matter, that generally a noncompete provision will survive a merger and the right to enforce the provision will vest in the surviving entity. But the court held that new GCA could not enforce the noncompete provision against Crocker because it is unreasonable to enforce the provision against a dissenting shareholder forced out of employment by the action of a merger. Here, it was undisputed that an anesthesiologist must reside within 30 minutes of where he works, and as a practical matter, enforcing the noncompete provision would have required Crocker to move or to pay GCA damages to continue to practice. Enforcement would thus further penalize Crocker’s exercise of his right to dissent rather than protect him from the conduct of the majority. Under these circumstances, the noncompete is unreasonable and imposes a hardship on Crocker. It is thus not enforceable against him as of the date the merger was finalized.

Further, C.R.S. § 8-2-113(3) directs that a damages term in a noncompete provision such as the one here is enforceable only if the amount is reasonably related to the injury suffered. Under the Agreement’s liquidated damages provision, Crocker would have to pay $207,755 in damages for the alleged violation of the noncompete provision. The district court determined, with record support, that the injury suffered by old GCA because of Crocker’s departure was zero. Here, there was no reasonable relationship between the actual injury suffered and the damages calculated per the formula, and the noncompete was not enforceable against Crocker.

Crocker cross-appealed the district court’s valuation of his share of old GCA, contending that the court erred in valuing his share by excluding evidence of the price USAP paid for old GCA. The district court did not refuse to consider the deal price, but properly rejected it because it found the price to be an unreliable starting point from which to determine fair value.

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Courts May Only Appoint Receivers for Marijuana Businesses who are Licensed Under Marijuana Code

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Marriage of Yates on Thursday, March 8, 2018.

Dissolution of Marriage—Receiver—Colorado Medical Marijuana Code—Retail Marijuana Code.

Petitioner-Appellee Yates filed a petition to dissolve her marriage to respondent-appellee Humphrey. She requested the appointment of a receiver over marital property, which included marijuana businesses. A number of these marijuana businesses were licensed medical and recreational marijuana entities. The court appointed Sterling Consulting Corporation, including its principal Richard Block, as the receiver. When the court entered the receivership order, neither Block nor his employees held the licenses required by the Colorado Medical Marijuana Code and the Colorado Retail Marijuana Code to own, operate, manage, control, or work in a licensed marijuana business.

After learning of the receivership order, the Colorado Department of Revenue, officially acting as the State Licensing Authority (SLA), moved to intervene and modify the receivership order by removing the receiver, at least until Block and his employees obtained the requisite licenses. The court granted the motion to intervene, but denied the motion to modify.

On appeal, SLA challenged the court’s authority to appoint receivers who are not licensed to operate marijuana businesses. A district court may only appoint a receiver for a marijuana business who complies with Colorado’s marijuana licensing laws.

The order appointing the receiver was reversed and the case was remanded with directions.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Governor Signs Bill to Correct Typographical Error

On Monday, March 5, 2018, the governor signed one bill into law. To date, he has signed 30 bills this legislative session. The bill signed Monday, SB 18-105, made a correction to last session’s bill, HB 17-1367. The summary is as follows:

  • SB 18-105 – “Concerning Clarifying Changes to Provisions that were Contained in House Bill 17-1367,” by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Dan Pabon. House Bill 17-1367 required that a state, local, or municipal agency only employ or use the results of marijuana tests if the tests were conducted by an analytical laboratory that was both certified by the state marijuana enforcement division (MED) and accredited pursuant to the International Organization for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission standard (international standard). The requirement that an analytical laboratory be both certified by the MED and accredited pursuant to the international standard was an inadvertent error. The intent was that an analytical laboratory could either be certified by the MED or accredited pursuant to the international standard. The bill changes the ‘and’ to an ‘or’ in order to effectuate the original intent.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Signed Allowing Alcohol to be Auctioned at Special Events, Amending Employer Ability to Access FPPA Plans, and More

On Thursday, March 1, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 26 bills into law. To date, he has signed 29 bills this legislative session. Many of the bills signed Thursday were supplemental appropriations bills or bills moving statutes from Title 12, C.R.S., but among the rest were bills allowing the auctioning of alcohol in sealed containers at special events, amending an employer’s ability to access Fire and Police Pension Association plans, and adopting the Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact. Summaries of the bills signed Thursday are available here.

  • HB 18-1022 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Department of Revenue Issue a Request for Information for an Electronic Sales and Use Tax Simplification System,” by Reps. Lang Sias & Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Tim Neville. The bill requires the department of revenue to issue a request for information for an electronic sales and use tax simplification system that the state or any local government that levies a sales or use tax, including a home rule municipality and county, could choose to use that would provide administrative simplification to the state and local sales and use tax system.
  • HB 18-1031 – “Concerning Employer Entry into the Fire and Police Pension Association Defined Benefit System,” by Reps. Jovan Melton & Kim Ransom and Sens. John Cooke & Matt Jones. The bill allows an employer that provides a money purchase plan to apply to the board, with a single application, to cover some or all of the existing members of its money purchase plan in the defined benefit system. Current law requires the employer to apply to the board separately for each plan.
  • HB 18-1075 – “Concerning the Enactment of Colorado Revised Statutes 2017 as the Positive and Statutory Law of the State of Colorado,” by Reps. Pete Lee & Leslie Herod and Sens. Daniel Kagan & John Cooke. This bill enacts the softbound volumes of Colorado Revised Statutes 2017, including the corrected replacement volume consisting of titles 42 and 43, as the positive and statutory law of the state of Colorado and establishes the effective date of said publication.
  • HB 18-1079 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Works Allocation Committee Prepare Annual Recommendations for the Use of the Colorado Long-term Works Reserve,” by Rep. Susan Beckman and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires the works allocation committee to annually submit to the executive director of the Department of Human Services, the governor, and the joint budget committee recommendations for the use of the money in the Colorado long-term works reserve for the upcoming state fiscal year.
  • HB 18-1144 – “Concerning Certain Publishing Requirements for the Department of Revenue’s ‘Disclosure of Average Taxes Paid’ Table,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill updates language regarding mailing of tax tables, and refers in general to the department’s website and also requires the department to provide the table on the software platform that the department makes available to taxpayers to file individual income taxes rather than refer to the “NetFile” link.
  • HB 18-1159 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Education,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Education.
  • HB 18-1160 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Offices of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, and State Planning and Budgeting,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the offices of the governor, lieutenant governor, and state planning and budgeting.
  • HB 18-1161 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing.
  • HB 18-1162 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Human Services,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Human Services.
  • HB 18-1163 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Judicial Department,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Judicial Department.
  • HB 18-1164 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Personnel,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Personnel.
  • HB 18-1165 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1166 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Regulatory Agencies.
  • HB 18-1167 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Revenue,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Revenue.
  • HB 18-1168 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of State,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of State.
  • HB 18-1169 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of the Treasury,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of the Treasury.
  • HB 18-1170 – “Concerning Funding for Capital Construction, and Making Supplemental Appropriations in Connection Therewith,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes supplemental appropriations for capital construction projects.
  • HB 18-1173 – “Concerning a Supplemental Transfer of Money from the General Fund to the Information Technology Capital Account of the Capital Construction Fund for the 2017-18 State Fiscal Year,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kent Lambert. For the 2017-18 fiscal year, the bill transfers $2,888,529 from the general fund to the information technology capital account of the capital construction fund.
  • SB 18-019 – “Concerning an Expansion of the Duration for which the Colorado Water Resources and Power Development Authority may Make a Loan Under the Authority’s Revolving Loan Programs,” by Sens. Kerry Donovan & Don Coram and Reps. Chris Hansen & Jeni James Arndt. Current law limits the duration of any water pollution control loan to 20 years; this bill removes the 20-year limitation.
  • SB 18-027 – “Concerning the Enactment of the ‘Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact’, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Hugh McKean. The bill repeals the current ‘Nurse Licensure Compact’ and adopts the ‘Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact’.
  • SB 18-030 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Self-Propelled Vehicles from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Daniel Kagan and Reps. Mike Foote & Yeulin Willett. The bill creates Title 44 in the Colorado Revised Statutes and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-032 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & John Cooke and Reps. Mike Foote & Leslie Herod. The bill relocates articles 26 and 26.1 from Title 12 to a new part in Title 18, and relocates the Uniform Unsworn Declarations Act to a new article in Title 13.
  • SB 18-034 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Gaming from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. John Cooke & Lucia Guzman and Reps. Cole Wist & Pete Lee. The bill creates a new Title 44 and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-035 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Gambling Payment Intercept from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & John Cooke and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44 of the Colorado Revised Statutes and relocates certain statutory sections to Title 44.
  • SB 18-041 – “Concerning the Ability of Operators of Sand and Gravel Mines to Use Water Incidental to Sand and Gravel Mining Operations to Mitigate the Impacts of Mining,” by Sens. Don Coram & Randy Baumgartner and Reps. Lori Saine & Jeni James Arndt. The bill specifies that the groundwater replacement plan or the plan of substitute supply and the permit may authorize uses of water incidental to open mining for sand and gravel, including specifically the mitigation of impacts from mining and dewatering.
  • SB 18-054 – “Concerning a Limitation on the Amount of an Increase in Fees Assessed Against Assisted Living Residences by the Department of Public Health and Environment,” by Sen. Larry Crowder and Rep. Larry Liston. Current law requires the State Board of Health to establish a schedule of fees for health facilities, including assisted living facilities. The bill applies an inflation rate limitation to the fees for assisted living facilities.
  • SB 18-067 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Organizations Conducting a Special Event to Auction Alcohol Beverages in Sealed Containers for Fundraising Purposes under Specified Circumstances,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Kevin Priola and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill specifically allows certain organizations to bring onto and remove from the premises where an event will be held, whether licensed or unlicensed, alcohol beverages in sealed containers that were donated to or otherwise lawfully obtained by the organization and will be used for an auction for fundraising purposes as long as the alcohol beverages remain in sealed containers at all times and the licensee does not realize any financial gain related to the alcohol beverage auction.

For a list of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Body-Worn Cameras Are Not “Personal Safety and Health Equipment” and Therefore Do Not Mandate Collective Bargaining

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Denver Police Protective Association v. City & County of Denver on Thursday, February 22, 2018.

Labor Relations—Collective Bargaining—Body-Worn Cameras—Summary Judgment.

The City and County of Denver (Denver) and the Denver Police Protective Association (DPPA) are parties to a collective bargaining agreement. That agreement implements the City and County of Denver Charter (Charter), which sets forth Denver’s obligations regarding collective bargaining with certain of its employees. A category in the Charter that is not required to be subject to collective bargaining is officer health and safety matters, except for personal safety and health equipment.

In 2015, the Denver Police Department (DPD) promulgated, without bargaining or consultation with DPPA, a policy regarding the use of body-worn cameras (BWCs). The policy required “patrol officers and corporals assigned to all six police Districts, the Gang Unit and Traffic Operations” to wear and use BWCs. DPPA immediately contended that this was a mandatory subject of collective bargaining and demanded that Denver bargain. Denver refused.

DPPA sued, alleging Denver violated the collective bargaining agreement by implementing the BWC policy without first bargaining in good faith with DPPA. The parties filed cross-motions for summary judgment. The district court granted summary judgment in favor of DPPA and ordered Denver to bargain over the implementation of the BWC policy.

On appeal, the court of appeals considered whether the BWCs are “personal safety and health equipment” subject to collective bargaining as claimed by DPPA and agreed to by the district court, or if they are equipment that relates to “officer safety and health matters,” as Denver argued, and therefore are not a mandatory subject of collective bargaining.

Analyzing the Charter, the court concluded that it is reasonable to restrict the definition of “personal safety and health equipment” to equipment whose principal purpose is the safety of officers. The case thus turned on whether the principal purpose of BWCs is officer safety. While BWCs may incidentally impact officer safety, their principal purpose is not to increase the safety of the officer. The court therefore concluded that BWCs are not “personal health and safety equipment” under the Charter and are not a mandatory subject of collective bargaining.

The judgment was reversed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.