April 20, 2018

Bills Signed Regarding Fiduciary Duties of Title Insurance Entities, Public Official Oaths and Affirmations, and More

On Thursday, March 29, 2018, the governor signed 17 bills into law. He also signed 16 bills into law on Monday, April 2, 2018. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 114 bills this legislative session and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday and Monday include a bill concerning the fiduciary duties of title insurance entities with regard to funds held for closing, a bill exempting physicians who treat patients with rare disorders from non-compete agreements, several bills updating outdated statutory language, bills regarding financing broadband for rural areas, a bill requiring reporting when title to a motor vehicle has been transferred, and more. The bills signed Thursday and Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1012 – “Concerning Vision Care Plans for Eye Care Services,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Susan Lontine and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Irene Aguilar. The bill prohibits a carrier or entity that offers a vision care plan from requiring an eye care provider with whom the carrier or entity contracts to provide services at a set fee, charge a person for noncovered services, or participate in a carrier’s other vision plan networks.
  • HB 18-1091 – “Concerning Dementia Diseases, and, in Connection Therewith, Updating Statutory References to Dementia Diseases and Related Disabilities,” by Reps. Susan Beckman & Joann Ginal and Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd. The bill updates statutory references to Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases and reflects that dementia diseases have related disabilities impacting memory and other cognitive abilities.
  • HB 18-1099 – “Concerning Criteria that the Broadband Deployment Board is Required to Develop with Regard to an Incumbent Telecommunications Provider’s Exercise of a Right to Implement a Broadband Deployment Project in an Unserved Area of the State Upon a Nonincumbent Provider’s Application to the Broadband Deployment Board to Implement a Proposed Broadband Deployment Project in the Unserved Area,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires that the Broadband Deployment Board’s criteria include requirements that an incumbent telecommunications provider exercising its right to implement a broadband deployment project for the unserved area agree to provide demonstrated downstream and upstream speeds equal to or faster than the speeds indicated in the applicant’s proposed project and at a cost per household that is equal to or less than the cost per household indicated in the applicant’s proposed project.
  • HB 18-1103 – “Concerning the Ability of a Local Government to Require a Driver to Meet Safety Standards for the Use of an Off-highway Vehicle,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill clarifies that a local government does not violate state rules if it imposes certain requirements on a driver of an off-highway vehicle.
  • HB 18-1130 – “Concerning Increasing the Availability of Qualified Personnel who are Licensed in Another State to Teach in Public Schools,” by Reps. Dave Williams & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill changes requirements for special education teacher requirements from 3 years of continuous experience to 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1137 – “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports to the General Assembly, and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Requirements for Reports by the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill continues reporting requirements of the Departments of Transportation and Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1138 – “Concerning Standardizing Public Official Oaths of Office, and, in Connection Therewith, Providing a Uniform Oath Text and Establishing Requirements for Taking, Subscribing, Administering, and Filing Public Oaths of Office,” by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill establishes a single uniform text for swearing or affirming an oath of office and the requirements regarding how and when an oath or affirmation of office must be taken, subscribed, administered, and filed.
  • HB 18-1139 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated Statutory References to Repealed Reporting Requirements that were Previously Imposed on the Parks and Wildlife Commission with Regard to its Rule-making Authority to Set Fees,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes obsolete references to a statutory subsection that was repealed on September 1, 2017.
  • HB 18-1158 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Corrections.
  • HB 18-1171 – “Concerning Adjustments in the Amount of Total Program Funding for Public Cchools for the 2017-18 Budget Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill adjusts the minimum amount of total program funding specified in statute to reflect this intent for the actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count.
  • HB 18-1196 – “Concerning Authorization to Verify the Disability of an Applicant to the Aid to the Needy Disabled Program,” by Rep. Tony Exum and Sens. Nancy Todd & Beth Martinez Humenik. Under current law, in order to receive assistance under the aid to the needy disabled program, an applicant must be examined by a physician, physician assistant, advanced practice nurse, or registered nurse. The bill adds to the list of persons authorized to perform an examination a licensed psychologist, or any other licensed or certified health care personnel the department of human services deems appropriate.
  • HB 18-1233 – “Concerning a Consumer Reporting Agency’s Placement of a Security Freeze on the Consumer Report of a Consumer who is Under the Charge of a Representative at the Request of the Consumer’s Representative,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes a parent or legal guardian (representative) to request that a consumer reporting agency place a security freeze on the consumer report of either a minor less than 16 years of age or another individual who is a ward of the representative (protected consumer).
  • SB 18-002 – “Concerning the Financing of Broadband Deployment,” by Sens. Don Coram & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. KC Becker & Crisanta Duran. The bill amends the definition of ‘broadband network’ to increase the speed of downstream broadband internet service from at least 4 megabits per second to at least 10 megabits per second and the definition of ‘unserved area’ to refer to an area that is unincorporated, or within a city with a population of fewer than 7,500 inhabitants, and that is not receiving federal support to construct a broadband network to serve a majority of the households in each census block in the area, and requires the PUC to allocate money.
  • SB 18-028 – “Concerning the Repeal of Certain Requirements for Where a License Plate is Mounted on a Motor Vehicle,” by Sen. Ray Scott and Rep. Jeff Bridges. Current law requires each license plate to be at the approximate center of a motor vehicle and at least 12 inches from the ground. The bill repeals this requirement for the front license plate and replaces it with a requirement that the front license plate be mounted horizontally on the front in the location designated by the manufacturer.
  • SB 18-073 – “Concerning Reporting to the Department of Revenue when Ownership of a Motor Vehicle has been Transferred,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. Kim Ransom & Leslie Herod. The bill creates a voluntary program administered by the Department of Revenue that authorizes the owner of a motor vehicle to report a transfer of ownership of the motor vehicle. If the previous owner reports the transfer to the Department, the previous owner is not subject to liability for the misuse of the vehicle.
  • SB 18-074 – “Concerning Adding Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome to the List of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,” by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Chris Hansen. The bill adds Prader-Willi syndrome to the list of persons who have mandatory eligibility for services and supports and also to the definition of an ‘intellectual and developmental disability’ for the purpose of receiving services and supports.
  • SB 18-082 – “Concerning a Physician’s Right to Provide Continuing Care to Patients with Rare Disorders Despite a Covenant Not to Compete,” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Sen. Chris Kennedy. The bill exempts physicians who provide care to patients with rare diseases from non-compete agreements.
  • SB 18-090 – “Concerning ‘Rights of Married Women,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections concerning the “rights of married women” to be inclusive of married men and women.
  • SB 18-095 – “Concerning the Removal of Statutory References to the Marital Status of Parents of a Child,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Edie Hooten & Hugh McKean. The bill removes or modernizes outdated statutory references to a ‘legitimate’ or ‘illegitimate’ child and a ‘child born out of wedlock’. Colorado only recognizes parentage of a child and acknowledges that the parent and child relationship extends equally to every child and every parent, regardless of the marital status of the parents.
  • SB 18-098 – “Concerning Amending a Statutory Provision Relating to Interest on Damages that was Ruled Unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill amends C.R.S. § 13-21-101 (1), concerning interest on damages, to reflect a 1996 decision made by the Colorado Supreme Court that ruled certain language in that subsection violated the equal protection clause of the constitution.
  • SB 18-099 – “Concerning the Alignment of Early Childhood Quality Improvement Programs with the Colorado Shines Quality Rating and Improvement System,” by Sens. Michael Merrifield & Kevin Priola and Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson. The bill amends the application and eligibility requirements for the school-readiness quality improvement program and the infant and toddler quality and availability grant program to align with the Colorado shines quality rating and improvement system to streamline the administration of the programs.
  • SB 18-102 – “Concerning the Requirement for an Odometer Reading when a Motor Vehicle’s Identification Number is Physically Verified,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the requirement that the odometer be read when a motor vehicle’s identification number is physically verified.
  • SB 18-104 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Broadband Deployment Board File a Petition with the Federal Communications Commission to Seek a Waiver from the Commission’s Rules Prohibiting a State Entity from Applying for Certain Federal Money Earmarked for Financing Broadband Deployment in Remote Areas of the Nation,” by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Barbara McLaughlin. The bill requires the broadband deployment board, on or before January 1, 2019, to petition the federal communications commission (FCC) for a waiver from the FCC’s rules prohibiting a state entity from applying for federal money earmarked for broadband deployment in remote areas of the nation through the remote areas fund created as part of the connect America fund established by the FCC.
  • SB 18-111 – “Concerning the Removal of an Obsolete Date in the Law that Designates State Legal Holidays,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law specifies that if executive branch employees who are in the state personnel system are required to work on a state legal holiday, the employees shall receive an alternate day off or be paid in accordance with the state personnel system or state fiscal rules in effect on April 30, 1979. The state fiscal rules in effect in 1979 have been amended numerous times since that time and are no longer applicable or relevant. The bill removes the reference to April 30, 1979.
  • SB 18-121 – “Concerning Certain Expenses Allowed to a State Employee when the Employee is Required to Change his or her Place of Residence in Connection with a Change in Job Duties,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law allows an employee in the state personnel system his or her moving and relocation expenses if an appointing authority requires the employee to change his or her place of residence due to a change in job duties. The bill specifies that moving expenses, including the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects and the reasonable costs of traveling to a new residence, are reimbursable in accordance with rules promulgated by the state controller and in compliance with the regulations of the federal internal revenue service.
  • SB 18-125 – “Concerning Fiduciary Responsibilities of Title Insurance Entities to Protect Funds held in Conjunction with Real Estate Closing Settlement Services,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Daniel Kagan and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill requires title insurance entities and affiliates or subsidiaries to hold funds belonging to others in a fiduciary capacity. ‘Fiduciary funds’ means all funds received in conjunction with real estate closing and settlement services.
  • SB 18-131 – “Concerning Modifications to the “State Employees Group Benefits Act,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modifies several provisions of the State Employees Group Benefits Act to bring it into compliance with current state and federal law and to eliminate obsolete provisions.
  • SB 18-134 – “Concerning the Exemption of Nonprofit Water Companies from Regulation by the Public Utilities Commission,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Under current law, the public utilities commission is directed to grant simplified regulatory treatment to water companies that serve fewer than 1,500 customers. The bill expands on this concept by deregulating water companies that are registered as nonprofits, so long as their rates, charges, and terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable.
  • SB 18-135 – “Concerning Updates to the Colorado Code of Military Justice,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Terri Carver & Pete Lee. The bill updates several parts of the Colorado Code of Military Justice.
  • SB 18-138 – “Concerning Authorization for Retail Sellers of Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption to Sell Remaining Inventory to Another On-premises Retail Seller of Alcohol Beverages with whom there is Common Ownership when No Longer Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Andy Kerr and Reps. Matt Gray & Larry Liston. The bill allows persons with certain retail licenses to purchase alcohol beverages from another retail licensee when there is common ownership between the licensees and the seller has surrendered its license within the last 60 days.
  • SB 18-160 – “Concerning the Authority to Operate Certain Teacher Development Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing Alternative Licensure Programs and Induction Programs,” by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. Under existing law, school districts are permitted to operate induction programs for teachers, special services providers, principals, and administrators, and alternative licensure programs for teachers and principals, who do not hold professional licenses. The bill clarifies that charter schools and the state charter school institute may operate such programs.
  • SB 18-165 – “Concerning Requirements for Public Administrators,” by Sens. Tim Neville & Nancy Todd and Reps. Faith Winter & Lori Saine. The bill The bill increases the amount of bond public administrators are required to maintain to $100,000 and clarifies additional requirements.
  • SB 18-173 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Establishments Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption that Serve Food to Allow a Customer to Remove One Opened Container of Partially Consumed Vinous Liquor from the Licensed Premises,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Leslie Herod. Currently, certain liquor licensees may sell one opened container of partially consumed vinous liquor to a customer if the licensee has meals available for consumption on the licensed premises. The bill expands the requirement to include licensees that makes sandwiches and light snacks available for consumption on the premises.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Governor Signs Bill to Modernize “Mental Retardation” Terminology

Photo courtesy of DJ Shoaf, posted on the Next with Kyle Clark Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/Nexton9NEWS/).

On Wednesday, March 21, 2018, the governor signed into law SB 18-096, “Concerning Modernizing Statutory Provisions that Refer to Terms Related to “Mental Retardation,” sponsored by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The governor signed the bill on World Down Syndrome Day, a day on which people around the world people with Down syndrome and those who live and work with them organize and participate in activities and events to raise public awareness and create a single global voice for advocating for the rights, inclusion and well being of people with Down syndrome.

SB 18-096 is a Statutory Revisions Committee bill that modernizes and makes nonsubstantive changes to provisions of statute that use terms like ‘mental retardation’ or ‘mentally retarded’ by replacing the terms with more appropriate ‘intellectual and developmental disability’ language.

For a list of all of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

Colorado Gives: Disability Law Colorado Recognizes the Inherent Value of All People and Embraces Empowerment

Colorado Gives: CBA CLE Legal Connection will be focusing on several Colorado legal charities this week in honor of Colorado Gives Day— Tuesday, December 5, 2017. These charities, and many, many others, greatly appreciate your donations of time and money.

Disability Law Colorado (formerly known as The Legal Center for People with Disabilities and Older People) was created in 1976 out of the dream of a small group of parents who came together to secure equal rights for their children with developmental disabilities who were living in state institutions. These parents wanted a better life for their children and believed that all people with disabilities deserved the right to live full and rewarding lives. Disability Law Colorado’s early successes included requiring school districts to pay for children’s education in public schools, allowing children with severe disabilities to attend school for the first time. Disability Law Colorado also succeeded in preventing sterilization of people with developmental disabilities and preventing workplace discrimination against people with disabilities.

In 1977, the governor designated Disability Law Colorado to be Colorado’s Protection and Advocacy (P&A) System for people with developmental disabilities. Today, Disability Law Colorado is recognized as a leader in the National Disability Rights Network made up of Protection and Advocacy programs from all the states and territories.

For Colorado Gives Day, Disability Law Colorado has a $15,000 fundraising goal. By donating through Colorado Gives, your gift will go further thanks to a $1 million dollar incentive fund. Click here to donate.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Clerk Should Have Omitted Mental Health Respondent’s Name from Filing System

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of T.T. on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

Index of Cases—Involuntary Mental Health Treatment—C.R.S. § 27-65-107(7).

T.T. accepted voluntary mental health treatment, but the physician did not believe T.T. would remain in a voluntary program and filed a certification for short-term treatment pursuant to C.R.S. § 27-65-107. The district court issued a notice of certification for short-term treatment. Six days later the physician filed a notice of termination of involuntary treatment.

Two years later T.T. learned that his name still appeared on the court’s index of cases. The clerk refused T.T.’s request to remove his name. T.T. filed a pro se motion requesting that his name be omitted from the court’s index in accordance with C.R.S. § 27-65-107(7). The district court denied the motion without making any factual findings or legal conclusions.

A division of the court of appeals issued an order remanding the case for the district court to hold a hearing and make findings of fact and conclusions of law. The district court granted in part T.T.’s motion to omit his name from the index by directing the Arapahoe County Clerk to omit his name from “any list generated or produced, even for the purpose of storage.” The court also denied in part, stating that T.T’s name will “remain in the [Eclipse] database for the purposes of the Clerk of Court’s maintenance of records and to comply with Section 27-65-107(7).”

On appeal, T.T. argued that the district court erred in denying his motion because based on the plain language of the statute and the stipulated facts, his name should also have been omitted from the Eclipse system when he was released from treatment. The public’s right to access to official records is not absolute. Court records for mental health cases, including indices, are not open to public access. The plain language of C.R.S. § 27-65-107(7) requires the clerk to omit a respondent’s name from the index of cases after the clerk is notified of a respondent’s release from involuntary treatment. Finding the phrase “omit the name of the respondent from the index of cases in such court” to be ambiguous, the court of appeals liberally construed this language in light of the General Assembly’s stated objective to “provide the fullest possible measure of privacy, dignity, and other rights to persons undergoing care and treatment for a mental health disorder.” The court concluded that the index of cases in this instance referred to the Eclipse system.

The order was reversed and the case was remanded for the district court to order T.T’s name be omitted from the Eclipse system and lists generated from that system.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: “Legal Disability” Means Inability to Bring Lawsuit Due to Some Policy of Law

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in T.D. v. Wiseman on Thursday, August 10, 2017.

“Legal Disability” for Tolling Statute of Limitations—C.R.S. § 13-80-103.7(3.5)(a).

T.D.’s complaint alleged she had endured 10 years of sexual and physical abuse from defendant, her former stepfather. She alleged that she was 7 years old when the abuse began and that it continued until about 1990, when she was in high school. She alleged that the abuse caused her to become dependent on drugs and alcohol, and she suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, psychological disorders, self-mutilation, eating disorders, depression, and a cycle of abusive relationships.

In August 2005, T.D. disclosed defendant’s alleged abuse to the doctors who had been treating her. She attempted suicide in 2012. Thereafter she was able to maintain sobriety. T.D. filed a lawsuit in 2015 asserting assault, battery, sexual assault and battery, extreme and outrageous conduct, and false imprisonment. Defendant filed a motion for summary judgment, asserting that T.D.’s claims had accrued in 2005 when she disclosed the alleged abuse to her doctors. Consequently, her claims were time-barred by the six-year statute of limitations in C.R.S. § 13-80-103.7(1). T.D. argued that the record contained genuine issues of material fact concerning whether she had been a “person under disability” until 2012 because of her addictions and psychiatric disorder, so the statute would have been tolled until her disability was lifted. The trial court granted the motion for summary judgment, finding no genuine issues of material fact in the record about when her claims accrued or whether the statute of limitations barred those claims.

The court of appeals determined that the issue of when the claim accrued was not properly before it, and assumed it accrued at the latest in 2005. The court then considered whether there was a factual dispute about whether the applicable statute of limitations was tolled because T.D. was a “person under disability.” Under C.R.S. 13-80-103.75(3.5)(a), a “person under disability” is a person who is (1) a minor under 18 (2) “declared mentally incompetent”; (3) “under other legal disability and who does not have a legal guardian”; or (4) “in a special relationship with the perpetrator of the assault” and “psychologically or emotionally unable to acknowledge the assault or offense and the resulting harm.” T.D. was 43 when the trial court granted the summary judgment motion, so she was not a minor from 2005 to 2011, when the statute of limitations was running. The record did not contain disputed facts about whether she was mentally incompetent during the years during which the statute of limitations ran. The court concluded that “legal disability” denotes an inability to bring a lawsuit based on a “policy of the law.” No facts in the record indicated that T.D. lacked the power to timely bring her suit. Lastly, while a familial relationship can constitute a “special relationship,” T.D. did not demonstrate that she was “psychologically or emotionally unable to acknowledge the assault or offense and the resulting harm.”

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Appeals Council Required Only to “Consider” New Evidence of Disability

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Vallejo v. Berryhill on February 28, 2017.

Vallejo applied for supplemental security income benefits alleging that she had been disabled for several months. The US Social Security Administration denied her claim. She received a hearing with an administrative law judge (ALJ), who issued a decision adverse to Vallejo. The next day, Vallejo’s treating physician, Dr. Ratner, completed his opinion, which stated that Vallejo was bipolar with an extreme level of impairment. Vallejo requested the Appeals Council to review the ALJ’s decision and submitted Ratner’s opinion with her request. The Appeals Council denied review, stating that it considered Ratner’s opinion and additional evidence but found the evidence did not provide a basis for changing the ALJ’s decision. This rendered the ALJ’s decision the Commissioner’s final decision.

Vallejo sought judicial review of the Commission’s final decision. The district court found that the Appeals Council erred in not properly articulating its assessment of Ratner’s opinion in denying Vallejo’s request for review. The court reasoned that the Appeals Council was required to either assign Ratner’s opinion controlling weight or articulate reasons for assigning it a lesser weight. Because neither the ALJ nor the Appeals Council expressly evaluated Ratner’s opinion, the district court reversed the Commissioner’s decision and remanded to the Appeals Council to either determine what weight to give Ratner’s opinion or to remand to an ALJ with directions to make such a determination.

The Tenth Circuit held that it had jurisdiction to hear this appeal because the district court’s remand was a sentence-four remand. The Tenth Circuit held this because the district court did not retain jurisdiction and the remand was not solely for consideration of new evidence that was not before the Commissioner.

The Tenth Circuit addressed the issue of whether the district court’s determination that the Appeals Council failed to apply the correct legal standard was an error.

The Tenth Circuit held that the Appeals Circuit was not required to expressly analyze the new evidence of Ratner’s opinion. Rather, the statutes or regulations only require the Appeals Council to “consider” the new evidence. The Tenth Circuit acknowledges that an express analysis from the Appeals Council would be helpful to judicial review. But, further states that nothing in the statutes or regulations requires the Appeals Council to provide that analysis.

Therefore, the Tenth Circuit reversed the district court’s order reversing the Commissioner’s final decision and remanding to the Appeals Council. The Tenth Circuit remanded to the district court with directions to address Vallejo’s remaining arguments and determine if the Commissioner applied the correct legal standards and if substantial evidence in the administrative record supported the Commissioner’s final decision.

Tenth Circuit: Case Law Does Not Support EEOC’s Request for Broad Subpoena

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. TriCore Reference Laboratories on February 27, 2017.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is empowered to investigate charges of discrimination and enforce both Title VII, which prohibits employers from discriminating based on sex, including pregnancy, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) which prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of their disability and requires employers to make “reasonable accommodations” to qualified individuals. When investigating charges of discrimination, the EEOC may obtain evidence that relates to unlawful employment practices covered by Title VII and is relevant to the charge under investigation. If the employer refuses to comply, the EEOC may issue a subpoena compelling production. If the employer does not respond to the subpoena, the EEOC may apply to a federal district court for an order compelling the employer to comply.

Kellie Guadiana worked for TriCore Reference Laboratories as a phlebotomist, which is someone who draws blood. She requested accommodations due to her rheumatoid arthritis, which was exacerbated by her pregnancy. TriCore’s human resource department determined Ms. Guadiana could not perform the essential functions of her position safely. The HR department offered her the opportunity to apply to other positions within the company. When Ms. Guadiana did not apply to a new position, TriCore terminated her.

Ms. Guadiana filed a charge of discrimination with the EEOC alleging that TriCore discriminated against her due to her disability (rheumatoid arthritis) and sex (pregnancy). TriCore explained to the EEOC that it had provided reasonable accommodations by offering her the chance to apply to a new position within the company. EEOC explained that this was a violation of the ADA because the ADA required TriCore to reassign Ms. Guadiana rather than merely provide her with the opportunity to apply to a new position. TriCore statement led the EEOC to suspect that TriCore had a company policy or practice of refusing to provide reassignment as a reasonable accommodation. Due to this, the EEOC informed TriCore in a letter that it was expanding the scope of its investigation to include the failure to accommodate persons with disabilities and failure to accommodate women with disabilities due to pregnancy.

The EEOC sent TriCore another letter requesting a complete list of TriCore employees who had requested an accommodation for disability and a complete list of TriCore employees who had been pregnant while at TriCore and whether they sought or were granted accommodations. TriCore refused to comply. The EEOC subpoenaed the information. When TriCore refused to comply, the EEOC submitted an application to the US District Court for the District of New Mexico requesting an order to show cause why the subpoena should not be enforced. The district court denied the EEOC’s application noting that the EEOC’s real intent in requesting the information was difficult to pin down.

The issue on appeal was whether the district court erred in declining to enforce the EEOC’s subpoena. The Tenth Circuit reviewed the district court’s decision for abuse of discretion. The Tenth Circuit held that the district court did not abuse its discretion in denying the enforcement of either the disability request, which the EEOC asserted was relevant to its investigation into whether TriCore had a policy of discrimination (i.e., pattern-or-practice evidence), or the pregnancy request, which EEOC asserted was relevant to the investigation whether TriCore treated Ms. Guadiana less favorably than similarly situated employees (i.e., comparator evidence).

Under U.S.C. §2000e, the EEOC is empowered to investigate charges of discrimination. But the EEOC has the burden to demonstrate the relevancy of the information sought in a subpoena. The Tenth Circuit referenced the Supreme Court’s decision in University of Pennsylvania v. EEOC, when stating the law that the EEOC does not need to provide a “specific reason” for requesting the information. However, the Tenth Circuit further cites that case for the law that the EEOC still bears the burden of showing the relevancy of the subpoenaed information. To do so, the Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC must show that it has a realistic expectation that the information requested would advance the investigation. The EEOC must also establish a link between the EEOC’s investigatory power and the charges of discrimination.

The Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC’s intent was difficult to pin down. With regard to the pattern-or-practice evidence, the Tenth Circuit held that the district court did not abuse its discretion in denying the EEOC’s request. The Tenth Circuit held that TriCore’s admission that it did not reassign Ms. Guadiana did not justify the EEOC’s expanded investigation beyond its initial investigation into Ms. Guadiana’s individual case. The Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC’s letter informing TriCore of its expanded investigation did not constitute a “charge” of discrimination, which is required under §2000e-8 for the EEOC to seek information about alleged discrimination. The EEOC had not alleged anything suggesting a pattern or practice of discrimination by TriCore. Therefore, the Tenth Circuit held that the district court did not abuse its discretion in finding TriCore’s alleged violation of the ADA, without more, was insufficient to warrant the EEOC’s expanded investigation. The EEOC did not satisfy its burden to justify its expanded investigation.

Next, the Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC waived the disability request part of its comparator-evidence argument on appeal. This was due to the fact that the EEOC limited its comparator-evidence argument on appeal to the pregnancy request. Therefore, the Tenth Circuit considered only the pregnancy request.

The Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC’s pregnancy request could seek information that was potentially relevant to Ms. Guadiana’s charge, which could tend to prove she was denied an accommodation on the basis of her disability. However, the EEOC did not present those relevance arguments in district court. Therefore, the Tenth Circuit held that the EEOC failed to meet its burden of explaining how the pregnancy request would offer information relevant to Ms. Guadiana’s charge. The Tenth Circuit held that the district court did not abuse its discretion.

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s holding.

Bills Signed Adding Water Right for Industrial Hemp, Amending Collections of Delinquent Taxes on Mobile Homes, Changing Election Laws, and More Signed

Though the legislative session is over, the governor continues to sign bills. He signed two bills on Friday, May 19; three bills on Saturday, May 20; three bills on Sunday, May 21; six bills on Monday, May 22; six bills on Tuesday, May 23; four bills on Wednesday, May 24; 28 bills on Thursday, May 25; one bill on Friday, May 26; and one bill on Tuesday, May 30. To date, the governor has signed 285 bills and vetoed one bill this legislative session. The bills signed since May 19 are summarized here.

Friday, May 19, 2017

  • HB 17-1354“Concerning the Collection of Delinquent Taxes on Certain Mobile Homes,” by Rep. KC Becker and Sens. John Kefalas & Kevin Priola. The bill modifies the county treasurer’s duties in connection with the collection of delinquent taxes on mobile or manufactured homes that are not affixed to the ground.
  • SB 17-305“Concerning Modifications to Select Statutory Provisions Affecting Primary Elections Enacted by Voters at the 2016 Statewide General Election to Facilitate the Effective Implementation of the State’s Election Laws, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Kevin Lundberg and Reps. Patrick Neville & Mike Foote.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

  • HB 17-1113“Concerning Electronic Participation in Committee Meetings During the Legislative Interim,” by Reps. Yeulin Willett & Jeni Arndt and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill gives the executive committee of the legislative council the ability to consider, recommend, and establish policies regarding electronic participation by senators or representatives in committee meetings during the legislative interim.
  • HB 17-1258“Concerning Renaming Delta-Montrose Technical College to Technical College of the Rockies,” by Reps. Millie Hamner & Yeulin Willett and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Don Coram. The bill changes the name of ‘Delta-Montrose Technical College’ to ‘Technical College of the Rockies’.
  • SB 17-280“Concerning Extending the Repeal Date of the Colorado Economic Development Commission, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Reps. Dan Thurlow & Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill extends the Colorado economic development commission by changing the repeal date of its organic statute to July 1, 2025.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

  • HB 17-1003“Concerning a Strategic Action Plan to Address Teacher Shortages in Colorado,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires the Department of Higher Education in partnership with the Department of Education to examine recruitment, preparation, and retention of teachers and to prepare a strategic plan to address teacher shortages in school districts and public schools within the state.
  • HB 17-1077“Concerning the Useful Public Service Cash Fund,” by Rep. Donald Valdez and Sen. Don Coram. The bill creates the useful public service cash fund in the judicial branch to facilitate the administration of programs that supervise the performance of useful public service by persons who are required to perform such service pursuant to a criminal sentence.
  • SB 17-117“Concerning Confirmation that Industrial Hemp is a Recognized Agricultural Product for Which a Person with a Water Right Decreed for Agricultural Use may Use the Water Subject to the Water Right for Industrial Hemp Cultivation,” by Sen. Don Coram and Reps. Donald Valdez & Marc Catlin. The bill confirms that a person with an absolute or conditional water right decreed for agricultural use may use the water subject to the water right for the growth or cultivation of industrial hemp if the person is registered by the Department of Agriculture to grow industrial hemp for commercial or research and development purposes.

Monday, May 22, 2017

  • HB 17-1104“Concerning the Exclusion from State Taxable Income of the Monetary Value of any Medal Won by an Athlete while Competing for the United States of America at the Olympic Games, so long as the Athlete’s Federal Adjusted Gross Income does not Exceed a Specified Amount,” by Rep. Clarice Navarro and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill specifies that for the purpose of determining the state income tax liability of an individual, income earned as a direct result of winning a medal while competing for the United States of America at the olympic games is excluded from state taxable income.
  • HB 17-1283“Concerning the Creation of a Task Force to Examine Workforce Resiliency in the Child Welfare System,” by Reps. Jonathan Singer & Dan Nordberg and Sens. John Cooke & Leroy Garcia. The bill creates a task force to organize county-level versions of and guidelines for child welfare caseworker resiliency programs modeled on national resiliency programs.
  • HB 17-1289“Concerning a Requirement that the State Engineer Promulgate Rules that Establish an Optional Streamlined Approach to Calculate the Historical Consumptive Use of a Water Right,” by Reps. Donald Valdez & Chris Hansen and Sens. Larry Crowder & Don Coram. The bill directs the state engineer to promulgate rules that take into account local conditions that an applicant can use to calculate historical consumptive use.
  • SB 17-074“Concerning the Creation of a Pilot Program in Certain Areas of the State Experiencing High Levels of Opioid Addiction to Award Grants to Increase Access to Addiction Treatment, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Leroy Garcia and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill reates the medication-assisted treatment (MAT) expansion pilot program, administered by the University of Colorado College of Nursing, to expand access to medication-assisted treatment to opioid-dependent patients in Pueblo and Routt counties.
  • SB 17-105“Concerning Consumers’ Right to Know their Electric Utility charges by requiring investor-owned electric utilities to provide their customers with a comprehensive breakdown of cost on their monthly bills,” by Sen. Leroy Garcia and Reps. Daneya Esgar & KC Becker. The bill requires an investor-owned electric utility to file with the public utilities commission for the commission’s review a comprehensive billing format that the investor-owned electric utility has developed for its monthly billing of customers.
  • SB 17-153“Concerning Establishment of the Southwest Chief and Front Range Passenger Rail Commission to Oversee the Preservation and Expansion of Amtrak Southwest Chief Rail Service in Colorado and Facilitate the Development and Operation of a Front Range Passenger Rail System that Provides Passenger Rail Service In and Along the Interstate 25 Corridor,” by Sens. Larry Crowder & Leroy Garcia and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill replaces the existing southwest chief rail line economic development, rural tourism, and infrastructure repair and maintenance commission, the current statutory authorization for which expires on July 1, 2017, with an expanded southwest chief and front range passenger rail commission.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

  • HB 17-1248“Concerning the Funding of Colorado Water Conservation Board Projects, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Appropriations,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sens. John Cooke & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill appropriates the following amounts from the Colorado Water Conservation Board construction fund to the CWCB or the Division of Water Resources for certain projects.
  • HB 17-1279“Concerning the Requirement that a Unit Owners’ Association Obtain Approval Through a Vote of Unit Owners Before Filing a Construction Defect Action,” by Reps. Alec Garnett & Lori Saine and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Jack Tate. The bill requires that, before the executive board of a unit owners’ association (HOA) in a common interest community brings suit against a developer or builder on behalf of unit owners based on a defect in construction work not ordered by the HOA itself, the board must notify the unit owners, call a meeting of the executive board, and obtain approval of a majority of unit owners.
  • HB 17-1280“Concerning Conforming Colorado Statutory Language Related to Disability Trusts to the Federal ’21st Century Cures Act’,” by Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Dave Young and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill conforms Colorado statutory language relating to the creation of a disability trust to conform to the language established in the federal ’21st Century Cures Act’. Specifically, it clarifies that the individual who is the beneficiary of a disability trust can also be the person who establishes such trust.
  • HB 17-1353“Concerning Implementing Medicaid Initiatives that Create Higher Value in the Medicaid Program Leading to Better Health Outcomes for Medicaid Clients, and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Implementation of the Accountable Care Collaborative and Authorizing Performance-based Provider Payments,” by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill authorizes the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to continue its implementation of the medicaid care delivery system, referred to as the accountable care collaborative (ACC).
  • SB 17-209“Concerning Access to the Ballot by Candidates,” by Sen. Kevin Priola and Rep. Mike Weissman. The bill makes various changes to the laws governing access to the ballot.
  • SB 17-232“Concerning Continuation under the Sunset Law of the Bingo-Raffle Advisory Board, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2016 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Sen. Stephen Fenberg and Rep. Paul Rosenthal. The bill The bill implements the recommendations of the sunset review and report on the licensing of bingo and other games of chance through the Secretary of State.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

  • HB 17-1155“Concerning the Ability to Cure Campaign Finance Reporting Deficiencies Without Penalty,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill requires the Secretary of State to give notice to the particular committee by e-mail of deficiencies alleged in a complaint pursuant to the campaign finance provisions of the state constitution or the ‘Fair Campaign Practices Act’ (FCPA).
  • HB 17-1317“Concerning the Authority of the State Historical Society to Dispose of Real Property Located on the Former Lowry Air Force Base,” by Reps. Daneya Esgar & Chris Hansen and Sens. John Kefalas & Randy Baumgardner. The bill grants the state historical society the authority to sell a vacant cold storage facility located on the former Lowry Air Force base.
  • HB 17-1342“Concerning Authorization for a County to Submit a Ballot Question for a County Public Safety Improvements Tax at a Biennial County or November Odd-year Election,” by Rep. Adrienne Benavidez and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill authorizes a county to submit a ballot question at a biennial county election or an election held in November of an odd-numbered year.
  • HB 17-1356“Concerning the Temporary Authority of the Colorado Economic Development Commission to Allow Certain Businesses to Treat Specific Existing Income Tax Credits Differently,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Daneya Esgar and Sens. Leroy Garcia & Jack Tate. The bill allows the Colorado economic development commission to allow certain businesses that make a strategic capital investment in the state, subject to a maximum amount, and subject to the requirements of the specified income tax credits, to treat any of the following income tax credits allowed to the business as either carryforwardable for a five-year period or as transferable under certain circumstances.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

  • HB 17-1072: “Concerning Human Trafficking for Sexual Servitude,” by Reps. Lois Landgraf & Polly Lawrence and Sen. John Cooke. The bill amends the language defining the crime of human trafficking for sexual servitude to include that a person who knowingly advertises, offers to sell, or sells travel services that facilitate activities defined as human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude commits the offense of human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude. ‘Travel services’ are defined in the bill.
  • HB 17-1190“Concerning the Limited Applicability of the Colorado Supreme Court’s Decision in St. Jude’s Co. v. Roaring Fork Club, LLC, 351 P.3d 442 (Colo. 2015),” by Rep. KC Becker and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill provides that the decision in the St. Jude’s Co. case interpreting section 37-92-103(4) does not apply to previously decreed absolute and conditional water rights or claims pending as of July 15, 2015. The interpretation of section 37-92-103 (4) in St. Jude’s Co. applies only to direct-flow appropriations, without storage, filed after July 15, 2015, for water diverted from a surface stream or tributary groundwater by a private entity for private aesthetic, recreational, and piscatorial purpose.
  • HB 17-1209“Concerning Peace Officer Designation for the Manager of the Office of Prevention and Security Within the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in the Department of Public Safety,” by Reps. Jovan Melton & Terri Carver and Sens. Rhonda Fields & John Cooke. The bill designates as a peace officer the manager of the office of prevention and security within the division of homeland security and emergency management in the department of public safety.
  • HB 17-1223“Concerning the Creation of a Fraud Reporting Hotline to be Administered by the State Auditor, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing Referral and Reporting Processes and State Auditor Investigative Authority,” by Reps. Lori Saine & Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Tim Neville. The bill requires the state auditor to establish and administer a telephone number, fax number, email address, mailing address, or internet-based form whereby any individual may report an allegation of fraud committed by a state employee or an individual acting under a contract with a state agency. This system is referred to in the bill as the ‘fraud hotline’ or ‘hotline’ and any report to the hotline as a ‘hotline call’.
  • HB 17-1238“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Debt Management and Collection Services from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Pete Lee and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill relocates the laws related to debt management and collection services from articles 14, 14.1, 14.3, and 14.5 of title 12.
  • HB 17-1239“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Private Occupational Schools from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Lucia Guzman. The bill creates a new article 64 in title 23 of the Colorado Revised Statutes and relocates the repealed provisions of article 59 of title 12 of the Colorado Revised Statutes to that article 64 and repeals article 59 of title 12 of the Colorado Revised Statutes.
  • HB 17-1240“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to the Department of Public Health and Environment from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. John Cooke. The bill relocates Article 29.3 of title 12 to part 6 of article 1.5 of title 25 and Article 30 of title 12 to article 48 of title 25.
  • HB 17-1243“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to Wholesale Sales Representatives from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Yeulin Willett and Sen. Lucia Guzman. The bill relocates article 66 of title 12, which relates to wholesale sales representatives, to title 13.
  • HB 17-1244: “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to Cemeteries from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill relocates article 12 of title 12, which relates to cemeteries, to title 6.
  • HB 17-1245“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to Public Establishments from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill relocates parts 1 and 3 of article 44 of title 12, which relate to public establishments, to title 6.
  • HB 17-1251“Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by Higher Education Agencies to the General Assembly,” by Rep. Dan Nordberg and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill addresses the reporting requirements of higher education agencies.
  • HB 17-1255: “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of a Report by the Board of Veterans Affairs to the General Assembly,” by Rep. Dan Nordberg and Sen. Andy Kerr. The bill continues indefinitely a reporting requirement of the board of veterans affairs.
  • HB 17-1257: “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by the Department of Natural Resources to the General Assembly,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill continues indefinitely reporting requirements of the Department of Natural Resources that were scheduled to repeal according to section 24-1-136(11)(a)(I).
  • HB 17-1265“Concerning an Increase in the Total Employer Contribution for Employers in the Judicial Division of the Public Employees’ Retirement Association,” by Reps. KC Becker & Dan Nordberg and Sens. Andy Kerr & Kevin Priola. For the calendar year beginning in 2019, for the judicial division only, the bill increases the AED to 3.40% of total payroll and requires the AED payment to increase by 0.4% of total payroll at the start of each of the following 4 calendar years through 2023.
  • HB 17-1267“Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by Educational Agencies to the General Assembly,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill addresses the reporting requirements of educational agencies.
  • HB 17-1295“Concerning the Repeal of the Governor’s Office of Marijuana Coordination,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals the office of marijuana coordination, effective July 1, 2017.
  • HB 17-1298: “Concerning the Date by Which the State Personnel Director is Required to Submit the Annual Compensation Report,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill changes the deadline for submission of the state personnel director’s annual report to September 15 of each year beginning with the 2017 report.
  • HB 17-1346“Concerning the Sale of More Than Fifteen Acres of Land at the Colorado Mental Health Institute at Fort Logan to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs for the Expansion of Fort Logan National Cemetery,” by Rep. Susan Lontine and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill grants the Department of Human Services authority to execute a land sale, at fair market value, to sell 51 additional acres, or up to 66 acres. The bill specifies that the proceeds of the sale of the additional 51 acres to the United States department of veterans affairs must be credited to the Fort Logan land sale account in the capital construction fund.
  • SB 17-222“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to Fireworks from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Yeulin Willett. The bill relocates article 28 of title 12, which relates to fireworks, to a new part 20 of article 33.5 of title 24, which title pertains to the department of public safety.
  • SB 17-225“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Farm Products from Title 12 of the Colorado Revised Statutes as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Yeulin Willett. The bill relocates part 2 of article 16 of title 12, the ‘Commodity Handler Act’, to article 36 of title 35; and part 1 of article 16 of title 12, the ‘Farm Products Act’, to article 37 of title 35.
  • SB 17-228“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of the Laws Related to Licenses Granted by Local Governments from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill relocates article 18 of title 12, which relates to dance halls, to title 30, which pertains to counties; article 25.5 of title 12, which relates to escort services, to title 29, which relates to local governments; and relocates article 56 of title 12, which relates to pawnbrokers, to title 29.
  • SB 17-242“Concerning Modernizing Terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes Related to Behavioral Health,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Kim Ransom & Joann Ginal. The bill updates and modernizes terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes related to behavioral health, mental health, alcohol abuse, and substance abuse.
  • SB 17-243“Concerning the Continuation under the Sunset Law of the Motorcycle Operator Safety Training Program by the Director of the Office of Transportation Safety in the Department of Transportation, and, in Connection Therewith, Transferring the Operation of the Program to the Chief of the State Patrol Beginning in 2018,” by Sens. Nancy Todd & Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Dominique Jackson. The bill continues the motorcycle operator safety training program for 3 years, until 2020.
  • SB 17-279“Concerning Clarification of the Applicability Provisions of Recent Legislation to Promote an Equitable Financial Contribution Among Affected Public Bodies in Connection with Urban Redevelopment Projects Allocating Tax Revenues,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Matt Gray & Susan Beckman. The bill clarifies the applicability provisions of legislation enacted in 2015 and 2016 to promote an equitable financial contribution among affected public bodies in connection with urban redevelopment projects allocating tax revenues.
  • SB 17-291“Concerning Continuation of the School Safety Resource Center Advisory Board,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Jeff Bridges. The bill implements the recommendations of the sunset review and report on the school safety resource center advisory board by eliminating the repeal date of the board and extending the board through September 1, 2022.
  • SB 17-293“Concerning Updating the Reference to a National Standard Setting Forth Certain Specifications Applicable to the Type of Paper Used to Publish the Colorado Revised Statutes,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill updates the statutory reference to the current applicable alkaline minimum reserve requirements and acidity levels for uncoated paper as established by the American national standards institute and the national information standards organization.
  • SB 17-294“Concerning the Nonsubstantive Revision of Statutes in the Colorado Revised Statutes, as Amended, and, in Connection Therewith, Amending or Repealing Obsolete, Imperfect, and Inoperative Law to Preserve the Legislative Intent, Effect, and Meaning of the Law,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill amends, repeals, and reconstructs various statutory provisions of law that are obsolete, imperfect, or inoperative. The specific reasons for each amendment or repeal are set forth in the appendix to the bill.
  • SB 17-304“Concerning the Authority of the Joint Technology Committee,” by Sens. Angela Williams & Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Dan Thurlow & Jonathan Singer. The bill adds definitions of ‘cybersecurity’ and ‘data privacy’ for the purposes of the joint technology committee. In addition, the bill modifies the definition of ‘oversee’ for the purposes of the committee to be consistent with other statutory provisions.

Friday, May 26, 2017

  • SB 17-254“Concerning the Provision for Payment of the Expenses of the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Departments of the State of Colorado, and of its Agencies and Institutions, For and During the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2017, Except as Otherwise Noted,” by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill provides for the payment of expenses of the executive, legislative, and judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2017, except as otherwise noted.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

  • SB 17-267“Concerning the Sustainability of Rural Colorado,” by Sens. Lucia Guzman & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. KC Becker & Jon Becker. The bill creates a new Colorado healthcare affordability and sustainability enterprise (CHASE) within the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing (HCPF), effective July 1, 2017, to charge and collect a healthcare affordability and sustainability fee that functions similarly to the repealed hospital provider fee. Because CHASE is an enterprise for purposes of the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), its revenue does not count against the state fiscal year spending limit.

For a list of the governor’s 2017 legislative actions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Disability Appeals Council Not Required to Expressly Evaluate Treating Physician’s Report

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Vallejo v. Berryhill on February 28, 2017.

Vallejo applied for supplemental security income benefits alleging that she had been disabled for several months. The Social Security Administration denied her claim. She received a hearing with an administrative law judge, who issued a decision adverse to Vallejo. The next day, Vallejo’s treating physician, Dr. Ratner, completed his opinion, which stated that Vallejo was bipolar with an extreme level of impairment. Vallejo requested the Appeals Council to review the ALJ’s decision and submitted Ratner’s opinion with her request. The Appeals Council denied review, stating that it considered Ratner’s opinion and additional evidence but found the evidence did not provide a basis for changing the ALJ’s decision. This rendered the ALJ’s decision the Commissioner’s final decision.

Vallejo sought judicial review of the Commission’s final decision. The district court found that the Appeals Council erred in not properly articulating its assessment of Ratner’s opinion in denying Vallejo’s request for review. The court reasoned that the Appeals Council was required to either assign Ratner’s opinion controlling weight or articulate reasons for assigning it a lesser weight. Because neither the ALJ nor the Appeals Council expressly evaluated Ratner’s opinion, the district court reversed the Commissioner’s decision and remanded to the Appeals Council to either determine what weight to give Ratner’s opinion or to remand to an ALJ with directions to make such a determination.

The Tenth Circuit held that it had jurisdiction to hear this appeal because the district court’s remand was a sentence-four remand. The Tenth Circuit held this because the district court did not retain jurisdiction and the remand was not solely for consideration of new evidence that was not before the Commissioner.

The Tenth Circuit addressed the issue of whether the district court’s determination that the Appeals Council failed to apply the correct legal standard was an error.

The Tenth Circuit held that the Appeals Circuit was not required to expressly analyze the new evidence of Ratner’s opinion. Rather, the statutes or regulations only require the Appeals Council to “consider” the new evidence. The Tenth Circuit acknowledges that an express analysis from the Appeals Council would be helpful to judicial review. But, further states that nothing in the statutes or regulations requires the Appeals Council to provide that analysis.

Therefore, the Tenth Circuit reversed the district court’s order reversing the Commissioner’s final decision and remanding to the Appeals Council. The Tenth Circuit remanded to the district court with directions to address Vallejo’s remaining arguments and determine if the Commissioner applied the correct legal standards and if substantial evidence in the administrative record supported the Commissioner’s final decision.

Bills Signed Adding Disabilities to Bias-Motivated Harassment, Clarifying Vehicle Title Transfers on Death, and More

On Wednesday, May 3, 2017, the governor signed 14 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 209 bills and vetoed one bill this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Wednesday include a bill to clarify the process for vehicle title transfers on death, a bill adding disabilities to bias-motivated harassment laws, a bill allowing mandatory reporters access to reports of abuse, a bill extending the agricultural water leasing pilot project, and more. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 17-1150“Concerning Disallowing a Court from Granting Bail After Conviction to Offenders who have Committed Certain Felony Crimes,” by Rep. Clarice Navarro and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill adds to the list of crimes for which bail is not allowed a second or subsequent conviction for stalking that occurs within 7 years after the date of a prior offense for which the person was convicted; stalking when there was a protection order, injunction, or condition of bond, probation, or parole or any other court order in effect that protected the victim from the person; and any offense that includes an act of domestic violence if the defendant at the time of sentencing has been previously convicted of three or more prior offenses that included an act of domestic violence.
  • HB 17-1185“Concerning Reports of Suspected Child Abuse or Neglect,” by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Jim Smallwood. The bill adds officials and employees of county departments of health, human services, or social services to the list of mandatory reporters and specifies that if a mandatory reporter continues to be involved with the child for whom he or she has filed a report, the reporter is entitled to access to records and reports of the abuse or neglect.
  • HB 17-1188“Concerning Bias-Motivated Harassment,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sens. Dominick Moreno & Don Coram. The bill adds physical or mental disability and sexual orientation to the categories described in the harassment statute to make the statute consistent with Colorado’s law concerning bias-motivated crimes.
  • HB 17-1213“Concerning the Transfer of a Vehicle Title Upon the Death of the Vehicle’s Owner,” by Rep. Kevin Van Winkle and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill amends the law regarding transfers of vehicle titles on death by clarifying that the Division of Motor Vehicles shall oversee the process, and clarifying that a personal representative or successor is not liable for obtaining a new certificate of title or for transferring title to the vehicle absent actual knowledge of the existence of a valid, unrevoked beneficiary designation form.
  • HB 17-1217“Concerning the Governance Structure of the State Historical Society,” by Reps. Faith Winter & Lori Saine and Sens. Jim Smallwood & Kerry Donovan. The bill repeals certain obsolete provisions of the statutes governing the structure of the State Historical Society and changes the language from establishing the council to allowing the board to establish the council.
  • HB 17-1219“Concerning an Extension of the Agricultural Water Leasing Pilot Program Administered by the Colorado Water Conservation Board,” by Reps. Jeni Arndt & Barbara McLaughlin and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Larry Crowder. The bill extends the agricultural water leasing pilot program.
  • HB 17-1233“Concerning Protection of the Historical Consumptive Use Analysis of a Water Right Involved in a Water Conservation Program,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill applies a rule statewide that provides that the reduced water usage that results from participation in a government-sponsored water conservation program will not be considered in analyzing the historical consumptive use of the water right.
  • SB 17-148“Concerning the Continuation of the Office of Boxing in the Division of Professions and Occupations in the Department of Regulatory Agencies, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2016 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies and Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Kevin Priola and Rep. Alec Garnett. The bill continues the Office of Boxing and vests the Director of the Division of Professions and Occupations with licensing authority.
  • SB 17-214“Concerning the Creation of the Voluntary Firefighter Cancer Benefits Program,” by Sens. Leroy Garcia & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Brittany Pettersen & Tony Exum. The bill allows an employer to participate in a voluntary firefighter cancer benefits program, as a multiple employer health trust to provide benefits to firefighters by paying contributions into the established trust.
  • SB 17-227: “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Attorneys-at-Law from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Sen.  Bob Gardner and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill relocates Article 5 of Title 12, “Attorneys-at-Law,” to a new Article 93 in Title 13, Colorado Revised Statutes.
  • SB 17-247“Concerning the Qualifications of Electricians, and, in Connection Therewith, Allowing Only persons who have Passed the Written Residential Wireman’s Examination to Act as Residential Inspectors and Waiving the Continuing Education Requirement During the First License Period for an Electrician who Passed the Appropriate Written Examination,” by Sen. Kevin Priola and Rep. Don Coram. The bill waives the continuing education requirement, otherwise applicable upon every renewal or reinstatement of an electrician’s license, for the first renewal or reinstatement of the license of an electrician who passed the appropriate written examination in connection with his or her initial license application.
  • SB 17-258“Concerning the Use of Open Educational Resources in Public Institutions of Higher Education, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill creates the Open Educational Resources Council in the Department of Higher Education. The bill directs the Department to contract with an entity to evaluate the existing use of open educational resources by public institutions of higher education.
  • SB 17-259“Concerning a Transfer of Money from the General Fund to Cash Funds Administered by State Departments for the Protection of the State’s Natural Resources,” by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer money from the general fund to certain state departments.
  • SB 17-268“Concerning an Increase in the Number of Pharmacy Technicians a Pharmacist may Supervise,” by Sens. Andy Kerr & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Joann Ginal & Kim Ransom. The bill allows a pharmacist to supervise up to 6 pharmacy technicians.

For a list of all of the governor’s 2017 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Administrative Fire Chief Engaged in Fire Protection Duties Under FPPA

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Dolan v. Fire & Police Pension Association on Thursday, April 20, 2017.

FirefighterInjuryOccupational Disability BenefitsFire and Police Pension AssociationPolicemen’s and Firemen’s Pension Reform ActFire ChiefAmended Complaint.

Dolan joined North Metro Fire Rescue in 1986, and in 2007, he sustained an injury that prevented him from passing the physical tests for firefighting duties. After approximately two years of attempted rehabilitation, North Metro terminated Dolan. Dolan promptly filed for occupational disability benefits with the Fire and Police Pension Association (FPPA).

While working for North Metro, Dolan also worked for the Elk Creek Fire Protection District: he was Elk Creek’s paid fire chief from 1998 through 2003; he returned as a volunteer in 2008; and in 2010, he was again hired as a paid fire chief.

Dolan initially received disability benefits, but these were later revoked based on a finding that because his position at Elk Creek had involved fire protection, he was ineligible for benefits under the Policemen’s and Firemen’s Pension Reform Act (the Act). A hearing officer recommended that Dolan repay the benefits he received after he signed his employment contract with Elk Creek in 2010, and the FPPA’s Board of Director’s (Board) affirmed the recommendation. Dolan filed for C.R.C.P. review of the Board’s decision in district court and also asserted several common law claims against FPPA. The district court affirmed the Board’s decision. Dolan then moved to amend his complaint, which was denied as untimely, and a trial was held on his remaining common law claims. The court found for FPPA and entered final judgment against Dolan.

On appeal, Dolan argued that the Board and the district court misapplied the law in discontinuing his disability benefits because, since his termination from North Metro, he was never re-employed in a position directly involved with the provision of fire protection under the Act. Re-employment in a full-time salaried position that directly involves the provision of fire protection precludes a firefighter from collecting disability benefits. Because Dolan acted in a command capacity at the scenes of fires and accidents, the hearing officer concluded it was not necessary to find that he was involved in “hands on” firefighting or medical care to conclude that his position was directly involved with the provision of fire protection. The Board adopted the hearing officer’s conclusions of fact and law that Dolan’s duties as Elk Creek fire chief directly involved fire protection. Because nothing in the Act suggests that re-employment at a position directly involved with the provision of fire protection must be limited to physically fighting fires, the district court and the Board did not misapply the law in determining that Dolan was no longer eligible for disability benefits after re-employment at Elk Creek.

Dolan also argued that the district court erred in denying his motion to amend his complaint when it determined his claim was untimely. Dolan sought leave to amend his complaint on August 30, 2013, approximately one year after he filed his initial complaint, seven months after the district court initially found in favor of the FPPA, and four months after the district court finalized its C.R.C.P. 106 order. Because Dolan presented the district court with an as-applied challenge to the FPPA regulations, the court correctly determined that claim was time barred by C.R.C.P. 106(b). Further, even if Dolan’s claim presented a facial challenge to the FPPA regulations, the court’s denial of his claim was not error because Dolan failed to show that his delay in bringing the claim was justified.

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Experience Interactive “People in Crisis” Exercise at the Criminal Law Spring Update

Often, people come to lawyers during a period of crisis, looking to their lawyer for assistance and comfort. Perhaps they are newly unemployed, or have lost a loved one, or are going through a contentious divorce. Or perhaps the client is experiencing poverty and all its attendant problems. While lawyers may be familiar intellectually with the statistics of poverty, many have not actually experienced it.

This year’s Criminal Law Spring Update is a unique interactive simulation of clients in crisis. Each participant will assume the role of a family member with limited resources. Some participants will be newly unemployed, some will have been recently deserted by the “breadwinner,” and some will be senior citizens living on fixed incomes or raising grandchildren. The participants will be tasked with providing for basic necessities and shelter with limited resources.

This program is designed to provide perspective to attorneys whose clients may be experiencing similar situations. The exercise will let participants experience some of the emotional stresses and frustrations created by having limited resources, as well as the difficult choices people with few resources feel they may need to make in order to survive. The program will begin with an introduction, move into the simulation, and then have a debriefing period in which participants will have the opportunity to share their experiences and talk about what they have learned during the exercise. The afternoon will be a more traditional CLE program, where we will discuss bond and sentencing issues, and how poverty affects these issues.

Register now for this unique opportunity to experience the effects of poverty on legal issues from the client’s perspective. Call (303) 860-0608 to register or click the links below.

 

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CLE Program: Criminal Law Spring Update – LIVE ONLY!

This CLE presentation will occur on May 2, 2017, at the Ralph L. Carr Judicial Center (2 E. 14th Ave. in Denver), from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Register for the live program here. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.