May 23, 2018

Bills Signed Changing Definition of “Similar Coverage” for Workers’ Compensation Coverage of Certain Commercial Vehicle Operators and More

On Friday, May 4, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 12 bills into law. To date, he has signed 223 bills and sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Friday include a bill changing procedures for recalls of directors of special districts, a bill changing the definition of “similar coverage” for workers’ compensation purposes for certain operators of commercial vehicles, and more. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-076 – “Concerning a Ban on Vote Trading,” by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill makes it a misdemeanor criminal offense for a person to trade a vote or offer to trade a vote with another elector in this state or a person in another state in exchange for the other person’s vote for or against a particular candidate, ballot issue, or ballot question.
  • SB 18-143 – “Concerning Measures to Increase Revenue for the Parks and Wildlife Division, and, in Connection Therewith, Setting Certain Hunting, Fishing, Parks, and Recreation Fees,” by Sens. Steven Fenberg & Don Coram and Reps. Jeni James Arndt & James Wilson. The bill makes several changes to the statutes in the “Hunting, Fishing, and Parks for Future Generations Act.”
  • SB 18-178 – “Concerning the Definition of Similar Coverage for Workers’ Compensation for Certain Operators of Commercial Vehicles,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. Current law requires independent operators of commercial vehicles to have workers’ compensation or a private insurance policy that provides similar coverage. The bill changes ‘private insurance policy’ to ‘occupational accident coverage insurance policy’ and specifies the requirements for when such a policy may be considered as providing similar coverage.
  • SB 18-207 – “Concerning Authority for the Department of Human Services to Retain Amounts from Certain Cash Funds for its Indirect Costs,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill authorizes the department of human services to retain money for its indirect costs, based on a federally approved cost allocation plan, from the older Coloradans cash fund and the nurse home visitor program fund.
  • HB 18-1040 – “Concerning Incentives for Provision of Sex Offender Services in the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Adrienne Benavidez and Sen. Rhonda Fields. The bill requires the department of corrections to monitor the number of inmates who need sex offender treatment or services and the number who are not receiving such treatment or services, develop an incentive plan to contract for more mental health professionals to provide sex offender treatment or services in difficult-to-serve geographic areas, and report to the joint budget committee the number of inmates needing treatment or services, the number not receiving the treatment or services, and the impact of the incentive plan.
  • HB 18-1235 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Custom Meat Processors, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2017 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Chris Hansen & Hugh McKean and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill implements the recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies in its sunset review and report on the ‘Custom Processing of Meat Animals Act.’
  • HB 18-1240 – “Concerning the Continuation of a Grant Program to Prevent Motor Vehicle Theft, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Sunset Review Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Jeff Bridges & Jon Becker and Sen. John Cooke. The bill continues the automobile theft prevention authority and the automobile theft prevention board until 2029.
  • HB 18-1265 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Stroke Advisory Board in Accordance with the Recommendation in the Department of Regulatory Agencies’ 2017 Sunset Report,” by Reps. Susan Lontine & Susan Beckman and Sen. Larry Crowder. The Bill implements the recommendation in the department of regulatory agencies’ sunset review of the stroke advisory board by continuing the board but imposes a 10-year sunset period rather than continuing the board indefinitely, as was recommended.
  • HB 18-1268 – “Concerning the Procedures to Recall a Director of a Special District,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill requires the court as defined for the special district to appoint a designated election official to oversee the recall election. The director and the director’s spouse or civil union partner cannot serve as the DEO. The bill requires that recall petitions must be approved as to form by the DEO before being circulated.
  • HB 18-1305 – “Concerning a Voluntary Contribution Designation Benefiting the Young Americans Center for Financial Education Fund that Appears on the State Individual Tax Return Forms,” by Reps. James Coleman & Patrick Neville and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill creates the Young Americans Center for Financial Education fund in the state treasury. A voluntary contribution designation line for the fund will appear on the state individual income tax return form for the 5 income tax years following the year that the executive director of the Department of Revenue certifies to the revisor of statutes that there is space on the form and the fund is next in the queue.
  • HB 18-1329 – “Concerning a Supplemental State Payment to Qualified Providers of Durable Medical Equipment who Experienced a Decrease in Reimbursement in the 2017-18 State Fiscal Year as a Result of the Implementation of the Federal ’21st Century Cures Act,’ and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill authorizes a supplemental payment of state-only money to qualified providers of durable medical equipment who experienced a decrease in reimbursement in the 2017-18 state fiscal year as a result of the implementation of the federal ’21st Century Cures Act.’
  • HB 18-1338 – “Concerning Transfers to Address the Reduction of Revenues in the Severance Tax Operational Fund,” by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kent Lambert. Under current law, money is transferred from the severance tax operational fund to certain cash funds to benefit programs that are commonly referred to as the tier 2 programs. On June 30, 2018, the bill requires the state treasurer to transfer money to the operational fund from specified cash funds to recoup money that was previously transferred in this fiscal year for tier 2 programs.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Signed Modifying Public Trustee Foreclosure Process, Lowering Mandatory Parole for Certain Felonies, and More

On Monday, April 23, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 20 bills into law. To date, he has signed 169 bills and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. Some of the bills signed Monday include a bill modifying the Public Trustee Foreclosure process, a bill lowering mandatory parole for certain felonies, a bill allowing discretionary parole of special needs offenders, and more. The bills signed Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1008 – “Concerning the Financing of the Division of Parks and Wildlife’s Aquatic Nuisance Species Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating an Aquatic Nuisance Species Stamp for the Operation of Motorboats and Sailboats in Waters of the State, Increasing Penalties Related to the Introduction of Aquatic Nuisance Species into the Waters of the State, and Combining Two Separate Funds Related to the Aquatic Nuisance Species Program into One Fund,” by Reps. Daneya Esgar & Jeni James Arndt and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Don Coram. The bill updates a legislative declaration concerning aquatic nuisance species to encourage the federal government to dedicate sufficient funding and resources to the detection, prevention, control, and eradication of aquatic nuisance species for federally owned or managed aquatic resources and water infrastructure in Colorado.
  • HB 18-1025 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Alcohol Beverages from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sens. John Cooke & Bob Gardner. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates laws related to the regulation of alcohol beverages to the new Title 44.
  • HB 18-1029 – “Concerning Lowering the Period of Mandatory Parole from Five Years to Three Years for Certain Felony Offenses,” by Rep. Mike Weissman and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. Under current law, the length of a mandatory parole sentence for a class 2 and 3 felony is 5 years. The bill lowers the length of mandatory parole for a class 2 felony if the offense is not a crime of violence and a class 3 felony to 3 years.
  • HB 18-1047 – “Concerning Technical Modifications to the ‘Fair Campaign Practices Act’ to Facilitate its Administration,” by Rep. Susan Lontine and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill makes technical modifications to the “Fair Campaign Practices Act” (FCPA) to facilitate its administration.
  • HB 18-1065 – “Concerning Discipline of a Department of Human Services Employee when the Employee is Found to have Mistreated a Vulnerable Person,” by Reps. Susan Beckman & Janet Buckner and Sens. Kent Lambert. Current law specifies when an employee of the Department of Human Services will be suspended or dismissed after being charged with specified criminal offenses. However, the Department has encountered difficulty in suspending, dismissing, or otherwise disciplining employees through the administrative process when the employee was involved in an egregious incident of mistreatment of a vulnerable person but was not convicted of a criminal offense. The bill specifies that in considering a disciplinary action against an employee for engaging in mistreatment, abuse, neglect, or exploitation, against a vulnerable person, the appointing authority shall give weight to the safety of vulnerable persons over the interests of any other person.
  • HB 18-1098 – “Concerning the Expanded Ability of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to Finance the Remediation of Oil and Gas Locations,” by Reps. Lori Saine & Matt Gray and Sen. Vicki Marble. Under current practice, expenditures by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to address the mitigation of adverse environmental impacts of oil and gas operations are paid from the environmental response account of the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund, and the year-end balance of the account transfers into the fund. The bill specifies that the year-end balance of the account remains in the account.
  • HB 18-1109 – “Concerning Discretionary Parole of Special Needs Offenders,” by Rep. Mike Weissman and Sen. John Cooke. The bill makes several changes to the process of determining parole for special needs offenders.
  • HB 18-1191 – “Concerning a Local Authority’s Ability to Alter Speed Limits Within the Local Authority’s Jurisdiction,” by Rep. Faith Winter and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & John Kefalas. Current law requires county and municipal authorities (authorities) to conduct a traffic investigation or survey before increasing or decreasing the speed limits within the authority’s jurisdiction. The bill allows the authority to also consider certain other factors.
  • HB 18-1227 – “Concerning the Authority of the Real Estate Commission to Issue Licenses for an Initial Period of Less than Three Years,” by Reps. Leslie Herod & Cole Wist and Sen. John Cooke. The bill authorizes the Real Estate Commission to issue licenses that expire on December 31 of the year of issuance.
  • HB 18-1242 – “Concerning the Salary Categorization of Locally Elected Officers in Specified Counties,” by Reps. KC Becker & Donald Valdez and Sens. Larry Crowder & Randy Baumgardner. Current law categorizes each county for purposes of establishing the salaries of elected county officials in the county. The statutory salary amounts are adjusted every 2 years for inflation and take effect for terms commencing after any change is made. The bill modifies the categories of 4 counties with the accompanying percentage increase in salary.
  • HB 18-1254 – “Concerning the Modification of the Foreclosure Process on Property that is Encumbered by a Deed of Trust,” by Rep. Kevin Van Winkle and Sen. Jim Smallwood. The bill makes several modifications to the public trustee foreclosure process, including eliminating the authority of the holder’s attorney to specify a newspaper for publication, allowing an amended combined notice to be omitted in certain circumstances, modifying the amounts of deposits required for fees and costs of the public trustee, and more.
  • HB 18-1327 – “Concerning the All-Payer Health Claims Database, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill authorizes the General Assembly to appropriate general fund money to the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to pay for expenses related to the all-payer health claims database.
  • HB 18-1330 – “Concerning a Supplemental State Payment Relating to Certain Office-Administered Oncology-Related Drugs for Qualified Providers under the Medical Assistance Program who Experienced a Reduction in Reimbursement Payments in the 2017-18 State Fiscal Year as a Result of the Implementation of the Federal Final Rules for Covered Outpatient Drugs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill authorizes a supplemental payment of state-only money to providers under the medicaid program of certain office-administered drugs relating to oncology who experienced a decrease in aggregate reimbursements in the 2017-18 fiscal year as a result of the implementation of the federal department of health and human services final rule for covered outpatient drugs, 81 FR 5169, published in the federal register on February 1, 2016.
  • SB 18-014 – “Concerning Requiring the Department of Corrections to Disclose the Location of Inmates who are Relocated to Facilities Outside of the State,” by Sens. Rhonda Fields & John Cooke and Reps. Cole Wist & Leslie Herod. The bill states that if the Department of Corrections relocates an inmate for incarceration or contracts with another state for the incarceration of an inmate in a penal institution in another state, then not later than 48 hours after such relocation, the Department shall notify the prosecuting attorney and any registered victim of crimes for which the inmate is serving his or her sentence of the name and location of the penal institution where the inmate is to be housed, with certain exceptions.
  • SB 18-026 – “Concerning Measures to Make Sex Offender Registration More Effective,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Reps. Pete Lee, Leslie Herod, and Yeulin Willett. The bill makes several changes to the sex offender registration process.
  • SB 18-055 – “Concerning the Crimes Against Children Surcharge in Cases Involving Trafficking of Children,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & Edie Hooten. Current law requires each person who is convicted of a crime against a child to pay a surcharge to the clerk of the court for the judicial district in which the conviction occurs. The bill adds the crime of human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude to the definition of crime against a child for purposes of the surcharge.
  • SB 18-149 – “Concerning Records of the Board of Directors of the Denver Health and Hospital Authority,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Matt Gray & Leslie Herod. The bill specifies that certain reports, statements, agreements, bonds, guidelines, manuals, handbooks, and accounts of the authority are public records. The bill also specifies that the content of an electronic medical record system and individual medical records or medical information are not public records.
  • SB 18-151 – “Concerning Department of Education Research to Develop Bullying Prevention Policies,” by Sens. Rhonda Fields & Kevin Priola and Reps. Janet Buckner & James Wilson. The bill requires the Department of Education to research approaches, policies, and practices in other states related to bullying prevention and education, and to develop a model bullying prevention and education policy after considering its research.
  • SB 18-174 – “Concerning Liability of Entities that Provide Services to Persons with Developmental Disabilities in Residential Settings,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Lang Sias. The bill defines ‘case management agency’ and adds a case management agency to the definition of ‘provider’ that provides services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities. The bill requires providers and service agencies to operate pursuant to department of health care policy and financing rules.
  • SB 18-188 – “Concerning Agricultural Commodities, and, in Connection Therewith, Adding Millet to the Definition of an Agricultural Commodity and Allowing the Commissioner of Agriculture to Determine Marketing Order Public Announcement Requirements,” by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. Jeni James Arndt & Jon Becker. The bill adds millet to the definition of an agricultural commodity in the “Colorado Agricultural Marketing Act of 1939.” The bill removes the requirement that marketing order issuance, suspension, amendment, or termination be posted in the office of the commissioner of agriculture and published in a newspaper.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Supreme Court: Circulator for Representative Lamborn’s Gubernatorial Ballot Petition was Not a Resident of Colorado, Therefore Signatures Invalid

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Kuhn v. Williams on Monday, April 23, 2018.

Election Law.

In this expedited appeal under C.R.S. § 1-1-113(3), the supreme court addressed whether the Colorado Secretary of State (Secretary) could certify incumbent Representative Doug Lamborn to the 2018 Republican primary ballot for Colorado’s Fifth Congressional District. Relying solely on the Colorado Election Code, the court concluded he may not.

The court held that although the Secretary properly relied on the circulator’s affidavit and information in the voter registration system in verifying the petition and issuing a statement of sufficiency, petitioners nonetheless had the statutory right to challenge the validity of the petition under C.R.S. §§ 1-4-909 and 1-1-113 before the Secretary certified Rep. Lamborn’s name to the ballot. Petitioners properly presented additional evidence to the district court in challenging the actual residence of the petition circulators.

The court concluded that the district erred when it focused on the challenged circulator’s subjective intent to move back to Colorado, rather than the test set forth in C.R.S. § 1-2-102, when determining the challenged circulator’s residency. In applying the correct test to the essentially undisputed facts here, the court concluded that the challenged circulator was not a resident of Colorado when he served as a circulator for the Lamborn campaign. Accordingly, the court reversed the district court’s ruling to the contrary. Because the challenged circulator was statutorily ineligible to serve as a circulator, the signatures he collected are invalid and may not be considered. That caused the Lamborn campaign’s number of signatures to fall short of the 1,000 required to be on the Republican primary ballot.

Therefore, the court held that the Secretary may not certify Rep. Lamborn to the 2018 primary ballot for Colorado’s Fifth Congressional District. The court did not address the Lamborn campaign’s arguments regarding the constitutionality of the circulator residency requirement in C.R.S. § 1-4-905(1) because the court lacks jurisdiction to address such claims in a proceeding under C.R.S. § 1-1-113.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Bills Signed Regarding Ground Water Commission Approval of Aquifer Storage and Recovery Plans, Repealing Procedures to Fill Municipal Vacancies, and More

On Monday, April 9, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 12 bills into law. To date, he has signed 126 bills into law and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Monday include a bill to increase transparency in higher education statutes concerning military service, a bill repealing procedures to fill vacancies in candidate nominations for municipal elections, a bill allowing the Colorado Oil and Gas Commission to roll-over its year-end balances in order to facilitate financing, and more. The bills signed Monday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-107 – “Concerning the Repeal of Procedures to Fill Vacancies in Candidate Nominations for Elections Conducted under the ‘Colorado Municipal Code of 1965,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the process by which a vacancy in nomination may be filled for an election conducted under the ‘Colorado Municipal Code of 1965’ and makes conforming amendments.
  • HB 18-1098 – “Concerning the Expanded Ability of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to Finance the Remediation of Oil and Gas Locations,” by Reps. Lori Saine & Matt Gray and Sen. Vicki Marble. Under current practice, expenditures by the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission to address the mitigation of adverse environmental impacts of oil and gas operations are paid from the environmental response account of the oil and gas conservation and environmental response fund, and the year-end balance of the account transfers into the fund. The bill specifies that the year-end balance of the account remains in the account.
  • HB 18-1112 – “Concerning Covered Health Care Services Provided by a Pharmacist,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Daneya Esgar and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires a health benefit plan to provide coverage for health care services provided by a pharmacist if the services are provided within a health professional shortage area and the health benefit plan provides coverage for the same services provided by a licensed physician or advanced practice nurse.
  • HB 18-1134 – “Concerning Eligibility of Kindergarten Students Funded through Early Childhood At-risk Enhancement Positions,” by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson and Sens. Michael Merrifield & Beth Martinez Humenik. If a district chooses to use early childhood at-risk enhancement (ECARE) positions to enroll children in the district’s full-day kindergarten program, children using the ECARE positions must satisfy at least one of the eligibility requirements of the Colorado preschool program.
  • HB 18-1145 – “Concerning the Repeal of Laws Regulating Ballot Issue Petition Circulators that have been Permanently Enjoined from Enforcement,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals laws ordered permanently enjoined from enforcement in Independence Inst. v. Gessler , 936 F. Supp. 2d 1256 (D. Colo. 2013).
  • HB 18-1148 – “Concerning the Prohibition Against a Carrier Requiring Step Therapy for Covered Persons with Stage Four Advanced Metastatic Cancer,” by Rep. Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill prohibits a carrier that issues a health benefit plan that covers treatment for stage four advanced metastatic cancer from requiring a cancer patient to undergo step therapy prior to receiving a drug approved by the United States food and drug administration if use of the approved drug is consistent with best practices for treatment of the cancer and as long as the drug is on the carrier’s prescription drug formulary.
  • HB 18-1172 – “Concerning Money Allocated from an Appropriation from the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund to a Designated Managed Service Organization to Implement its Community Action Plan,” by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill amends the ‘Increasing Access to Effective Substance Use Disorder Services Act’ to clarify that a designated managed service organization (designated MSO) may use money allocated to it from the marijuana tax cash fund for expenditures for substance use disorder services and for any start-up costs or other expenses necessary to increase capacity to provide such services and may allow allocations to roll forward.
  • HB 18-1199 – “Concerning a Process for the Ground Water Commission to Use for Approving Aquifer Storage-and-Recovery Plans, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring that the Ground Water Commission Promulgate Rules Governing its Implementation of the Process,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill authorizes a person to apply to the ground water commission (commission) for approval of an aquifer storage-and-recovery plan and requires the commission to promulgate rules governing the application process and the requirements that an aquifer storage-and-recovery plan must meet to be approved.
  • HB 18-1228 – “Concerning Increasing Transparency in Higher Education Statutes Relating to Military Service,” by Reps. Justin Everett & Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sen. Leroy Garcia. The bill creates a new article 7.4 in title 23, Colorado Revised Statutes, with the article heading ‘Military Members, Veterans, and Dependents’, in order to locate physically within the same article, whenever practicable, higher education provisions relating to the military.
  • HB 18-1238 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Wildland-Urban Interface Training Advisory Board, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2017 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Dominique Jackson & Marc Catlin and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill implements the recommendation of the Department of Regulatory Agencies to sunset the wildland-urban interface training advisory board.
  • HB 18-1246 – “Concerning Updates to the “Colorado Nursery Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Modernizing the Act and Protecting Agriculture from Pests, Diseases, and Noxious Weeds,” by Rep. Jessie Danielson and Sen. Don Coram. The bill updates the ‘Colorado Nursery Act’, last amended in 2009, to protect nursery stock.
  • HB 18-1293 – “Concerning Payment of Expenses of the Legislative Department,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Patrick Neville and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Lucia Guzman. The bill makes appropriations for matters related to the legislative department for the 2018-19 state fiscal year.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Signed Regarding Appropriating Retail Marijuana Sales Tax to Schools, Clarifying Standard for Deceptive Trade Practices, and More

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the governor signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 55 bills this legislative session. Many of Thursday’s bills involved the relocation of statutes from Title 12. Some of the other bills signed include a bill to clarify which entities are eligible to apply for special event beverage licenses, a bill appropriating retail marijuana sales tax to schools, a bill changing the date of special district elections to May every-other year, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1027 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of the Lottery from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the sections of Title 12 related to the regulation of the lottery to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1028 – “Concerning Clarification of the Standard Required for Applications for a Court Order to Require Compliance with Investigations of Deceptive Trade Practices,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Lois Court & Jack Tate. The bill would allow a judge to issue a court order if compliance with an investigation is necessary to investigate a deceptive trade practice.
  • HB 18-1039 – “Concerning Changing Regular Special District Elections to May of Each Odd-numbered Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Adjusting the Length of Terms Served by Directors Elected in 2020 and 2022 in Order to Implement the New Election Schedule,” by Rep. Kim Ransom and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill moves regular special district elections to the Tuesday following the first Monday of May in odd-numbered years, rather than the Tuesday immediately succeeding the first Monday of May in every even-numbered year, starting in 2023.
  • HB 18-1087 – “Concerning Department of Public Safety Authority to Repeal Rules Relating to Defunct Boards,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sens. Don Coram & Daniel Kagan. The victims compensation and assistance coordinating committee and the victims assistance and law enforcement advisory board in the department of public safety were repealed in 2009. The bill gives the executive director of the department of public safety the authority to repeal rules relating to those repealed boards.
  • HB 18-1096 – “Concerning the Eligibility of Certain Entities to Apply for a Special Event Permit to Sell Alcohol Beverages,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill adds to the list of organizations authorized to obtain a special event permit to sell alcohol beverages for a limited period an organization that is incorporated under Colorado law for educational purposes.
  • HB 18-1100 – “Concerning the Continuous Appropriation of Money in the Educator Licensure Cash Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill extends the continuous appropriation of money to the State Board of Education and the Department of Education (Department) for its expenses incurred in the administration of the “Colorado Educator Licensing Act of 1991” for three more years.
  • HB 18-1101 – “Concerning Modification of the Manner in which Gross Retail Marijuana Tax Revenue that is Transferred from the General Fund to the State Public School Fund as Required by Current Law is Appropriated from the State Public School Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. Beginning in the 2018-19 fiscal year, the bill requires 12.59% of the gross retail marijuana sales tax revenue remaining in the general fund after a required allocation of 10% of the revenue to local governments to be transferred to the state public school fund, and continuously appropriates that revenue for the same state fiscal year in which it is transferred from the state public school fund to the department of education to help meet the state share of total program funding for school districts and institute charter schools.
  • HB 18-1140 – “Concerning Public Official Personal Surety Bonds, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing Obsolete Provisions and Authorizing the Purchase of Insurance in Lieu of Public Official Personal Surety Bonds,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals obsolete provisions related to personal surety bonds and authorizes a public entity to purchase insurance in lieu of a public official personal surety bond and states the requirements for the insurance.
  • SB 18-036 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Tobacco Sales to Minors from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44, then relocates the sections of Title 24 regarding the regulation of tobacco sales to minors to Title 44.
  • SB 18-091 – “Concerning Modernizing Terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes Related to Behavioral Health,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill is a follow-up and clean-up to Senate Bill 17-242, which updated and modernized terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes related to behavioral health, including mental health disorders, alcohol use disorders, and substance use disorders.
  • SB 18-092 – “Concerning Updating Statutory References to ‘County Departments of Social Services,'” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes outdated references in statute to “County Department(s) of Social Services,” or similar terms, to “County Department(s) of Human or Social Services.” Counties throughout the state have different ways of referring to the department in the county that does human or social services work, so it is necessary for statute to reflect that not all county departments go by one label.
  • SB 18-094 – “Concerning the Repeal of a Duplicate Definitions Section in Article 60 of Title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill repeals section 27-60-102.5, Colorado Revised Statutes, which is a duplicate definitions section for general provisions related to behavioral health found in article 60 of title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes. The bill leaves in place section 27-60-100.3, Colorado Revised Statutes, enacted by Senate Bill 17-242.
  • SB 18-100 – “Concerning Disclosure of Additional Mandatory Charges by Motor Vehicle Rental Companies,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill requires a motor vehicle rental company to disclose to a potential customer, in any vehicle rental cost quote and in the rental agreement, additional mandatory charges applicable to the motor vehicle rental.
  • SB 18-103 – “Concerning the Issuance of Performance-based Incentives for Film Production Activities in the State,” by Sens. Nancy Todd & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Timothy Leonard. The bill strengthens the requirements necessary to earn performance-based incentives for film production activities in the state in various ways.
  • SB 18-164 – “Concerning the Repeal of Reporting Requirements for Certain Unfunded Programs in the Department of Human Services Until Such Time as Funding is Received,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill directs that reporting requirements for programs established in the department of human services that have not received funding in several years be placed on hold until such time as the program receives funding.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Supreme Court: Political Committee Must Report Payments to Law Firm as Contributions, Not Expenditures

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Campaign Integrity Watchdog v. Alliance for a Safe and Independent Woodmen Hills on Monday, January 30, 2018.

Election Law—Constitutional Law—Political Speech.

The supreme court held that a political committee must report payments to a law firm for its legal defense as contributions, but not as expenditures. “[E]xpenditures . . . and obligations” under C.R.S. § 1-45-108(1)(a)(I) are limited to payments and obligations for expressly advocating the election or defeat of a candidate; payments for legal defense are not for express electoral advocacy. But, pursuant to Colo. Const. art. XXVIII, § 2(5)(a)(II), payments to a third-party law firm for a political committee’s legal defense count as reportable contributions because they are payments “made to a third party for the benefit of any . . . political committee.”

The court reversed the administrative law judge’s determination that the contribution-reporting requirement is unconstitutional as applied to Alliance for a Safe and Independent Woodmen Hills (Alliance). Under Buckley v. Valeo, 424 U.S. 1, 61–68 (1976), for political committees like Alliance whose major purpose is influencing elections, the governmental interests in political transparency and preventing corruption justify the First Amendment burdens of reporting and disclosure. It makes little difference that the payments here were made post-election and for legal defense; elections are cyclical and money is fungible.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Lawyer’s Donations of Legal Services Were Not “Contributions” Under Campaign Finance Law

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Coloradans for a Better Future v. Campaign Integrity Watchdog on Monday, January 29, 2018.

Election Law—Disclosure.

A lawyer filed a report for Coloradans for a Better Future (Better Future), a political organization, without charging a fee. The supreme court reversed the court of appeals’ determination that Better Future was required to report the donated legal service as a “contribution” under Colorado’s campaign-finance laws. The constitutional definition of “contribution” does not address political organizations, and neither part of the statutory definition relied on by the court of appeals covers legal services donated to political organizations. C.R.S. § 1-45-103(6)(b) does not apply to political organizations, and the word “gift” in C.R.S. § 1-45-103(6)(c)(I) does not include gifts of service.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Election Challenge Time-Barred When Filed and Equitable Tolling Did Not Apply

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in UMB Bank, N.A. v. Landmark Towers Association, Inc. on Monday, December 11, 2017.

Taxpayer Bill of Rights—Election Challenges—C.R.S. § 1-11-213(4)—Non-claim Statutes.

This case principally required the supreme court to determine whether the 10-day time limitation set forth in C.R.S. § 1-11-213(4) barred respondent homeowners association’s challenge to an election authorizing the issuance of bonds and the collection of debt pursuant to the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Respondent contended that the election was invalid because its members were eligible electors, and these electors did not receive notice of the election and were not given an opportunity to vote in it. It is undisputed that respondent did not file its election challenge until more than three years after the statutory deadline. The question thus was whether respondent’s challenge could proceed, based on the equitable tolling doctrine or the exception for certain types of claims articulated in Cacioppo v. Eagle County School District Re-50J, 92 P.3d 453 (Colo. 2004). With regard to equitable tolling, the court concluded that C.R.S. § 1-11-213(4) is a non-claim statute. Accordingly, the doctrine of equitable tolling does not apply. As to Cacioppo, the court concluded that respondent’s claim is not a challenge to the substance of the ballot issue but rather is a challenge to the means by which the election results were obtained. The court thus concluded that respondent’s claim is subject to C.R.S. § 1-11-213(4)’s 10-day time limit and that its challenge to the bond and tax election at issue was time barred. Accordingly, the court reversed the judgment of the court of appeals and remanded the case for further proceedings.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: C.R.C.P. 106 Time Limit for Filing is Constitutional As Applied

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Adams v. Sagee on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

Citizen Right of Initiative—Filing Deadline.

Plaintiffs petitioned to present a ballot initiative to the residents of Sheridan. Sheridan’s City Clerk, Sagee, rejected some of the signatures plaintiffs had collected, leaving them short of the number required for the initiative to be considered. Plaintiffs contested the decision, and the City Clerk upheld it after a protest hearing. Plaintiffs filed a complaint in district court 35 days later pursuant to C.R.S. § 31-11-110(3). The district court dismissed the case for lack of subject matter jurisdiction because plaintiffs failed to file within the C.R.C.P. 106 28-day time limit.

On appeal, plaintiffs conceded that the 28-day jurisdictional bar applied and they filed 35 days after the relevant final decision. They argued that strict application of the time limit to them as pro se parties deprived them of their constitutional right of initiative. The Colorado Court of Appeals construed plaintiffs’ argument to be an as-applied challenge to the constitutionality of the statutory time bar. The court found plaintiffs pro se status irrelevant; pro se parties must comply with procedural rules to the same extent as parties represented by attorneys. The court concluded that applying C.R.C.P. 106(b)’s jurisdictional deadline to plaintiffs’ Rule 106(a)(4) petition does not deprive them of or unduly burden their constitutional right of initiative.

The judgment was affirmed.

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Colorado Court of Appeals: Payments for Vendor Tables at Republican Convention Were Not Political Contributions

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Campaign Integrity Watchdog v. Colorado Republican Committee on Thursday, October 5, 2017.

Administrative Law Judge—Campaign Contributions—Value of Services—Reportable—C.R.S. §§ 1-45-108(1)(a)(I) and -103(6)(b).

An administrative law judge (ALJ) held a hearing and determined that the Colorado Republican Committee (CRC) improperly failed to report three payments for vendor tables at its 2016 Republican Party assembly and convention. The CRC was fined and sanctioned for failing to report contributions.

On appeal, CRC contended that the ALJ erred in determining that the three payments for vendor tables at the convention were reportable contributions under state law and not properly reported by CRC. C.R.S. § 1-45-108(1)(a)(I) requires political committees to report receipt of contributions of $20 or more and to report expenditures and obligations. C.R.S. § 1-45-103(6)(b), which defines “contribution,” applies to all contributions “for which the contributor receives compensation or consideration,” and thus applies to the payments at issue here. Under the plain language of this section, political parties are required to report only that portion of payments for services that exceeds the value of the services rendered. Here, Campaign Integrity Watchdog provided no evidence that the value of the vendor tables was actually less than the $350 CRC charged. Therefore, the ALJ erred in finding that the payments at issue were reportable contributions under state law.

The part of the order imposing a fine and sanctions against CRC for failing to disclose the relevant payments was reversed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: 42 U.S.C. § 1988 Damages Not Properly Awarded Under Colorado Election Code

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Frazier v. Williams, Colorado Secretary of State on Monday, September 11, 2017.

Election Proceedings under C.R.S. § 1-1-113—42 U.S.C. § 1983—Supremacy Clause.

The Colorado Supreme Court held that claims brought under C.R.S. § 1-1-113 are limited to those alleging a breach or neglect of duty or other wrongful act under the Colorado Election Code. The language of C.R.S. § 1-1-113 limits claims that may be brought to those alleging a breach or neglect of duty or other wrongful act under “this code,” meaning the Colorado Election Code. The court emphasized that Colorado courts remain entirely open for adjudication of 42 U.S.C. § 1983 (2012) claims, including on an expedited basis if a preliminary injunction is sought, and therefore C.R.S. § 1-1-113 does not run afoul of the Supremacy Clause. To the extent that Brown v. Davidson, 192 P.3d 415 (Colo. App. 2006), holds to the contrary, it is overruled.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: § 1983 Claim May Not Be Brought in Colorado Election Code Proceeding

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Williams, Colorado Secretary of State v. Libertarian Party of Colorado on Monday, September 11, 2017.

Election Proceedings under C.R.S. § 1-1-113—42 U.S.C. § 1983—Supremacy Clause.

As held in Frazier v. Willaims, 2017 CO 85, ___ P.3d ___, a 42 U.S.C. § 1983 (2012) claim may not be brought in a proceeding under C.R.S. § 1-1-113.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.