December 11, 2017

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints New Member to Supreme Court Nominating Commission

On Wednesday, September 5, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Boards and Commissions appointments, including one to the Supreme Court Nominating Commission.

The Supreme Court Nominating Commission recommends candidates to serve as judges for the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. The chief justice of the Supreme Court chairs the commission and is a non-voting member. This commission includes one citizen admitted to practice law in Colorado and one citizen not admitted to practice law residing in each of the state’s seven congressional districts, and one additional citizen not admitted to practice law in Colorado.

Kim Brian Childs of Hotchkiss was appointed to serve as an attorney and as an Unaffiliated member from the Third Congressional District, with a term to expire December 31, 2017.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Series of Exchanged E-Mails Did Not Constitute “Meeting” for Purposes of Colorado’s Open Meetings Law

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Intermountain Rural Electric Association v. Colorado Public Utilities Commission on July 19, 2012.

Colorado Open Meetings Law—E-mail Exchanges—Summary Judgment.

This case raises the issue of whether e-mail exchanges among members of the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) regarding proposed legislation constituted “meetings” for purposes of the Colorado Open Meetings Law (OML). The Court of Appeals held that the exchanges did not constitute meetings and affirmed the trial court’s summary judgment in favor of defendants.

On March 15, 2010, a bill for the Clean Air–Clean Jobs Act (CACJA)was introduced in the House of Representatives. The next day, the director of the PUC provided testimony that the PUC did not oppose the legislation. Both Houses passed the bill and it was signed into law.

In early 2010, Kelly Nordini, a member of the Governor’s staff, e-mailed PUC Chairman Ron Binz seeking input on proposed language for inclusion in an earlier version of the bill. The language was suggested by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo). An e-mail conversation ensued among the Commissioners about the proposed legislation, and Nordini was copied on fifteen of eighteen e-mails. The content generally comprises edits to the draft legislative language and detailed discussion about the bill.

Intermountain Rural Electric Association (IREA) brought suit against the PUC, its Director, and the Commissioners in their official capacities, seeking a declaration that (1) the e-mails were “meetings” subject to the OML; (2) defendants violated the OML when they failed to provide notice of the meetings, make the meetings public, or enter an executive session; and (3) any formal action arising out of the e-mails was invalid.

Defendants moved for summary judgment, arguing the e-mails were not “meetings” under CRS § 24-6-402(1)(b). The trial court agreed and granted summary judgment in favor of defendants. On appeal, IREA argued it was error to determine the e-mails were not “convened to discuss public business.” The Court disagreed and affirmed.

The OML provides: “All meetings of two or more members of any state public body at which any public business is discussed or at which any formal action may be taken are declared to be public meetings open to the public at all times.” A “meeting” is “any kind of gathering, convened to discuss public business, in person, by telephone, electronically, or by other means of communication.” The parties agree that the exchange of e-mails was a “gathering” but dispute whether the e-mails discussed “public business.”

The Colorado Supreme Court has held that discussing public business (not defined in the statute) refers to a public body’s policy-making function. IREA claimed that the e-mails were part of the PUC’s policy-making process. The Court disagreed. It held that to prevail on an OML claim, a party must point to a pending action by the public body holding the meeting with regard to a rule, regulation, ordinance, or formal action by that public body that has a meaningful connection to the gathering in question. Here, the Court could not find that the hypothetical effect of providing input to the Governor’s staff with regard to draft language for a bill pending before the legislature, or advising a legislative committee that the PUC did not oppose the bill, constituted part of the PUC’s policy-making function.

The IREA argued that the e-mails were a “formal action” of the PUC because it is “authorized” to engage in discussions on pending legislative proposals. The Court stated that this argument failed to distinguish between “formal actions” of the PUC, which create public policy within the purview of the PUC’s policy-making powers, and other duties and actions of the PUC, which do not. Here, where the PUC was opining about potential legislation, it was not itself making public policy.

Summary and full case available here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Governor Had Right to Opt-Out of Physician Supervision Requirement for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Colorado Medical Society v. Hickenlooper, Governor of Colorado on July 19, 2012.

Dismissal for Failure to State a Claim—Social Security Act.

The Colorado Medical Society and Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists (collectively, Doctors) appealed the district court’s order dismissing their complaint for failure to state a claim against the Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper. The Colorado Association of Nurse Anesthetists, Colorado Nurses Association, and Colorado Hospital Association (collectively, Nurses) joined the Governor’s motion to dismiss. The order was affirmed.

Under the Social Security Act (Act), ambulatory surgical centers, hospitals, and critical access hospitals must fulfill certain conditions of participation to receive Medicare reimbursement. One condition is that certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) administering anesthesia must be supervised by a physician. However, states may opt out of the physician supervision requirement if “the State in which the [facility] is located submits a letter to [the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services] signed by the Governor, following consultation with the State’s Boards of Medicine and Nursing, requesting exemption from physician supervision of CRNAs.” The letter must attest that the Governor consulted the Boards and concluded the opt-out “is in the best interests of the State’s citizens” and “consistent with State law.”

Fifteen other states have opted out of physician supervision of nurses administering anesthesia. On July 19, 2010, former Governor Bill Ritter, Jr. requested advice from the Colorado Medical Board and the Colorado Board of Nursing about whether the opt-out was consistent with the law and in the best interests of Colorado’s citizens. In August, both recommended the opt-out. On September 27, 2010, Governor Ritter notified the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services about his consultation with the Boards and exercised the opt-out as to all critical access hospitals and thirteen rural general hospitals (later adding a fourteenth).

On September 28, 2010, the Doctors filed this action for declaratory relief, arguing the opt-out was inconsistent with Colorado law. The Nurses intervened and joined Governor Hickenlooper in a motion to dismiss. The district court granted the motion to dismiss, and the Doctors appealed.

The Court of Appeals first rejected an argument raised only by the Colorado Hospital Association: that the decision to opt out is “a decision committed to political branches and is not subject to judicial review.” The Court found no “textually demonstrable constitutional commitment” that expressly or impliedly vests the Governor with the sole discretion to determine whether CRNAs may administer anesthesia without physician supervision.

The Court rejected the Governor’s argument that the Doctors lacked standing to challenge the opt-out decision. The Court found the Doctors’ alleged injuries to their medical licenses and reputations sufficient to establish both tangible and intangible injuries concerning a legally protected interest (their medical licenses).

The Doctors argued it was error to dismiss their complaint, contending the Act requires physician supervision of CRNAs because (1) anesthesia is a medication; (2) medication is part of a medical plan; and (3) the administration of anesthesia is a “delegated medical function” subject to physician supervision. The Court disagreed, noting that the Act defines professional nursing as, in part, the performance of “delegated medical functions.” Such a function is defined, in part, as “an aspect of care that implements and is consistent with the medical plan as prescribed by a licensed or otherwise legally authorized physician.” Physician supervision is required when a nurse performs a delegated medical function. A CRNA, however, is an “advanced practice nurse,” which means a professional nurse “who obtains specialized education or training.”

The Court agreed with the district court that the Doctors’ argument cuts too broadly, because a CRNA never would administer any treatment unless implementing a medical plan. In addition, the Act’s definition of “practice of professional nursing” clearly recognizes many independent functions that are different from delegated medical functions. The Court concluded that CRNAs who administer anesthesia are conducting independent nursing functions within the scope, role, and population focus that the Nursing Board has approved for them. They are not conducting delegated medical functions and therefore do not require physician supervision. The order of dismissal was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here.

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints New Members to Two More Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Tuesday, July 3, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments, including appointments to the Thirteenth and Seventeenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The member appointed to the Thirteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • Jerold A. Brandt of Holyoke, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Phillips County.

The member appointed to the Seventeenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2015, is:

  • Angelo C. Chavez of Broomfield, to serve as a non attorney and as a Republican from Broomfield County.

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints New Members to Two Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, June 21, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments, including appointments to the Fourteenth and Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The member appointed to the Fourteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • David M. Jones of Kremmling, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Grand County.

The members appointed to the Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Douglas P. Erler of Greeley, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Weld County.
  • Joseph J. Tennessen of Greeley, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Weld County.

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints More to Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Tuesday, May 29, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments. The appointments were to the Second, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-First Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The members appointed to the Second Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Larry Allen Nelsen of Denver, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Denver County.
  • Andrew Dean Schneider of Denver, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Denver County.

The members appointed to the Fifth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Gregory V. Johnson of Edwards, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Eagle County.
  • Heather N. Scanlon of Leadville, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Lake County.

The member appointed to the Sixth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • Stephen C. Fearn of Silverton, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from San Juan County.

The member appointed to the Twelfth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • Marvin K. “Zeke” Ward of Creede, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mineral County.

The members appointed to the Twenty-First Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Ivan Daniel Geer of Grand Junction, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mesa County.
  • Beverly Jean Sewell of Grand Junction, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mesa County.

Several More Groups of Bills Signed Into Law by Governor Hickenlooper

As the legislature winds down, Governor Hickenlooper continues to sign bills into law. So far this legislative session, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 191 bills into law.

On Thursday, April 26, the governor signed ten bills into law. Four of those are summarized here.

  • HB 12-1236Concerning the Regulation of Charitable Solicitations, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation
    Sponsored by Rep. Ken Summers and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill makes several changes to the regulation of charitable solicitations.
  • HB 12-1126 Concerning On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems
    Sponsored by Rep. Cheri Gerou. The bill updates statutes related to the regulation of on-site wastewater treatment systems.
  • HB 12-1313 Concerning Procedures Related to the Statewide Initiative Title Board
    Sponsored by Rep. Libby Szabo and Sen. Bob Bacon. The bill makes several changes to the procedures of the statewide initiative Title Board.
  • HB 12-1209 Concerning the “Uniform Electronic Legal Material Act”
    Sponsored by Rep. Bob Gardner and Sen. Morgan Carroll. The bill establishes procedures for the publication and authentication of certain legal material, including the Colorado Revised Statutes, session laws, constitution, and Code of Colorado Regulations.

Governor Hickenlooper signed 19 bills into law on Thursday, May 3, 2012, including several from the Joint Budget Committee. Four of the bills signed on May 3 are summarized here.

  • HB 12-1258Concerning Regulation of Public Utilities in Terms of Alternative Fuel Vehicles
    Sponsored by Rep. Brian DelGrosso and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill requires public utilities to make reasonable efforts to provide service connection for fueling of alternative fuel vehicles.
  • SB 12-158Concerning the Consolidation of Two Public Housing Agencies Within the Division of Housing in the Department of Local Affairs
    Sponsored by Sen. Betty Boyd and Rep. Laura Bradford. The bill clarifies that the Division of Housing is the sole public housing authority for providing financial housing assistance, and shifts the Homeless Prevention Activities Program to the Division of Housing.
  • HB 12-1340Concerning a Reduction in the General Fund Portion of the Per Diem Rates Paid to Nursing Facilities, and, In Connection Therewith, Reducing an Appropriation
    Sponsored by Rep. Jon Becker and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill reduces the per diem rates paid to skilled nursing facilities by 1.5 for Fiscal Year 2012-13 only.
  • SB 12-110Concerning a Fund Consisting of Surcharges on Insurance Premiums to Pay for Costs Associated with Criminal Prosecution of Insurance Fraud Investigations, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation
    Sponsored by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Claire Levy. The bill changes the amount of fees paid to the state by insurance companies to a two-tier schedule set by the Commissioner of Insurance.

On Monday, May 7, Governor Hickenlooper signed the budget bill for the next fiscal year. The bill was approved by an overwhelming majority of legislators – it received 86 yes votes and only 8 no votes. Governor Hickenlooper lauded the legislature for approving the bill with such an impressive majority. The “long bill,” HB 12-1335, contains separate links to the budgets for all state agencies, including add-ons for some agencies.

Governor Hickenlooper signed seven more bills into law on Wednesday, May 9, 2012. Three of them are summarized here.

  • SB 12-012Concerning the Department of Revenue’s Audits of Automobile Emissions Inspection Facilities
    Sponsored by Sen. Steve King and Rep. Joe Miklosi. The bill decreases the frequency of overt audits of vehicle emission inspection facilities and increases the frequency of covert audits.
  • SB 12-060Concerning Improving Medicaid Fraud Prosecution
    Sponsored by Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill requries reporting by certain state agencies for the legislature’s use the following year in order to evaluate Medicaid fraud.
  • HB 12-1262Concerning Enactment of Amendments to the Secured Transactions Provisions of the “Uniform Commercial Code”
    Sponsored by Rep. Bob Gardner and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill adopts changes to the Uniform Commercial Code as recommended by the Colorado Commission on Uniform Laws.

A complete list of legislation signed by Governor Hickenlooper in 2012 is available here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Another Judicial Nominating Commission Appointment

On Friday, April 27, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments, including one more appointment to a Judicial Nominating Commission:

The Eleventh Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission selects nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. The commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission and consists of seven citizens residing in that judicial district. The member appointed for a term expiring December 31, 2017 is:

  • Mark Willis Pedigo of Westcliffe, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Custer County.

Governor Hickenlooper Signs Several Groups of Bills Into Law

Governor Hickenlooper has continued to sign legislation into law over the past several days and weeks. He has signed 155 bills into law so far this legislative session.

Fourteen bills were signed on Friday, April 13, 2012. Five of them are highlighted below:

  • HB 12-1323: Concerning the Associate County Judge for Montrose County.
    Sponsored by Rep. Don Coram and Sen. Ellen Roberts. This bill changes the residency requirements for the associate county judge for Montrose County. The judge must now reside within Montrose County and maintain chambers within the boundaries of the Southwestern Water Conservation District.
  • SB 12-022: Concerning Maintaining Child Care Assistance for Working Families.
    Sponsored by Sen. Suzanne Williams and Rep. Tom Massey. The bill creates a pilot program in the Department of Human Services to allow a county to continue providing public benefits to a family that has recently exceeded the income limits for the program and requires the family to pay an increasing portion of the costs for the program.
  • SB 12-092: Concerning the Use of a Video Display in a Motor Vehicle That is Being Operated on a Roadway.
    Sponsored by Sen. Cheri Jahn and Rep. Larry Liston. The bill allows the use of video displays anywhere in a moving vehicle as long as the display is not visible to the driver.
  • SB 12-095: Concerning Requirements for the Valid Transfer of Title to a Motor Vehicle.
    Sponsored by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Mark Barker. The bill clarifies that title applicants possessing a notarized bill of sale (within two years) and a certified vehicle identification number inspection document may obtain title, regardless of the age of the vehicle.
  • SB 12-131: Concerning the Responsibilities of a Fiduciary with Regard to the Estate of a Person Who May Have Executed a Designated Beneficiary Agreement.
    Sponsored by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill relieves the Personal Representative (PR) of an estate from liability for distributing the estate contrary to the wishes of the decedent regarding an executed Designated Beneficiary Agreement (DBA), if the PR had no actual knowledge of the executed DBA after searching every county in which the PR knew the decedent lived for the three years prior to death.

Governor Hickenlooper signed eight bills on Monday, April 16, 2012. Three of them are highlighted below.

  • SB 12-057: Concerning Native American Language Instruction.
    Sponsored by Sen. Suzanne Williams and Rep. J. Paul Brown. The bill allows certified instructors to teach Native American language and culture in schools, as long as the instructor is certified in the language he or she is teaching.
  • SB 12-091: Concerning Modifications to Provisions Governing the Practice of Nursing Home Administration, and, in Connection Therewith, Modifying the Criteria for Nursing Home Administrators to Qualify to Serve on the Board of Examiners of Nursing Home Administratore, Modifying the Experience Requirements for Persons Applying to Take the Nursing Home Administrator Licensure Examination or to Participate in the Administrator-in-Training Program, and Permitting a Nursing Home Administrator who has Passed a National Examination and an Examination in Another State to Sit for the Colorado Licensure Examination.
    Sponsored by Sen. Lois Tochtrop and Rep. Laura Bradford. The bill makes changes to the Board of Examiners of Nursing Home Administrators and the licensing process for Nursing Home Administrators.
  • HB 12-1009: Concerning a Report Related to the Federal Moneys Received By the Executive Branch.
    Sponsored by Rep. Cheri Gerou and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill requires certain information to be added to the annual Report of Federal Assistance for all state agencies in order to increase transparency in government.

On Wednesday, April 18, 2012, the Governor journeyed to the newly renamed Metropolitan State University of Denver in order to ceremoniously sign two bills into law, both of which are highlighted below.

  • SB 12-045: Concerning Granting Associate Degrees to Students who Transfer from a Two-Year Institution.
    Sponsored by Sens. Evie Hudak and Keith King and Reps. Tom Massey and Rhonda Fields. The bill specifies that students who meet certain requirements may be eligible for associate degrees from two-year institutions.
  • SB 12-148: Concerning Changing the Name of Metropolitan State College of Denver to Metropolitan State University of Denver.
    Sponsored by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Crisanta Duran. The bill changes the name of Metropolitan State College of Denver to Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Governor Hickenlooper also ceremoniously signed a bill in Colorado Springs on Thursday, April 19, 2012 at the Colorado Space Industry Luncheon. The bill is summarized here.

  • SB 12-035: Concerning Limited Liability for Spaceflight Activities.
    Sponsored by Sen. Mary Hodge and Rep. Bob Gardner. The bill creates a statutory limitation of liability for FAA-licensed entities who conduct spaceflight activities.

On Friday, April 20, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper signed two bills relating to direct filing (charging juveniles as adults for criminal acts) and electronic recycling. These two bills are summarized below.

  • HB 12-1271: Concerning Charging Juveniles by Direct File of Information or Indictment in District Court.
    Sponsored by Reps. B.J. Nikkel and Beth McCann and Sens. Angela Giron and Tim Neville. The bill raises the minimum age for direct filing from 14 to 16, and limits the offenses for which a juvenile may be tried as an adult.
  • SB 12-133: Concerning the Diversion of Electronic Devices from Landfills.
    Sponsored by Sen. Gail Schwartz and Rep. Don Coram. The bill prohibits landfill disposal for certain electronic devices, excepting residents of counties that do not have at least two electronic waste recycling events per year.

Finally, on Monday, April 23, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper signed three more bills into law, which are summarized below.

  • HB 12-1228: Concerning Criminal Background Checks for Neighborhood Youth Organizations Seeking to Obtain a License.
    Sponsored by Rep. Brian DelGrosso and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill changes the requirements for background checks for employees and volunteers of a neighborhood youth organization, but continues to mandate that any person found to have been convicted of felony child abuse or any felony involving unlawful sexual behavior be prohibited from working at a neighborhood youth organization.
  • HB 12-1318: Concerning the Development of Guidelines Regarding the Eligibility of Controlled Maintenance Funding for State Facilities.
    Sponsored by Rep. J. Paul Brown and Sen. Gail Schwartz. The bill codifies existing practice regarding controlled maintenance funding.
  • SB 12-067: Concerning Requirements Pertaining to the Corporate Status of Charter Schools.
    Sponsored by Sen. Evie Hudak and Rep. Chris Holbert. The bill requires that all Colorado charter schools be organized as nonprofit corporations and prohibits a board of a charter school from authorizing a charter with a for-profit entity.
  • SB 12-127: Concerning the Participation of Providers of Long-Term Care in Medicaid Care Coordination Programs.
    Sponsored by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Ken Summers. The bill requires the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to allow long-term care providers to participate if it develops a program of health homes for persons with chronic conditions.

A complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2012 legislative decisions is available here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces More Judicial Nominating Commission Appointments

On Tuesday, April 24, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments, including a few more appointments to Judicial Nominating Commissions around the state:

The Third Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission selects nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. The commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission and consists of seven citizens residing in that judicial district. The members appointed for terms expiring December 31, 2017:

  • James S. Colt of Trinidad, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican member from Las Animas County.
  • Raymond M. McMillan of Trinidad, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat member from Las Animas County.
  • Sisto J. Mazza of Trinidad, to serve as an attorney and as a Democrat member from Las Animas County.

The Supreme Court Judicial Nominating Commission recommends candidates to serve as judges for the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals. The chief justice of the Supreme Court chairs the commission and is a non-voting member. The member appointed for a term expiring December 31, 2017:

  • Scott C. Johnson of Greeley, to serve as an attorney and as an Unaffiliated member from the Fourth Congressional District.

HB 12-1335: House Long Appropriations Bill

On April 4, 2012, Rep. Cheri Gerou and Sen. Mary Hodge introduced HB 12-1335 – Long Appropriations Bill. This summary is published here courtesy of the Colorado Bar Association’s e-Legislative Report.

Provides for the payment of expenses of the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial departments of the state of Colorado, and of its agencies and institutions, for and during the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2012, except as otherwise noted. The bill passed the House on April 12 and is assigned to the Appropriations Committee in the Senate. The Appropriations Committee will review the bill on Tuesday, April 17 at 7:30 a.m.

Since this summary, the bill was amended in the Appropriations Committee and referred to the House Committee of the Whole.

Summaries of other featured bills can be found here.

HB 12-1320: Repeal of Governor’s Energy Office Program and Diversion of Funds to Low-Income Energy Assistance in DHS

On March 2, 2012, Rep. Cindy Acree introduced HB 12-1320 – Concerning Energy-Related Assistance to Low-Income Households. This summary is published here courtesy of the Colorado Bar Association’s e-Legislative Report.

The bill repeals the governor’s energy office’s program for providing home energy efficiency improvements for low-income households. The bill also redirects money to the department of human services low-income energy assistance fund for the purpose of increasing available funding under the low-income energy assistance program from:

  • Money currently allocated to the governor’s energy office for the office’s home energy efficiency improvements program; and
  • Money currently allocated to the energy outreach Colorado low-income energy assistance fund used by energy outreach Colorado to provide direct bill payment assistance to low-income households when the department of human services is not accepting client applications for the low-income energy assistance program.

The bill has been assigned to the Agriculture, Livestock, & Natural Resources Committee.

Summaries of other featured bills can be found here.