August 28, 2015

Colorado Court of Appeals: Consecutive Sentences May Constitute De Facto Life Sentence for Juvenile Offender

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Ellis on Thursday, August 13, 2015.

Juvenile—Murder—Life Sentence—Eighth Amendment—Possibility of Parole—Life Expectancy—Direct Transfer Hearing—Jury Selection—Batson Challenge.

Ellis was 17 years old when he shot and killed C.H. and wounded N.A. from the backseat of his friend’s car. Defendant was found guilty of the charges against him for these crimes. He was sentenced to life with the possibility of parole after forty years on the first-degree murder conviction and a thirty-two-year consecutive sentence for the attempted first-degree murder–extreme indifference conviction.

On appeal, Ellis contended that his sentence to life with the possibility of parole after a minimum of forty years’ imprisonment, together with his mandatory consecutive term of thirty-two years imprisonment, is the equivalent of life without the possibility of parole and, therefore, unconstitutional. The Eighth Amendment prohibits mandatory life sentences without the possibility of parole for juveniles convicted of homicide. Ellis’s sentence would constitute a de facto life sentence without the possibility of parole, and therefore would be unconstitutional, if it left Ellis without a meaningful opportunity for release. However, because Ellis’s contention depended on a factual determination of his life expectancy, which the trial court did not previously conduct, the case was remanded to the trial court to make this determination.

Ellis contended that the trial court erred when it denied his request for a direct transfer hearing. CRS § 19-2-517(1)(a)(I) permits prosecutors to charge juveniles 16 years old or older as adults, without a transfer hearing, if their charges include a class 1 or 2 felony. The reenacted statute included a provision allowing juveniles charged by direct filing to file a motion with the district court seeking transfer to juvenile court. However, the reenacted statute became effective three days after a jury convicted Ellis. Therefore, the trial court did not err when it denied Ellis’s reverse transfer motion as untimely.

Ellis also contended that the trial court abused its discretion when it denied his Batson challenge to the prosecution’s use of peremptory challenges to excuse two potential jurors on account of their race. The prosecution provided a race-neutral explanation, the court found the prosecutor’s reasons believable, and the trial court’s ruling is supported by the record. Therefore, the trial court did not clearly err when it denied Ellis’s Batson challenges.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Forms to Seal Minor In Possession Cases, Relinquish Parental Rights, and More Amended

The Colorado State Judicial Branch released several amended forms in July and August, 2015. The amended forms were in the categories of adoption, DMV appeals, protection orders, relinquishing parental rights, and sealing cases. The forms are available here in PDF format and are available for download as Word documents from the State Judicial website.

ADOPTION

  • JDF 345 – “Order for Appointment of Confidential Intermediary” (revised 8/15)

DMV APPEAL

  • JDF 599 – “Complaint for Judicial Review of Denial, Cancellation, Suspension, or Revocation of a Driver’s License or Identification Card” (revised 8/15)

PROTECTION ORDERS

  • JDF 440 – “Mandatory Protection Order” (revised 7/15)

RELINQUISH PARENTAL RIGHTS

  • JDF 512 – “Relinquishment Interrogatory – Father” (revised 8/15)

SEAL MY CASE

  • JDF 305 – “Petition for Expungement of UDD” (revised 8/15)
  • JDF 313 – “Petition to Seal Records Related to Illegal Possession or Consumption of Ethyl Alcohol or Marijuana by an Underage Person (MIP)” (revised 7/15)
  • JDF 314 – “Order Regarding the Sealing of Records Related to Illegal Possession or Consumption of Ethyl Alcohol or Marijuana by an Underage Person (MIP)” (revised 7/15)
  • JDF 323 – “Instructions to File a Petition to Seal Records Related to Illegal Possession or Consumption of Ethyl Alcohol or Marijuana by an Underage Person (MIP)” (revised 7/15)

Click here for all of State Judicial’s JDF forms.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Dependency and Neglect Action Not Moot When Collateral Consequences Probable

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of C.G. on Thursday, July 30, 2015.

Dependency and Neglect—Mootness Following Child’s Death—CRCP 60(b) Motion.

In March 2006, the Jefferson County Division of Children, Youth, and Families (Division) filed a dependency and neglect petition and assumed temporary custody of a 5-year-old child and his younger half-sibling. The petition asserted that father (“whereabouts unknown”) had abandoned him. Publication notice was completed.

In May 2006, the court placed the child in the temporary custody of Phillips, the father of the child’s half-sibling. In November 2006, the court adjudicated the child dependent and neglected by default as to father and granted an allocation of parental responsibilities (APR) for the child to Phillips. The child died a year later. Phillips was convicted of first-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.

Several years later, father, the child’s mother, and the personal representative of the child’s estate commenced a federal court action against the Division, the Denver County Department of Human Services (Department), and two caseworkers from the Department. The claims were 42 USC §1983 claims for violations of the child’s substantive due process rights.

In June 2014, father moved for CRCP 60(b) relief in the dependency and neglect proceeding. He sought to vacate the trial court’s orders because the Division had failed to exercise due diligence to ascertain his identity before serving him by publication. The Division responded that the matter was moot, and father answered that it would have a practical effect on the §1983 action. The court denied father’s motion as moot without holding a hearing.

The Court of Appeals concluded that the request for relief was not moot because of the collateral consequence of the dependency and neglect orders in father’s federal action. The Court noted that an issue is not moot when the judgment may result in significant collateral consequences to a party. This decision turns on showing the reasonable possibility of such consequences. Here, the orders in the dependency and neglect proceeding were being used to impose a collateral consequence on father—the denial of relief in his federal action. If the child was not in the state’s custody after transferring custody and awarding APR to Phillips, then father’s only surviving claims in the federal action (against the caseworkers) would be dismissed. If, however, his CRCP 60(b) relief was granted, there would be a reasonable possibility that he could pursue his remaining claims in federal court.

Even if father’s motion were moot, the district court should have considered its merits because its substantive issues fell within the exceptions to the mootness doctrine. The order was reversed and the matter was remanded for consideration of the merits of the CRCP 60(b) motion.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: ADA Not Defense to Termination of Parental Rights

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of C.Z. on Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Dependency and Neglect—Termination of Parent–Child Legal Relationship—Americans with Disabilities Act.

The Weld County Department of Human Services (Department) filed a dependency and neglect petition after mother was unwilling to follow through with treatment to address her multiple mental health diagnoses. The Department also asserted father had been diagnosed with severe depression. The court granted the Department custody of the child.

The court then adjudicated the child dependent and neglected and approved a treatment plan for the parents. After receiving the psychological and parent–child interactional evaluations, the Department moved to terminate the parents’ parental rights, asserting that no appropriate treatment plan could be devised to address their unfitness. Following a contested hearing, the court terminated the parent–child legal relationship.

On appeal, mother and father argued that CRS § 19-3-604(1)(b)(I) conflicts with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) because it allows the court to terminate parental rights of disabled parents without requiring the Department to provide them the rehabilitative services that other parents receive. The Court first addressed the Department’s assertion that the parents’ contention should be summarily rejected because the ADA is not a defense to termination of parental rights. Title II of the ADA does not limit the court’s authority to terminate a disabled parent’s rights when the parent is unable to meet his or her child’s needs. However, it does apply to the provision of assessments, treatment, and other services that a department provides to parents through a dependency and neglect proceeding before a termination hearing. Accordingly, the issue in this case is whether CRS § 19-3-604(1)(b)(I) is preempted by the ADA.

The type of preemption at issue here was conflict preemption, which voids a state statute that conflicts with a valid federal law. A conflict is found when compliance with both federal and state regulations is a physical impossibility or when the state law stands as an obstacle to the accomplishment and full execution of the purposes and objectives of federal law.

CRS § 19-3-604(1)(b)(I) permits termination of parental rights of mentally impaired parents without requiring the Department to provide them treatment plans. However, the Court held this does not conflict with the ADA’s requirement that a public entity make reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with disabilities. If rehabilitative services can be offered to address a parent’s mental impairment so that he or she can meet the child’s needs within a reasonable time, then termination is not authorized under CRS § 19-3-604(1)(b)(I). A finding that no treatment plan can be devised to address a parent’s unfitness caused by mental impairment is the equivalent of a determination that no reasonable accommodations can be made to account for the parent’s disability under the ADA.

In determining whether reasonable accommodations can be made to address the parent’s disability under the ADA, the court’s paramount concern is the child’s health and safety. The ADA does not protect an individual who poses a safety risk to others. The Court concluded that the trial court’s findings here satisfy the ADA requirement that no reasonable accommodations could be made to enable mother and father to participate in an appropriate treatment plan and rehabilitative services.

Father also argued the termination of his parental rights solely on the basis of his mental disability violated his right to equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment. The Court disagreed. Parents who are unable to meet their children’s needs within a reasonable time, whether because of mental impairment or another statutorily enumerated reason, are not similarly situated to parents who have the ability to become fit within a reasonable time. The judgment was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Bond Condition Does Not Impermissibly Impair Defendant’s Right to Parent his Children

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Fallis on Thursday, June 4, 2015.

Bond Conditions—Right to Parent.

A Weld County grand jury indicted petitioner for second-degree murder of his wife. The trial court released petitioner on bond. One of the bond conditions was that petitioner remain in Colorado during the pendency of this criminal case. Petitioner filed a motion to reconsider the bond condition, which was denied.

On appeal, petitioner argued that the trial court transgressed on his presumption of innocence in setting the bond condition and unconstitutionally interfered with his right to parent his children, who reside in Indiana. The court did not treat petitioner as guilty of the charged offense; instead, the court properly considered the nature of the charged offense and the penalty that would be imposed if he was found guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Further, the court did not limit petitioner’s right to parent his children. Any such restrictions arise from circumstances outside the trial court’s control: petitioner’s decision to move himself and his children to Indiana after his wife’s death, and the temporary decision of an Indiana court prohibiting the children from being removed from Indiana. Accordingly, the court did not abuse its discretion in imposing the bond condition. The petition for review of the bail order was dismissed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Final Bills of 2015 Legislative Session Signed; Three Sent to Secretary of State Without Signature

CapitolbuildingOn Friday, June 5, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed 60 bills into law and allowed three bills to become law without a signature. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 362 bills into law, vetoed three bills, and allowed three to become law without a signature. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 15-011 – Concerning the Pilot Program for Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries Relating to the Use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill continues the Medicaid Spinal Cord Injury Alternative Medicine Pilot Program and expands the program so it can serve additional clients.
  • SB 15-090Concerning the Adoption of Standards Governing Temporary Permits on Motor Vehicles for Effective Readability, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Max Tyler. The bill requires that temporary motor vehicle plates meet the same requirements regarding readability as permanent plates.
  • HB 15-1310 – Concerning the Authority of the Division of Parks and Wildlife to Acquire Real Property for their Garfield County Administrative Office and Public Service Center, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill allows the Division of Parks and Wildlife to purchase a specific property in Garfield County.
  • HB 15-1318 – Concerning the Requirements for Administering a Single Medicaid Waiver for Home- and Community-Based Services for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill requires the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to consolidate two waiver programs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • HB 15-1252 – Concerning an Extension of the Number of Years the Individual Income Tax Return Includes a Voluntary Contribution Designation for the Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund, by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill extends the voluntary check-box contribution for the Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund until 2020.
  • HB 15-1166 – Concerning the Creation of a Tributary Groundwater Monitoring Network in the South Platte River Alluvial Aquifer, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Lori Saine & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill creates a basin-wide tributary groundwater monitoring network in the South Platte River alluvial aquifer based on recommendations from a CWCB report.
  • HB 15-1283 – Concerning Marijuana Testing, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating a Reference Lab by December 31, 2015, that will House a Library of Testing Methodologies and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill requires the Department of Public Health and Environment to develop and maintain a marijuana laboratory testing reference library.
  • HB 15-1368 – Concerning the Creation of a Cross-System Response for Behavioral Health Crises Pilot Program to Serve Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill creates a pilot program to support collaborative approaches for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities and a mental health or behavioral disorder.
  • HB 15-1247 – Concerning the Implementation of the Legislative Audit Committee’s Recommendations for Review of Dam Safety, by Rep. Lori Saine and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill increases the fees charged by the State Engineer for dam project design review.
  • HB 15-1248 – Concerning Limited Access by Private Child Placement Agencies to Records Relating to Child Abuse or Neglect for Purposes of Ensuring Safe Placements for Foster Children, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill permits one representative at each child placement agency to review records of potential foster parents for reports of abuse or neglect.
  • HB 15-1355 – Concerning Access to Personal Records Relating to a Person’s Family History, by Reps. Lori Saine & Jonathan Singer and Sens. Vicki Marble & Linda Newell. The bill allows an adult adoptee to access his or her birth certificate and that of his or her adult sibling in Colorado.
  • HB 15-1357 – Concerning the Establishment of the Ratio of Valuation for Assessment of Residential Real Property, by Reps. Lois Court & Brian DelGrosso and Sens. Tim Neville & Michael Johnston. The bill establishes the residential assessment rate for 2015-2016 and does not change it.
  • SB 15-020 – Concerning Education Regarding the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Assault, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Beth McCann. The bill expands the duties of the School Safety Resource Center to include providing education and materials regarding awareness and prevention of child sexual assault.
  • SB 15-109 – Concerning the Mandatory Reporting of Mistreatment Against an Adult with a Disability, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dave Young. The bill expands the at-risk adult reporting requirements to include adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • SB 15-195 – Concerning Appropriating to the Department of Corrections Moneys Generated as Savings from the Awarding of Achievement Earned Time to Inmates, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill limits the amount of earned time savings that may be used toward education and parole programs.
  • SB 15-196 – Concerning Measures to Ensure Industrial Hemp Remains Below a Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol Concentration of No More than Three-Tenths of One Percent on a Dry Weight Basis, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Vicki Marble & Pat Steadman and Reps. Steve Lebsock & Lois Saine. The bill expands the industrial hemp committee and imposes new regulations on industrial hemp.
  • SB 15-220 – Concerning Security for the Colorado General Assembly, by Sens. Morgan Carroll & Bill Cadman and Reps. Crisanta Duran & Brian DelGrosso. The bill requires the Colorado State Patrol to provide protection for the members of the General Assembly.
  • SB 15-256 – Concerning the Operation of the Legislative Committee that Oversees the Colorado Health Benefit Exchange, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. Beth McCann. The bill makes several changes to the Colorado health benefit exchange committee’s duties.
  • SB 15-115 – Concerning the Sunset Review of the Medical Marijuana Programs, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Ellen Roberts. The bill continues the Medical Marijuana Code until 2019 and implements some changes to the program.
  • HB 15-1063 – Concerning Prohibited Communication Concerning Patents, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dan Pabon and Sen. David Balmer. The bill establishes a framework for communications between parties regarding patent rights.
  • HB 15-1178 – Concerning the State Engineer’s Authority to Allow Well Users to Lower the Water Table in an Area that the State Engineer Determines is Experiencing Damaging High Groundwater Levels, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing an Emergency Dewatering Grant Program for the Purpose of Lowering the Water Table in Areas of Gilcrest, Colorado, and Sterling, Colorado and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Lori Saine & Stephen Humphrey and Sens. Vicki Marble & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill establishes the Emergency Dewatering Grant Program for the emergency pumping of wells.
  • HB 15-1102 – Concerning the Expansion of the “Colorado Cottage Foods Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Food Products a Producer Can Sell Under the Act, Requiring an Additional Disclaimer, and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Millie Hamner & Yeulin Willett and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Kevin Grantham. The bill divides the foods that can be produced under the Cottage Foods Act into two tiers.
  • SB 15-012 – Concerning the Treatment of Child Support for Purposes of the Colorado Works Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. John Kefalas and Rep. Brittany Pettersen. The bill allows the Department of Human Services to disregard child support income when determining eligibility for the TANF program.
  • HB 15-1219 – Concerning the Enterprise Zone Investment Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Products, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Beth McCann & Jon Becker and Sens. Mary Hodge & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill allows a taxpayer who places a renewable energy product in an enterprise zone to receive a refund of the tax credit.
  • HB 15-1228 – Concerning the Special Fuel Excise Tax on Liquefied Petroleum Gas, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Diane Mitsch Bush & Jon Becker and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill makes several changes to the administration and collection of the special fuel excise tax program for liquefied petroleum.
  • HB 15-1350 – Concerning Performance Measures for Accrediting an Alternative Education Campus, by Rep. Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill requires the Department of Education to convene stakeholder meetings to review statutes and rules related to performance indicators for the accreditation of alternative education campuses.
  • HB 15-1392 – Concerning Changes to the State’s Payroll System to Allow All State Employees to be Paid Twice a Month, by Reps. Dave Young & Jack Tate and Sens. Linda Newell & Tim Neville. The bill changes the pay schedule for all state employees to twice a month.
  • HB 15-1352 – Concerning Modifications to the Naturopathic Formulary of Medications that a Registered Naturopathic Doctor is Authorized to Use in the Practice of Naturopathic Medicine, by Reps. Joann Ginal & Kathleen Conti and Sens. Larry Crowder & Linda Newell. The bill expands the authority of naturopathic doctors in several ways.
  • HB 15-1353 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Conveyances, and, in Connection Therewith, Extending the Certification of Conveyances and Conveyance Mechanics, Contractors, and Inspectors of Elevators and Escalators Until July 1, 2022, by Rep. Alec Garnett and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill extends the Elevator and Escalator Certification Act to regulate conveyances.
  • HB 15-1360 – Concerning the Use of Injection Therapy by Acupuncturists Licensed Pursuant to Article 29.5 of Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, by Rep. Joann Ginal and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill allows licensed acupuncturists to practice injection therapy.
  • HB 15-1083 – Concerning Patient Financial Contributions for Physical Rehabilitation Services, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires the Colorado Commission on Affordable Health Care to conduct a study of the costs of physical rehabilitation services.
  • HB 15-1261 – Concerning the Maximum Reserve for a Cash Fund with Fee Revenue, by Rep. Dave Young and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Pat Steadman. The bill alters the cash fund reserve requirement.
  • HB 15-1273 – Concerning Additional Comprehensive Reporting Requirements for School Discipline Reports, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring a Post-Enactment Review of the Implementation of this Act and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Polly Lawrence and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill adds sexual assaults and marijuana violations to the list of items that must be included in a safe schools report.
  • HB 15-1370 – Concerning Access to Certain Records of a County Department of Human or Social Services Containing Personal Identifying Information by an Auditor Conducting a Financial or Performance Audit of that Department, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Tim Neville. The bill permits an auditor access to all files of a county department of human or social services that are needed to conduct the audit.
  • SB 15-029 – Concerning a Study of Volunteer Firefighter Pension Plans in the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Jessie Ulibarri and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill requires the state auditor to conduct a study of firefighter pension plans in Colorado.
  • SB 15-184 – Concerning Enforcement of Compulsory Education Requirements, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Rhonda Fields. The bill requires the chief judge in each judicial district to convene a meeting of stakeholders to find ways to address truancy other than detention.
  • SB 15-203 – Concerning Continuation of the Regulation of Debt-Management Service Providers by the Attorney General, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill continues the Uniform Debt-Management Services Act.
  • SB 15-228 – Concerning a Process for the Periodic Review of Provider Rates Under the “Colorado Medical Assistance Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill establishes a process for the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to review Medicare provider rates.
  • SB 15-261 – Concerning a Modification to the Statute that Specifies the Forms of Public Notice that a Public Utility May Provide Regarding a Change in the Public Utility’s Schedule of Charges to Allow a Request for an Alternative Form of Notice within the Same Formal Application that the Public Utility Files with the Public Utilities Commission When Applying for a Change in the Public Utility’s Schedule of Charges, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Dave Young. The bill allows public utilities to request rate changes during existing proceedings.
  • HB 15-1282 – Concerning the Creation of Crimes Involving Deception about Material Information in Connection with Birth Certificates, by Rep. Lois Saine and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill creates a class 2 misdemeanor for anyone who intentionally omits material information in the preparation of a birth certificate.
  • HB 15-1309 – Concerning the Placement of Interim Therapeutic Restorations by Dental Hygienists, and, in Connection Therewith, Ensuring Medicaid and Children’s Basic Health Plan Reimbursement for Services Provided Through the Use of Telehealth Related to Interim Therapeutic Restoration Procedures and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Joann Ginal and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill allows dental hygienists to perform therapeutic restorations.
  • HB 15-1333 – Concerning the Creation of a Regional Center Depreciation Account in the Capital Construction Fund for Maintenance of the State’s Regional Centers, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill creates the Regional Center Depreciation Account to hold moneys for depreciation and capital construction.
  • HB 15-1337 – Concerning Placement Stability for Children, by Rep. Angela Williams and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill requires a court to consider all statutory factors when placing a child for foster care.
  • HB 15-1340 – Concerning an Extension of the Period During Which the Voluntary Contribution Designation Benefiting the Colorado Multiple Sclerosis Fund will Appear on the State Individual Income Tax Return Form, by Reps. Faith Winter & Perry Buck and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Linda Newell. The bill extends the Colorado Multiple Sclerosis Fund check-off through 2021.
  • HB 15-1345 – Concerning an Exemption from Certain Traffic Requirements for the Riders of a Three-Wheel Low-Speed Motorcycle, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill exempts motorcyclists who ride low-speed three-wheeled motorcycles from requirements of licensure and eye protection.
  • HB 15-1366 – Concerning the Expansion of the Colorado Job Growth Incentive Tax Credit to Allow Credits for Businesses that Enter Into a Qualified Partnership with a State Institution of Higher Education, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Yeulin Willett and Sen. David Balmer. The bill allows the job growth incentive tax credit to be refundable under certain conditions.
  • HB 15-1387 – Concerning the Elimination of the Authorized Transfer of Medical Marijuana to Retail Marijuana at the Time that a Retail Marijuana Establishment License Becomes Effective, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Bob Rankin and Sens. Pat Steadman & Kent Lambert. The bill prohibits a medical marijuana facility with a retail marijuana license from transferring any of its medical marijuana to the retail establishment.
  • SB 15-192 – Concerning the Provision of a Therapeutic Alternative Drug Selection to Patients Residing in Certain Long-Term Care Facilities, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Janak Joshi. The bill allows licensed pharmacists to provide therapeutic alternate drug selections to patients in nursing care facilities and long-term acute care hospitals if certain conditions are met.
  • SB 15-209 – Concerning an Amendment to Specified Statutes Governing the Management of the Financial Affairs of a Unit Owners’ Association Under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” so as to Exempt Communities in Which a Majority of Units Designated for Residential Use are Time Share Units, by Sen. David Balmer and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill exempts certain timeshare communities from the definitions of “common interest community” and “homeowners’ association.”
  • SB 15-210Concerning Creation of the Title Insurance Commission, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill creates the Title Insurance Commission to serve as an advisory body to the Commissioner of Insurance.
  • SB 15-229 – Concerning the Creation of an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis License Plate for Motor Vehicles, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Reps. Janak Joshi & Diane Mitsch Bush. The bill creates an ALS license plate, available when the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the ALS Association receives 3,000 signatures of individuals committed to purchase the plate.
  • SB 15-262 – Concerning Updates to the Statutes Regulating Blanket Sickness and Accident Insurance, by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill expands and clarifies the groups that may receive blanket accident and sickness insurance.
  • SB 15-267 – Concerning the Financing of Public Schools, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill increases per-pupil funding for public schools to reflect inflation.
  • SB 15-270 – Concerning the Creation of the Office of the State Architect, and, in Connection Therewith, Adding Statewide Planning Responsibilities and Making and Reducing an Appropriation, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill creates the Office of the State Architect in law.
  • SB 15-271 – Concerning the Continuation of the Entities Charged with Representing the Interests of Certain Utility Consumers in Matters Heard by the Public Utilities Commission, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Jon Becker. The bill continues the Office of the Consumer Counsel and implements recommendations from the sunset review.
  • SB 15-278 – Concerning an Amendment to the Annual General Appropriation Act for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year to Allow Unspent Moneys Appropriated for the Colorado State Capitol Dome Restoration Project to be Used for the Next Planned Phase of the Colorado State Capitol Restoration, by Sens. Kent Lambert & Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill allows the Department of Personnel and Administration to use moneys from the capitol restoration project on other projects.
  • SB 15-281 – Concerning Parent Engagement in Institute Charter Schools, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill requires charter schools, rather than the Charter School Institute, to hold meetings regarding school priority implementation.
  • SB 15-283 – Concerning Debt Collection Proceedings, and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Scope and Value of Assets that may be Exempted, Clarifying Definitions of “Earnings”, and Specifying the Procedure for Service of Notice of Exemption and Pending Levy in Certain Garnishment Proceedings, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill modifies exemptions and procedures in certain debt collection actions.
  • SB 15-202 – Concerning the Regulation of Water Conditioning Appliances Pursuant to the Plumbing Code, by Sen. David Balmer and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill creates three new categories of registered water conditioners.
  • HB 15-1301 – Concerning the Creation of a Credit for Tobacco Products that a Distributor Ships or Transports to an Out-of-State Consumer, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating the “Cigar On-Line Sales Equalization Act” and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Angela Williams and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Owen Hill. The bill creates a credit against tobacco excise tax equal to Colorado excise taxes paid on tobacco products other than cigarettes sold by a distributor to an out-of-state consumer.

In addition to the bills signed Friday, the governor allowed three bills to become law without a signature. These bills are also summarized here.

  • HB 15-1316 – Concerning a Simplification of the Process by which the Public Utilities Commission may Issue a Certificate to Provide Taxicab Service in Certain Metropolitan Counties, by Reps. Steve Lebsock & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Owen Hill & Jessie Ulibarri. The bill changes the prerequisites for an applicant seeking authorization to provide taxicab service within certain counties.
  • SB 15-067 – Concerning an Increase in the Class of Offense for Certain Acts of Assault Against Persons Engaged in Performing their Duties as Emergency Responders, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Janak Joshi. The bill raises the classification for assault of a first responder to assault in the second degree.
  • SB 15-290 – Concerning Creation of the Colorado Student Leaders Institute, And, In Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Jim Wilson. The bill creates the Colorado Student Leaders Institute, a competitive summer residential education program for high school students.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Supreme Court: Juvenile Life Sentences Subject to Consideration of Defendants’ “Youth and Attendant Characteristics”

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in the consolidated cases of People v. TateBanks v. People, and Jensen v. People on Monday, June 1, 2015.

Juvenile Sentencing.

In this consolidation of three cases, the Supreme Court examined the appropriate remedies for defendants who were given sentences that would be unconstitutional under Miller v. Alabama, 132 S.Ct. 2455 (2012). Miller held that it is a violation of the Eighth Amendment to sentence juveniles to life without the possibility of parole (LWOP) without first giving them individualized sentencing that takes into account their “youth and attendant characteristics.” Under the statutory scheme in place between 1990 and 2006, all three defendants were given mandatory LWOP sentences for crimes committed as juveniles.

Two of the cases, Tate and Banks, come on direct review. Miller therefore applies and renders their sentences unconstitutional. To preserve as much of the legislature’s work as possible, Tate and Banks should be given individualized resentencing hearings that take into account their “youth and attendant characteristics.” If the resentencing court determines LWOP is not warranted, the appropriate sentence is life with the possibility of parole (LWPP) after forty years. LWPP is appropriate in that instance because it was the sentence given both before 1990 and after 2006, and thus is what the legislature likely would have intended had they known about the subsequent constitutional rulings. The Court therefore remanded the cases for an individualized resentencing hearing to determine whether LWOP is warranted. If LWOP is not warranted, LWPP should be imposed.

The third case, Jensen, is a CAR 50 petition that came on collateral review of a final judgment. As such, the issue is whether Miller applies retroactively. Because the new rule from Miller is procedural rather than substantive and is not a “watershed” rule of procedure, it does not apply retroactively to cases on collateral review of a final judgment. It therefore does not apply to Jensen.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Juvenile Life Sentences on Collateral Review Not Subject to Constitutionality Test

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Vigil on Monday, June 1, 2015.

Juvenile Sentencing.

In this CAR 50 petition on collateral review of a final judgment, the Supreme Court held that Miller v. Alabama, 132 S.Ct. 2455 (2012), does not apply retroactively to cases on collateral review of a final judgment, and thus does not apply to Vigil. This holding was based on the Court’s decision in Jensen v. People, 2015 CO 42, __ P.3d __. The Court therefore reversed the trial court’s decision to grant Vigil’s collateral Crim.P. 35(c) motion pursuant to Miller.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Felony DUI, Child Protection Ombudsman, and Foster Care Background Check Bills Signed

On Monday, June 1, and Tuesday, June 2, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed three bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 290 bills into law this legislative session. The bills signed Monday and Tuesday are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1043 – Concerning Penalties for DUI Offenders, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Lori Saine & Beth McCann and Sens. John Cooke & Michael Johnston. The bill increases the penalties for third offenses of DUI, DUI per se, and DWAI so that they are class 4 felonies.
  • SB 15-204 – Concerning the Independent Functioning of the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Sens. Linda Newell & Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Jonathan Singer. The bill moves the office for the child protection ombudsman from a nonprofit organization to the Judicial Department.
  • SB 15-087 – Concerning the Safe Placement of Children in Foster Care Homes, by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Jonathan Singer. The bill reorganizes existing statutes regarding foster care homes, adds definitions for kinship foster care, and adds requirements for background checks of kinship foster care homes.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding COLTAF Accounts, Marijuana Concentrate Manufacture, Revision of Statutes, and More Signed

On Friday, May 29, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed 29 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 287 bills into law. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1348 – Concerning Modifications to Statutory Provisions Governing Urban Redevelopment to Promote the Equitable Financial Contribution Among Affected Public Bodies in Connection with Urban Redevelopment Projects Allocating Tax Revenues, by Reps. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Rollie Heath & David Balmer. The bill creates new requirements for urban redevelopment authorities, including changes to governance, procedures to follow, and distribution of excess funds.
  • HB 15-1186 – Concerning Home- and Community-Based Services for Children with Autism, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill expands eligibility for the Autism Waiver Program by increasing the age limit from 6 years to 8 years and removing the existing per child spending cap.
  • HB 15-1305 – Concerning a Prohibition on Manufacturing Marijuana Concentrate in an Unregulated Environment Using an Inherently Hazardous Substance, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Mike Foote & Yeulin Willett and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Michael Johnston. The bill makes it a class 2 felony for an unlicensed person to manufacture marijuana concentrate using an “inherently hazardous substance,” which term is also defined.
  • HB 15-1016 – Concerning Incentives for Precipitation Harvesting, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Don Coram and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill establishes a 10-year pilot program for collection of rooftop precipitation for non-potable purposes.
  • HB 15-1226 – Concerning Annual License Fees for Retail Food Establishments, by Rep. KC Becker and Sen. Mary Hodge. The bill removes the statutory annual license fees for retail food establishments and orders the State Board of Health to establish the fees in rule.
  • HB 15-1229 – Concerning Retaliation Against a Prosecutor, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Beth McCann and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill creates a new class 4 felony for the crime of retaliation against a prosecutor.
  • HB 15-1281 – Concerning Newborn Congenital Heart Defect Screening Through the Use of Pulse Oximetry, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Mary Hodge. The bill requires that all newborns born in Colorado at a facility below 7000 feet elevation be screened for heart defects using pulse oximetry.
  • SB 15-260 – Concerning Medical Marijuana Product Testing, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Joann Ginal. The bill authorizes creation of a medical marijuana testing facility and requires that all medical marijuana be tested once the facility is created.
  • HB 15-1372 – Concerning an Increase in the Cap Placed on the Annual Fee Each Public Utility Pays to Defray the Administrative Expenses of the Agencies Within the Department of Regulatory Agencies that Address Public Utility Matters, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Max Tyler & Jon Becker and Sens. Rollie Heath & David Balmer. The bill raises the statutory limit on fixed utility fund assessments for electric and natural gas utilities in order to cover an anticipated revenue shortfall.
  • SB 15-004 – Concerning Trained Volunteer Court-Appointed Special Advocates for Youth Brought Before a Court in a Truancy Proceeding, by Sen. Cheri Jahn and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill allows CASA volunteers to be appointed to help juveniles in truancy proceedings.
  • SB 15-124 – Concerning the Use of Evidence-Based Practices in Response to Technical Violations of Parole, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Sen. Michael Merrifield and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill clarifies and narrows the scope of behavior that warrants arresting a parolee for a technical violation.
  • HB 15-1365 – Concerning Adding two Youth Members to the Tony Grampsas Youth Services Board, by Rep. Beth McCann and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill allows two youth between the ages of 15 and 25 to be added to the Tony Grampsas Youth Services Board, which administers grants to community-based programs targeting youth and their families.
  • HB 15-1373 – Concerning the Creation of a Provisional Certification to Practice Speech-Language Pathology, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Irene Aguilar. The bill allows a speech-language pathologist to obtain a provisional certification prior to completion of a fellowship.
  • HB 15-1013 – Concerning the Implementation of Recommendation Number One Set Forth in the Study of the South Platte River Alluvial Aquifer Prepared by the Colorado Water Institute Pursuant to House Bill 12-1278, by Rep. Don Coram and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Mary Hodge. The bill implements the first recommendation of the Colorado Water Institute’s study of the South Platte River alluvial aquifer – namely, the bill requires the state engineer and CWCB to select two pilot projects for lowering the water table, and it also requires the state engineer to approve or propose changes to the operation of proposed recharge structures for augmentation plans.
  • HB 15-1233 – Concerning the Creation of the Respite Care Task Force, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Lois Landgraf and Sen. Irene Aguilar. The bill creates the Respite Care Task Force to study the supply and demand of respite care services in Colorado.
  • HB 15-1313 – Concerning the Creation of a Rocky Mountain National Park License Plate to Evidence that a Vehicle Has Been Registered, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. KC Becker and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill creates the Rocky Mountain National Park license plate, which will be available to any applicant upon payment of the $50 special plate fee and with a donation to Rocky Mountain National Park.
  • HB 15-1350 – Concerning Performance Measures for Accrediting an Alternative Education Campus, by Rep. Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill requires the Colorado Department of Education to convene stakeholder meetings to review statutes and State Board of Education rules relating to alternative education campuses.
  • HB 15-1364 – Concerning a Limitation on the Scope of an Inspection of a Small Hydroelectric Energy Facility Conducted by the State Electrical Board, by Reps. Don Coram & Diane Mitsch Bush and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Kerry Donovan. The bill clarifies when limited inspections apply to small hydroelectric facilities.
  • HB 15-1371 – Concerning an Exemption from the “Unclaimed Property Act” for Funds Held in Certain Lawyer Trust Accounts, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Yeulin Willett and Sen. Michael Johnston. The bill exempts COLTAF funds from the “Unclaimed Property Act.”
  • HB 15-1379 – Concerning Creation of Marijuana Permitted Economic Interest Registrations, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dan Pabon and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill allows people who are not Colorado residents to apply for authorization to hold a permitted economic interest in a marijuana business.
  • SB 15-102 – Concerning the Continuation of the Securities Board, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill implements the recommendation of the securities board sunset review by continuing the board until September 1, 2026.
  • SB 15-207 – Concerning the Authority of the State to Enter Into Lease-Purchase Agreements for the Refinancing of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation’s Grand Junction Regional Office and Forensic Laboratory, by Sens. Randy Baumgardner & Ray Scott and Rep. J. Paul Brown. The bill authorizes the state treasurer to enter into lease-purchase agreements to refinance revenue bonds used to construct the CBI Grand Junction office.
  • SB 15-208 – Concerning Capital-Related Expenditures, and, in Connection Therewith, Granting the Controller Authority to Allow Expenditures for Capital Construction Budget Appropriations if Nonmonetary Adjustments are Needed When the Legislature is Not in Session, Adding a Capital Development Committee-Approved Waiver for the Arts in Public Places Requirement, and Clarifying the Types of Capital Construction Projects to which the Arts in Public Places Requirement Applies, by Sen. John Kefalas and Rep. J. Paul Brown. The bill adds to the allowable reasons an emergency supplemental request related to a capital appropriation can be heard and acted upon between legislative sessions.
  • SB 15-212 – Concerning a Determination that Water Detention Facilities Designed to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Storm Water Runoff Do Not Materially Injure Water Rights, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. Faith Winter & Terri Carver. The bill specifies that storm water detention, infiltration, and post-wildland fire facilities that detain water do not injure water rights.
  • SB 15-185 – Concerning Provisions to Improve Police Operations, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Michael Johnston and Rep. Rhonda Fields. The bill creates the “Community Law Enforcement Action Reporting (CLEAR) Act,” which requires the Division of Criminal Justice to compile and report certain data to the General Assembly’s judiciary committees and the Colorado Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice.
  • SB 15-254 – Concerning an Extension of the Period During Which Certain Incentives are Available for Municipally Owned Utilities to Obtain Additional Renewable Energy Credits Based on the Installation of Solar Electric Generation Technologies, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill extends the deadline for municipally owned utilities to begin operating solar electric generation technologies until December 31, 2016.
  • SB 15-264 – Concerning the Nonsubstantive Revision of Statutes in the Colorado Revised Statutes, as Amended, and, in Connection Therewith, Amending or Repealing Obsolete, Imperfect, and Inoperative Law to Preserve the Legislative Intent, Effect, and Meaning of the Law, by Sen. Michael Johnston and Rep. Daniel Kagan. The bill revises the Colorado Revised Statutes to amend or repeal obsolete, unclear, or conflicting laws.
  • SB 15-265 – Concerning Conditions that Must Be Met Before a Hospital Care Lien is Created, by Sen. Bill Cadman and Rep. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst. The bill requires hospitals to submit charges for all care provided to a person injured by a third party to all the injured person’s payors of benefits before a lien can be created.
  • HB 15-1019 – Concerning Prostitution by a Minor, and, in Connection Therewith, Minors who are Victims of Human Trafficking, by Rep. Paul Lundeen and Sen. Laura Woods. The bill establishes areas of study for the Human Trafficking Council and requires the Council to make recommendations to the General Assembly about whether legislation should be enacted regarding child prostitution and human trafficking.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Several Bills Signed Last Week by Governor Hickenlooper

On Monday through Thursday last week, Governor Hickenlooper signed several bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 219 bills into law. The bills signed last week are summarized here.

Monday, May 11, 2015

  • HB 15-1198 – Concerning Enactment of the 2008 Amendments to the “Uniform Interstate Family Support Act”, by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill updates the Uniform Interstate Family Support Act to comply with mandates of the Hague Convention.
  • HB 15-1212 – Concerning Making Permanent the State Board of Land Commissioners’ Authority to Sell State Trust Land to Local Governments, by Rep. KC Becker and Sens. Andy Kerr & Michael Merrifield. The bill makes permanent the State Land Board’s authority to convey land to a local government twice in a year.
  • HB 15-1214 – Concerning Opioid Analgesics with Abuse-Deterrent Properties, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. John Cooke. The bill requires the governor to direct the Colorado Consortium for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention to study the use of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesic drugs.
  • HB 15-1280 – Concerning the Creation of a Capital Reserve in Certain Cash Funds, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill requires state agencies to identify capital reserves to pay costs associated with capital assets.
  • HB 15-1308 – Concerning Certain Responsibilities of the Legislative Branch with Respect to the “State Measurement for Accountable, Responsive, and Transparent (SMART) Government Act”, by Reps. Dominick Moreno & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Rollie Heath. The bill amends provisions of the SMART Act concerning meetings between members of the General Assembly and executive directors of state agencies.
  • SB 15-100 – Concerning Implementation of Recommendations of the Committee on Legal Services in Connection with Legislative Review of Rules and Regulations of State Agencies, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Reps. Mike Foote & Beth McCann. The bill continues some agency rules and regulations and allows others to expire based on recommendations of the Committee on Legal Services.
  • SB 15-104 – Concerning the Continuation of the Colorado Division of Securities, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill continues the Division of Securities and implements the recommendations of the sunset review.
  • SB 15-110 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation by the Director of the Division of Professions and Occupations of Funeral Establishments, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies as Contained in the 2014 Sunset Report and Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Joann Ginal. The bill continues the registration of funeral homes and crematories and implements suggestions of the sunset review.
  • SB 15-211 – Concerning an Automatic Funding Mechanism for Payment of Future Costs Attributable to Certain of the State’s Capital Assets, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill creates a process to automatically set aside capital to finance depreciation of assets.
  • SB 15-250 – Concerning Capital-Related Transfers of Moneys, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill changes the source of some capital construction fund moneys and makes three transfers to the CCF.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

  • SB 15-022 – Concerning the Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant Fund, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. J. Paul Brown. The bill transfers funds into the Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant Fund and changes terminology.
  • SB 15-205 – Concerning the Utilization of Veterans’ Fire Corps Programs by the Division of Fire Prevention and Control in the Department of Public Safety, by Sens. Ellen Roberts & Leroy Garcia and Reps. Jon Keyser & Millie Hamner. The bill recognizes the existence of veterans’ fire corps programs and authorizes the Department of Public Safety to use the Wildfire Preparedness Fund to train, equip, and supervise a veterans’ fire corps crew.
  • HB 15-1006 – Concerning the Establishment of a Grant Program for the Management of Invasive Phreatophytes, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Don Coram & Ed Vigil and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill creates a two-year grant program for the management of invasive phreatophyte plants in riparian zones of the state.

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

  • HB 15-1173 – Concerning a Requirement that Motor Vehicles Have Certain Traction Equipment when Driving on the Interstate 70 Mountain Corridor, by Reps. Diane Mitsch Bush & Bob Rankin and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill requires all drivers using I-70 between Morrison and Dotsero between November 1 and May 15 to use mountain snow tires or chains or have a four-wheel drive/all-wheel drive vehicle and imposes penalty for drivers who do not comply with this regulation.
  • HB 15-1225 – Concerning the Provision of State Assistance to Local Governments for the Purpose of Improved Coordination in Federal Land Management Decision-Making, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Bob Rankin & KC Becker and Sens. Ellen Roberts & Kerry Donovan. The bill requires certain executive branch officers and directors to provide support to local governments affected by federal land management.
  • HB 15-1271 – Concerning the Funding of Mobile Learning Labs Through the Colorado Existing Industry Training Program, by Reps. Susan Lontine & Millie Hamner and Sens. Vicki Marble & Kerry Donovan. The bill authorizes the Colorado Existing Industry Training Program to fund mobile learning labs, or stand-alone vehicles equipped with program-specific hands-on learning modules.
  • SB 15-138 – Concerning Funding for the Accelerating Students Through Concurrent Enrollment Program, by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Rep. Jim Wilson. The bill clarifies distribution of funding for ASCENT students.
  • SB 15-282 – Concerning the Establishment of a Rural Jump-Start Program in Highly Distressed Counties of the State for New Businesses that Bring New Jobs to the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Ray Scott & Michael Johnston and Reps. Crisanta Duran & Yeulin Willett. The bill provides tax benefits to new businesses that locate in a rural jump-start zone.

Thursday, May 14, 2015

  • HB 15-1217 – Concerning the Ability of a Local Licensing Authority to Provide Input to the State Licensing Authority on Applications for Approval to Operate a Sales Room Submitted by Certain Persons Licensed Under the “Colorado Liquor Code”, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill allows local governments to provide input on sales room license requests.
  • HB 15-1232 – Concerning the Emergency Use of Epinephrine Auto-Injectors by Authorized Entities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Joann Ginal & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Nancy Todd & Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill authorizes various facilities such as daycare centers, amusement parks, restaurants, and other locations where anaphylaxis could occur, to stock a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors via a valid prescription.
  • HB 15-1358 – Concerning Creating a Permanent Differential Response Program for Child Abuse or Neglect Cases of Low or Moderate Risk, by Rep.  Jonathan Singer and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & John Kefalas. The bill continues the Differential Response Pilot Program to divert low- and moderate-risk cases of abuse or neglect to voluntary services rather than adversarial court intervention.
  • SB 15-253 – Concerning the Funding of Colorado Water Conservation Board Projects, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill appropriates money from the CWCB Construction Fund for specific projects in FY 2015-16 and authorizes additional transfers.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding Oversight of CFIs, Electronic Benefits Card Transfer, and Promoting Water Conservation in Land Planning Signed

legislationOn Friday, May 1, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed 30 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 176 bills into law. The bills signed on May 1 are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1153 – Concerning Oversight of Child and Family Investigators, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill consolidates the oversight of all CFIs into the Office of the State Court Administrator.
  • HB 15-1255 – Concerning the Enforcement of the Prohibited Use of Electronic Benefits Transfer Cards at Certain Locations, by Reps. Timothy Dore & Dan Pabon and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Cheri Jahn. The bill requires periodic reporting of the use of electronic benefits cards at prohibited locations and adds marijuana retailers to the list of prohibited locations.
  • HB 15-1294 – Concerning Alignment of State Law Regarding In-State Tuition Classification with the Federal “Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014”, by Reps. Pete Lee & Jon Keyser and Sens. Nancy Todd & Owen Hill. The bill requires qualified Colorado institutes of higher education to classify eligible veterans as in-state for tuition purposes.
  • SB 15-008 – Concerning the Promotion of Water Conservation in the Land Use Planning Process, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill requires the Colorado Water Conservation Board to develop conservation programs for local government land use planners.
  • SB 15-046 – Concerning Reducing the Cost of Attainment of Renewable Energy Standards by Electric Utilities that are not Investor-Owned, and, in Connection Therewith, Allowing Purchases of Electricity from Community Solar Gardens by Cooperative Electric Associations to Qualify as Retail Distributed Generation, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dominick Moreno. The bill reduces the retail distributed generation requirement for cooperative electric associations.
  • SB 15-060 – Concerning the Prevention of Multiple Voter Registrations by the Same Elector, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Justin Everett. The bill allows the Secretary of State to forward any information from the DMV to the appropriate county clerk for the purpose of updating voter registration information.
  • SB 15-065 – Concerning a Prohibition on the Use of Public Electronic Benefits Transfer Services at Certain Establishments, by Sen. Vicki Marble and Rep. Dan Nordberg. The bill prohibits recipients of electronic benefits transfer cards from using them at adult entertainment facilities or marijuana establishments.
  • SB 15-085 – Concerning the Expansion of the “Colorado Cottage Foods Act,” and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Net Revenue a Producer Can Earn Under the Act, by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Faith Winter & Perry Buck. The bill allows “cottage food” producers to expand their allowable net revenues.
  • SB 15-106 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulatory Authority Granted Under the “Barber and Cosmetologist Act,” and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Cosmetology Advisory Committee and Implementing the Other Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies as Contained in the 2014 Sunset Report and Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill continues the “Barber and Cosmetologist Act” and enacts recommendations from the sunset review committee.
  • SB 15-122 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Massage Parlors, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing the Regulation of Massage Parlors, by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Dominick Moreno. The bill limits the ability of local governments to regulate massage parlors.
  • SB 15-178 – Concerning the Continuation of the Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Jessie Danielson. The bill continues the Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and implements recommendations of the sunset review committee.
  • SB 15-182 – Concerning Allowing the Department of Corrections to Transfer Certain Offenders to the Youthful Offender System to Participate in Age-Appropriate Programs, by Sens. Leroy Garcia & Larry Crowder and Reps. Clarice Navarro & Daneya Esgar. The bill allows the Department of Corrections to transfer offenders aged 24 or younger into or out of the Youthful Offender System.
  • SB 15-193 – Concerning the Consolidation of Two Reports that the Statewide Internet Portal Authority is Required to Submit to the Members of the General Assembly, by Sens. Patrick Neville & Tim Neville and Reps. Jack Tate & Max Tyler. The bill combines the reporting requirements of the Statewide Internet Portal Authority into one written report submitted to various legislative committees.
  • SB 15-194 – Concerning the Board of Directors of the Statewide Internet Portal Authority, by Sens. Patrick Neville & Tim Neville and Reps. Jack Tate & Max Tyler. The bill allows executive directors of executive branch agencies to select a designee to serve on the board in their stead, but designees may not serve as the board chair.
  • SB 15-198 – Concerning Modifications to the Colorado Water Conservation Board’s Fallowing Pilot Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Expanding the Program to Allow an Agricultural Water Right Owner to Lease an Agricultural Water Right for Temporary Agricultural, Environmental, Industrial, or Recreational Use, by Sen. Larry Crowder and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill allows an agricultural water right owner to lease its right for temporary agricultural, environmental, industrial, or recreational use while the agricultural land goes fallow.
  • SB 15-235 – Concerning Increasing the Amount that the General Assembly may Appropriate for the Child Nutrition School Lunch Protection Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill increases the appropriation for the state school lunch program.
  • SB 15-236 – Concerning the Reorganization of Funds Expended by the State Historical Society, Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill creates two separate subaccounts in the State Historical Fund.
  • SB 15-237 – Concerning Calculations Relating to Appropriations to Institutions of Higher Education, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying Calculations Required Pursuant to Sections 23-18-304 and 23-18-305, Colorado Revised Statutes, and Delaying Performance Funding Calculations Pursuant to Section 23-1-108, Colorado Revised Statutes, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill makes technical clarifications to definitions used in higher education funding formulas.
  • SB 15-238 – Concerning Allowable Uses of Moneys in the General Fund Exempt Account that are Designated to Benefit Students Attending Institutions of Higher Education, by Sen. Pat Steadman & Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill adds specific uses to the list of qualified higher education appropriations.
  • SB 15-240 – Concerning a Funding Formula for Independent Living Centers, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Dave Young. The bill requires DHS to promulgate a rule regarding funding for independent living centers and requires base funding of $600,000 to each center.
  • SB 15-241 – Concerning Collaborative Management of Multi-Agency Services Provided to Children and Families, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Dave Young. The bill allows moneys from the general fund to be allocated to the Collaborative Management Fund in the DHS and makes changes to the program for collaborative management.
  • SB 15-242 – Concerning an Allocation in Addition to the Child Welfare Block Grant to Counties for the Purpose of Hiring New Child Welfare Staff, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dave Young. The bill creates a new allocation for distributing funds to counties to hire additional child welfare staff.
  • SB 15-243 – Concerning a Prohibition on the Transfer of State-Operated Beds Under the Waiver for Home- and Community-Based Services for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Dave Young. The bill prohibits DHS from selling or closing state-operated centers with beds for individuals with disabilities.
  • SB 15-244 – Concerning the Transfer of Moneys to Offset the Federal Government’s Recoupment of Mineral Lease Payments to the State, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill transfers moneys from the General Fund for three fiscal years to offset recoupment of federal mineral lease moneys.
  • SB 15-245 – Concerning the Provision of State Funding for Natural Hazard Mapping, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dave Young. The bill creates a three-year program for state mapping of natural hazards.
  • SB 15-246 – Concerning Modifications to Accommodate Certain Statewide Financial Information Technology Systems in the Department of Personnel, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill requires the Department of Personnel and Administration to develop a method to bill users of its financial IT systems for the full cost of usage.
  • SB 15-248Concerning the Repeal of the State Facility Security Fund, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill repeals the state facility security fund, because there have been no grants made or deposits to the fund since its inception.
  • SB 15-249 – Concerning a Transfer from the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund to the General Fund, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill increases the transfer of moneys from the marijuana tax cash fund to the General Fund.
  • SB 15-251 – Concerning the Exclusion of Appropriations for Real Property Lease-Purchase Payments from the Basis for the Calculation of the General Fund Reserve, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill exempts payments for certificates of participation in lease-purchase agreements from the General Fund for purposes of calculating reserves.
  • SB 15-255 – Concerning the Deposit of Twenty Million Dollars of State Severance Tax Revenues in the General Fund, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill diverts money from the state severance tax fund to the General Fund.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.