June 30, 2016

Bills Implementing “SAFE Act,” Allowing Issuance of Summonses in Lieu of Warrants, and More Signed

On Thursday, April 21, and Friday, April 22, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed more bills into law. He signed 19 bills on Thursday and five bills on Friday. To date, the governor has signed 141 bills this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Thursday and Friday include a bill to limit the imposition of conditions by federal entities on Colorado water rights, changing the statutory purpose of parole in order to facilitate integration into society for parolees, limiting laws governing security interests in business entities, and more. The bills signed Thursday and Friday are summarized here.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

  • HB 16-1035 – Concerning the Scope of Statutes Making the Issuance of Securities by a Public Utility Conditional on Approval by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying that the Approval Requirement Applies Only to Electric and Gas Utilities, by Rep. Timothy Leonard and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill clarifies that only public electric and gas utilities are required to apply to the Public Utilities Commission for approval to issue or assume securities.
  • HB 16-1060 – Concerning Roadside Memorials for Fallen State Patrol Officers, by Rep. Max Tyler and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill requires CDOT to erect and maintain a permanent roadside memorial for every Colorado State Patrol officer who has perished on the highway in the line of duty.
  • HB 16-1093 – Concerning the Use of the National Change of Address Database to Maintain Voter Registration Records, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying Terminology and Consolidating Procedures for County Clerks and Recorders to Follow when it Appears that an Elector has Moved Within the State, by Reps. Kim Ransom & Su Ryden and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill changes the process that must be followed by county clerks to confirm a voter address if the monthly search determines that a voter may have moved.
  • HB 16-1104 – Concerning the Issuance of a Summons in Lieu of a Warrant for Certain Non-Violent Offenders, by Rep. Kit Roupe and Sen. John Cooke. The bill allows law enforcement officers to issue a summons in lieu of a warrant if the officer believes there is a reasonable likelihood the defendant will appear, the local district attorney approves and has developed criteria for the procedure, the defendant has had no felony arrests in the past five years, there is no allegation that the defendant used a deadly weapon, and there are no outstanding warrants for the defendant’s arrest.
  • HB 16-1109 – Concerning that the Basic Tenets of Colorado Water Law Place on the Ability of Certain Federal Agencies to Impose Conditions on a Water Right Owner in Exchange for Permission to use Federal Land, by Reps. KC Becker & Jon Becker and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Kerry Donovan. The bill states that Colorado water is a transferable property right and that the federal government must comply with state law, through the water court process, to acquire water rights.
  • HB 16-1141 – Concerning the Protection of Colorado Residents from the Hazards Associated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Buildings, and in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. KC Becker & Don Coram and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Ellen Roberts. The bill requires the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to establish a radon education and awareness program to provide information and education statewide to citizens, businesses, and others in need of information, and requires that, by January 1, 2017, the CDPHE stablish a radon mitigation assistance program to provide financial assistance to low-income individuals for radon mitigation services.
  • HB 16-1153 – Concerning the Annual Date by which the General Assembly Receives a Report Regarding Outcomes of Decisions Made by the State Board of Parole, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. John Cooke. The bill extends the deadline by which reports on parole outcomes made by the State Board of Parole and the Division of Criminal Justice are required from November 1 to March 31.
  • HB 16-1173 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Vessels by the Department of Natural Resources, by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill indefinitely removes the sunset of the Vessel Registration Program conducted by the Department of Regulatory Agencies to continue the registration and regulation of vessels program by Colorado Parks and Wildlife in the Department of Natural Resources.
  • HB 16-1198 – Concerning Computer Science Courses Fulfilling Certain Graduation Requirements, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Jim Wilson and Sens. Jack Tate & Andy Kerr. The bill encourages school districts to treat computer science and coding classes as mathematics or science courses and count completion of such computer-related courses toward the fulfillment of any mathematics or science graduation requirements.
  • HB 16-1215 – Concerning Changing the Statutory Purposes of Parole to Successfully Reintegrate Parolees into Society by Providing Enhanced Supportive Services, by Reps. Beth McCann & Daniel Kagan and Sen. Lucia Guzman. The bill redefines the purpose of parole to enhance public safety by reducing recidivism, select and prepare individuals who will be transitioned into the community, set individualized conditions of parole, and achieve a successful discharge from parole.
  • HB 16-1230 – Concerning the Inclusion of a County’s Financial Information in the State’s Financial Information Database, which is known as the Transparency Online Project, by Rep. Timothy Dore and Sen. John Cooke. The bill requires counties to provide the state Chief Information Officer with a copy of the county’s adopted budget no later than 30 days after the fiscal year begins, starting January 1, 2018.
  • HB 16-1255 – Concerning Additional Methods to Manage Forests to Secure Favorable Conditions for Water Supply, by Reps. Don Coram & Ed Vigil and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill directs the Colorado state forest service to conduct demonstration pilot projects to implement forest management treatments that improve forest health and resilience, supply forest products to Colorado businesses, and target a Colorado watershed.
  • HB 16-1258 – Concerning the Posting by Court Clerks of Process When a Respondent is Served by Publication, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. Current law mandates that clerks of court post the process for notice of a divorce proceeding on a bulletin board in their office when one party cannot be reached. This bill adds the option that clerks can post the process on a bulletin board or the website of the district court in which the case was filed.
  • HB 16-1259 – Concerning Local District Junior Colleges, and, in Connection Therewith, Changing the Term Local District Junior College to Local District College, by Reps. Diane Mitsch Bush & Jim Wilson and Sens. John Cooke & Kerry Donovan. The bill changes all statutory references to “local junior college” or “junior college” to “local district college” and changes requirements regarding number of board members, actions taken without regular meetings, and annexation.
  • HB 16-1270 – Concerning the Limitation of Laws Governing Security Interests to an Owner’s Interest in a Business Entity, by Rep. Pete Lee and Sens. Mark Scheffel & Rollie Heath. The bill allows small businesses to control their ownership under the Colorado Corporation and Associations Act and the Uniform Commercial Code.
  • HB 16-1271 – Concerning the Ability of a Limited Winery that has a Winery Direct Shipper’s Permit to Deliver Vinous Liquors of its Own Manufacture Directly to a Personal Consumer Without the Use of a Common Carrier, by Reps. Jonathan Singer & Dan Nordberg and Sens. Cheri Jahn & Kevin Lundberg. Under current law, a limited winery licensee with a winery direct shipper’s permit may only use a common carrier to deliver the wine it manufactures to personal consumers within Colorado. This bill allows a limited winery licensee to deliver the wine it manufactures directly to personal consumers without the use of a common carrier, as long as the licensee also has a winery direct shipper’s permit and follows the requirements of the permit.
  • HB 16-1306 – Concerning Revision of the State Statutes Governing Mortgage Loan Originators to Conform More Closely to Applicable Federal Law, and, in Connection Therewith, Amending, Relocating, and Repealing Provisions in Accordance with the Federal “Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act Of 2008,” by Rep. Angela Williams and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill  amends, relocates, and repeals provisions of Colorado’s mortgage loan originator licensing statutes that conflict with or have been rendered unnecessary by recent changes to federal law, or no longer reflect current national industry standards.
  • HB 16-1316 – Concerning Procedures for Changing Venue for Proceedings Relating to a Child Placed in the Legal Custody of a County Department of Social or Human Services, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. John Cooke. The bill amends the Colorado Children’s Code to state that a child who is placed in the legal custody of a county department shall be deemed, for the entire period of the placement, to reside in the county in which the child’s legal parent or guardian resides or is located. This applies even if the child physically resides in an out-of-home placement located in another county.
  • HB 16-1327 – Concerning the Colorado Dental Board’s Authority to Promulgate Rules Implementing Financial Responsibility Requirements for Dental Care Providers, by Rep. Joann Ginal and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill allows the State Dental Board to establish lesser financial responsibility requirements for professional liability insurance for dental hygienists that meet certain criteria.

Friday, April 22, 2016

  • HB 16-1070 – Concerning a Signature Verification Requirement for Municipal Mail Ballot Elections, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Patrick Neville and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill requires an election judge to compare the signature on each ballot return envelope with the signature of the eligible elector stored in the statewide voter registration system for every municipal mail ballot election.
  • HB 16-1155 – Concerning Authorization for a County to Designate a Four-Lane Controlled-Access Highway that is Located in the County as a Primary Road of the County Highway System, and, in Connection Therewith, Specifying the Jurisdiction, Control, and Duties of the County and of a Municipality Through which the Highway Passes with Respect to Such a Highway, by Reps. Lori Saine & Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill allows a county with a population of 250,000 or more to designate a four-lane, controlled-access county highway in an unincorporated county area that intersects with an interstate highway or a U.S. numbered highway as a primary road of the county if the construction begins in 2016.
  • HB 16-1323 – Concerning Changing the Name of the Division of Labor to the Division of Labor and Statistics, by Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. John Cooke. The bill changes the name of the Division of Labor and Employment within the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) to the Division of Labor Standards and Statistics.
  • HB 16-1350 – Concerning the Department of Higher Education’s Authority to Make Transfers Relating to a Governing Board’s Fee-For-Service Contracts for Specialty Education, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. Under current law, the Department of Higher Education may transfer up to ten percent of the annual total governing board appropriation for an institution of higher education between that governing board’s appropriation for college opportunity fund (COF) stipends, and that governing board’s fee-for-service (FFS) contracts for higher education services and programs. The bill expands the department’s authority to transfer between the COF and FFS appropriations for specialty education programs.
  • HB 16-1352 – Concerning the Appropriation of Moneys from the State Museum Cash Fund for the Benefit of Facilities Owned and Operated by the State Historical Society, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill allows moneys in the fund to also be appropriated for exhibit planning, development, and build-out at other State Historical Society facilities, and, for FY 2016-17, appropriates $2 million from the fund for those purposes. The State Historical Society has four years to spend the appropriation.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Limiting Foreclosure Finder’s Fee, Clarifying Documentary Recording Fees, and More Signed by Governor

On Friday, April 15, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 117 bills this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Friday include a bill reducing finder’s fees for public trustee foreclosures, a bill treating sexual trafficking of a child as child abuse for dependency and neglect cases, a bill clarifying how to calculate filing fees for recording grants or conveyances of real property, and more. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1011 – Concerning the Removal of Restrictions on the Authority of a Board of a Metropolitan District to Provide Activities in Support of Business Development Within the District, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sens. Leroy Garcia & Kevin Grantham. The bill removes the specified minimum valuation of commercial property for which a board of a metropolitan district can provide activities in support of business recruitment, management, and development.
  • HB 16-1066 – Concerning an Habitual Domestic Violence Offender, by Rep. Kit Roupe and Sen. Linda Newell. Currently, a judge must make a finding of fact regarding whether a defendant is a habitual domestic violence offender. The bill specifies that the trier of fact (judge or jury) may determine habitual status.
  • HB 16-1073 – Concerning the Qualifications of Licensed Electricians, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Brian DelGrosso and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Mark Scheffel. The bill creates new renewal requirements for people seeking to renew licenses as master electricians, journeyman electricians, or residential wiremen. Renewal applicants will be required to complete 24 hours of continuing education rather than passing a competency evaluation.
  • HB 16-1090 – Concerning the Conditions Under Which a Person May Assist Another for Compensation in Obtaining the Proceeds of a Foreclosure Sale After All Liens Have Been Satisfied, by Rep. Beth McCann and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill limits the premium, or finder’s fee, that a person may charge for offering assistance in recovering the balance of the purchase price of a foreclosed property after all liens and claims against the property have been satisfied.
  • HB 16-1098 – Concerning Updates to Provisions Relating to School Discipline Reporting, by Rep. Polly Lawrence and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill modifies school discipline reporting requirements, requiring that agencies of the Judicial Department make information regarding expunged juvenile delinquency proceedings available to the Division of Criminal Justice, specifies that the attorney general’s requirement to report names of students given criminal citations or diversion is exempt from statutes prohibiting dissemination of confidential information, and allows aggregation of data about incidents involving law enforcement on school property.
  • HB 16-1103 – Concerning Clarifying License Pathways for the Mental Health Professional Workforce, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Nancy Todd. The bill specifies that candidates seeking licensure as mental health professionals may, but are not required to, register with the database of registered psychotherapists after completing their degree.
  • HB 16-1106 – Concerning the Authority of a County to Designate Public Roads as a Section of a Pioneer Trail, by Rep. Jim Wilson and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Leroy Garcia. The bill allows a board of county commissioners to designate by resolution any public roads in the county as a pioneer trail, with certain conditions.
  • HB 16-1145 – Concerning the Determination of the Documentary Fee Imposed for Recording a Grant or Conveyance of Residential Real Property, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill clarifies that the filing fee for a residential real property conveyance is calculated based on the total sales price, as listed on the conveyance document, and if there is no sales price listed or the amount is less than $500, the documentary fee is calculated based on the total sales price listed on the declaration form.
  • HB 16-1149 – Concerning a Requirement that the Executive Board of a Common Interest Community Created in Colorado Before July 1, 1992, Comply with the Budget Reporting Provision of the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act”, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. Linda Newell. Currently, common interest communities established before July 1, 1992 are exempt from certain reporting requirements. The bill removes the exemption.
  • HB 16-1170 – Concerning the Continuation of the Division of Racing Events in the Department of Revenue, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing Recommendation 1 of the 2015 Sunset Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Reps. Ed Vigil & Don Coram and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Leroy Garcia. The bill extends the sunset of the Division of Racing Events and the Colorado Racing Commission until September 1, 2023.
  • HB 16-1189 – Concerning the Regulation of Bingo-Raffle Licenses, by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill makes changes to the Secretary of State’s regulation of bingo-raffle licenses. Specifically, the bill allows people whose license was denied to appeal to an ALJ within 60 days, clarifies when consolation prizes must be reported, and removes a restriction on the number of games a person can be a game manager for.
  • HB 16-1224 – Concerning Child Abuse Involving Human Trafficking of Minors, by Rep. Paul Lundeen and Sen. Laura Woods. The bill adds human trafficking of a minor for sexual servitude or commercial sexual exploitation to the definition of child abuse for purposes of dependency and neglect. The bill also requires county departments of human services to immediately offer services to children who are victims of human trafficking when appropriate and to file petitions in juvenile court on the child’s behalf.
  • HB 16-1236 – Concerning Continuation of the Infection Control Advisory Committee, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill extends the sunset of the Infection Control Advisory Committee until July 1, 2021.
  • SB 16-013 – Concerning Statutory Changes Related to the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman, by Sen. Linda Newell & Rep. Jonathan Singer. The bill makes several statutory changes regarding the Office of the Child Protection Ombudsman, including clarifying its board’s advisory nature, clarifying certain duties and the relationship between the office and the Judicial Department, and removing an audit requirement.
  • SB 16-125 – Concerning the Governance of Credit Unions, and, in Connection Therewith, Authorizing the Appointment of an Audit Committee in Lieu of a Supervisory Committee and Allowing the Reasonable Compensation of a Director for His or Her Service to the Credit Union, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill allows the board of directors of a credit union to appoint an audit committee in lieu of a supervisory committee.

For all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

e-Legislative Report: Week of April 11, 2016

legislationWelcome to another edition of the e-leg report. We’re nearing the halfway point at the capitol, and that means the state budget debate is at hand. A number of bills that the CBA is working are subject to appropriations – and only after the budget debate is settled will we know whether they are likely to be funded or not.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me atjschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings—please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

Here is a quick rundown of the bills on which we have recently taken a position.

HB 16-1211 – Marijuana Transporter License

The bill creates a retail marijuana transporter license and a medical marijuana transporter license. The license is valid for five years. A licensed marijuana transporter (transporter) provides logistics, distribution, and storage of marijuana and marijuana products. A transporter may contract with multiple businesses and may also hold another marijuana license. A transporter must be licensed by December 31, 2017, in order to continue to operate. The bill describes the circumstances under which a business can terminate a contract with a transporter.

The Bar’s Cannabis Law Committee is currently monitoring and preparing comments on this bill. The bill is working through its first chamber and has been greatly amended from its original form. The Legislative Policy Committee has not taken action on this bill.

HB 16-1235 – Commissions Evaluating State Judicial Performance

The bill makes revisions to various functions of the state commission on judicial performance (state commission) and the district commissions on judicial performance (district commission), referred to collectively as the “commissions.”

This bill was postponed indefinitely (killed) in the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee. The Colorado Bar Association had many concerns with the cost and operation of the bill.

HB 16-1270 – Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity

Under current law, the Uniform Commercial Code (Code) invalidates contractual limits on the transferability of some assets that can be subject to a security interest. In 2006, the Colorado Corporations and Associations Act (Act) was amended to clearly and broadly exempt an owner’s interest in a business entity from these Code provisions to effectuate the “pick your partner” principle that allows small businesses to control their ownership. Section 3 of the bill narrows the exemption in the Act to that necessary for “pick your partner,” and sections 1 and 2 codify this narrowed exemption in the Code.

This bill, part of a four bill package of business entities clean up acts, was supported by the Bar and has passed the House and Senate and is on its way to be signed by the Governor.

HB 16-1275 – Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven

The bill pertains to an affiliated group of corporations filing a combined report. In a combined report filing, the tax is based on a percentage of the entire taxable income of all of the includable corporations, but the tax is assessed only against the corporation or corporations doing business in Colorado. Including more affiliated corporations in the combined report may result in an increase in income subject to tax.

There are jurisdictions located outside of the United States with no tax or very low rates of taxation, strict bank secrecy provisions, a lack of transparency in their tax system operations, and a lack of effective exchange of information with other countries. There are several common legal strategies for sheltering corporate income in such jurisdictions, often called “tax havens.”

Notwithstanding a current requirement in state law that those corporations with 80% or more of their property and payroll assigned to locations outside of the United States be excluded from a combined report, the bill makes a corporation that is incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance an includable C corporation for purposes of the combined report.

The bill defines a corporation incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance to mean any C corporation that is incorporated in a jurisdiction that has no or nominal effective tax on the relevant income and that meets one or more of five factors listed in the bill, unless it is proven to the satisfaction of the executive director of the Department of Revenue that such corporation is incorporated in that jurisdiction for a legitimate business purpose.

The bill requires the state controller to credit a specified amount per fiscal year to the state education fund to be used to help fund public school education.

The bill requires the secretary of state to submit a ballot question, to be treated as a proposition, at the statewide election to be held in November 2016 asking voters:

  • To increase taxes annually by the taxation of a corporation’s state income that is sheltered in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance;
  • To use the resulting tax revenue to help fund elementary and secondary public school education; and
  • To allow an estimate of the resulting tax revenue to be collected and spent notwithstanding any limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution (TABOR).

The Tax Law section of the CBA voted to oppose this bill, which was postponed indefinitely (killed) by the Senate State Affairs Committee. The Bar had concerns over the cost of vague language in the bill as well as the impact on the courts and judicial system.

HB 16-1310 – Operators Liable For Oil And Gas Operations

Under current law governing relations between surface owners and oil and gas operators, to prevail on a claim the surface owner must present evidence that the operator’s use of the surface materially interfered with the surface owner’s use of the surface of the land. The bill amends this requirement to allow proof that the operator’s oil and gas operations harmed the surface owner’s use of the surface of the land, caused bodily injury to the surface owner or any person residing on the property of the surface owner, or damaged the surface owner’s property.

The Legislative Policy Committee voted to oppose this bill because it upends the burden of proof responsibility. The bill has passed the House and is moving on to the Senate, where it will be heard by the Agriculture Committee.

HB 16-1331 – Policies On Juvenile Shackling In Court

The bill requires restraints on a juvenile to be removed prior to any court proceeding, except when the court determines the restraints are necessary:

  • To prevent physical harm to the juvenile or another person;
  • To prevent disruptive courtroom behavior by the juvenile, evidenced by a history of behavior that created potentially harmful situations or presented substantial risk of physical harm; or
  • To prevent the juvenile from fleeing the courtroom, when there is evidence of an escape history or other relevant factors.

The prosecution, sheriff, or any other detention or pretrial personnel may request that an individual juvenile be restrained in the courtroom. The court shall provide the juvenile’s attorney an opportunity to be heard before the court allows the use of restraints on a juvenile. The court may conduct a hearing on the use of restraints without the juvenile being present.

The CBA supports this bill as good policy and an extension of the efforts the courts have made this past year. While the courts need discretion, we believe this bill strikes the right balance for outlining the policies on how and when juveniles should be subject to shackling.

HB 16-1346 – Open Records Subject To Inspection Denial

The bill allows a custodian to deny access to confidential personal information records and employee personal e-mail addresses. The provisions of the Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) that relate to civil or administrative investigations and trade secrets and other privileged and confidential information apply to the judicial branch.

The Bar Association opposed this bill because of constitutional and separation of powers concerns regarding the relationship between the judicial and legislative branches of government. In addition, we believe that the PAIRR rules issued by the Chief Justice, which closely mirror the text of CORA, are better suited to meet the information needs of requesters while maintaining the integrity of judicial records.

HB 16-1394 -Aligning Issues Around At-risk Persons

The bill implements the following recommendations of the at-risk adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities mandatory reporting implementation task force:

  • Standardizing statutory definitions among the Colorado Criminal Code, adult protective services in the department of human services, and the office of community living in the department of health care policy and financing;
  • Specifying that enhanced penalties for crimes against an at-risk person apply to all persons 70 years of age or older and to all persons with a disability; and
  • Clarifying and expanding the definitions of persons who are required to report instances of mistreatment of at-risk elders or at-risk adults with an intellectual and developmental disability (adults with IDD).

The bill also:

  • Reduces the time in which a law enforcement agency or county department is required to prepare a written report from 48 hours to 24 hours;
  • Specifies that a county department of human or social services is to conduct an investigation of allegations of mistreatment of an at-risk adult; and
  • Clarifies that the human rights committee is responsible for ensuring that an investigation of mistreatment of an adult with IDD occurred.

The Colorado Bar Association opposed the bill as written, but is working with stakeholders to review amendments from other stakeholder groups. We are working with and talking with the sponsors frequently.

SB 16-130 – Methods To Collect Consumer Use Tax

Consumer use tax is the complement to sales tax and is due on the purchases of goods where the retailer did not charge sales tax. For example, any time consumers make an Internet purchase and the out-of-state retailer does not charge sales tax, the purchaser should pay the equivalent amount of sales tax as consumer use tax directly to the Colorado Department of Revenue (department). The department has added a use tax line to the 2015 individual income tax return form in an effort to make self-reporting of use tax more convenient for consumers.

The bill specifies that after the 2015 income tax year the department is not allowed to add use tax reporting lines to the individual income tax return form for any reason. The bill also prohibits the department from auditing any taxpayer for any amount he or she reported on the use tax lines included in the 2015 individual income tax return form.

The CBA is monitoring this bill and has sought permission to make changes to the bill to ensure that collecting use taxes is efficient.

SB 16-131 Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets

The bill clarifies statutory language concerning the removal of a fiduciary to ensure that a fiduciary’s authority is suspended as soon as a petition to remove the fiduciary is filed. The bill adds a provision to the conservatorship statutes stating that an adult ward or protected person has a right to be represented by a lawyer of their choosing unless the trial court finds the person lacks sufficient capacity to provide informed consent for representation by a lawyer. The bill states that after a fiduciary receives notice of proceedings for his, her, or its removal, the fiduciary shall not pay compensation or attorney fees and costs from the estate without an order of the court.

This bill rearranges the existing responsibilities for fiduciaries managing assets. It is a cleanup and reorganization of these statutes and adds the right to legal counsel for wards and protected persons. The bill is scheduled for committee later this week.

SB 16-133 – Transfer Of Property Rights At Death

Under current law, a certificate of death, a verification of death document, or a certified copy thereof, of a person who is a joint tenant may be placed of record with the county clerk and recorder of the county in which the real property affected by the joint tenancy is located, together with a supplementary affidavit. The bill removes the requirement that the person who swears to and affirms the supplementary affidavit has no record interest in the real property. The bill includes inherited individual retirement accounts and inherited Roth individual retirement accounts as property exempt from levy and sale under writ of attachment or writ of execution.

The bill amends provisions concerning determination-of-heirship proceedings, as follows:

  • Clarifies the definition of “interested person” so that anyone affected by the ownership of property may commence a proceeding;
  • Describes when an unprobated will may be used as part of a proceeding;
  • Clarifies notice requirements; and
  • Ensures that a judgment and decree will convey legal title as opposed to equitable title.

The bill enacts portions of section 5 of the Uniform Power of Appointment Act, with amendments.
This bill, the second part of the Colorado Bar Association’s probate reorganization bills, has passed the legislature and will be sent to the Governor shortly.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link:
http://www.statebillinfo.com/sbi/index.cfm?fuseaction=Public.Dossier&id=21762&pk=996

Bills to Make References to Attorney General Gender Neutral, Authorize Pink Vests for Hunters, and More Signed

On Tuesday, April 12, 2016, the governor signed six bills into law, and on Thursday, April 14, 2016, the governor signed 18 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 102 bills into law this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Tuesday and Thursday include a bill to make statutory references to the attorney general gender neutral, a bill to allow hunters to wear fluorescent pink vests, a bill allowing employees of an alcohol wholesaler to purchase alcohol at wholesale prices, a bill increasing judicial discretion in sentencing for violent crimes, and more. The bills signed Tuesday and Thursday are summarized here.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

  • SB 16-068 – Concerning Wearing Fluorescent Pink Garments to Hunt Big Game, by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Reps. Daneya Esgar & Yeulin Willett. Currently, hunters of big game are required to wear fluorescent orange clothing. The bill allows hunters to wear fluorescent pink as well.
  • HB 16-1030 – Concerning the Use of Off-Highway Vehicles, by Reps. J. Paul Brown & Lois Court and Sen. Kerry Donovan. Currently, anyone age 10 or over can operate an off-highway vehicle with supervision of a licensed driver. The bill allows local governments to require off-highway vehicle operators to have a driver’s license or carry liability insurance.
  • HB 16-1163 – Concerning Appropriations from the Noxious Weed Management Fund, by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill specifies that unexpended monies in the noxious weed management fund are subject to reappropriation.
  • HB 16-1182 – Concerning the Continuation of the Commodity Metals Theft Task Force, by Reps. Lois Court & Crisanta Duran and Sens. John Cooke & Rollie Heath. The bill extends the sunset of the Commodity Metals Theft Task Force until September 1, 2025.
  • HB 16-1184 – Concerning the Administration of Money that Is Required Under Existing Law to be Transferred from the High Cost Support Mechanism to the Broadband Fund, by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill requires that the High Cost Support Mechanism funds be transferred to the Broadband Fund on July 1 of each year, rather than on allocation.
  • HB 16-1269 – Concerning the Ability of the Department of Revenue to Allow Additional Application Methods for Identification Cards, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. John Cooke. The bill allows holders of Colorado driver’s licenses that are current or less than one year out-of-date to apply by mail for an identification card.

Thursday, April 14, 2016

  • HB 16-1094 – Concerning Making References to the Attorney General in the Colorado Revised Statutes Gender Neutral, by Rep. Timothy Dore and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill revises the Colorado Revised Statutes to make references to the attorney general gender-neutral.
  • HB 16-1157 – Concerning the Establishment of a Future Sunset Review of the Functions Delegated to the Director of the Division of Professions and Occupations Under the “Michael Skolnik Medical Transparency Act of 2010” to Implement the Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies as Contained in its 2015 Sunset Report Pertaining to the Division of Professions and Occupations, by Reps. Alec Garnett & Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill adds a September 1, 2021, sunset date for the Michael Skolnik Medical Transparency Act of 2010.
  • HB 16-1168 – Concerning the Continuation of the Rural Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program, by Reps. Joann Ginal & Jessie Danielson and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill extends the sunset of the Rural Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program until September 1, 2025.
  • HB 16-1169 – Concerning the Appointment of Representatives of the Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute Tribes as Voting Members of the Statewide Transportation Advisory Committee, by Rep. Don Coram and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill alters the membership of the Statewide Transportation Advisory Committee to include as full voting members one representative from the Southern Ute Tribe and one representative from the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.
  • HB 16-1176 – Concerning the Authority of a Licensed Wholesaler to Establish an Employee Purchase Program Under Which its Employees May Purchase Directly from the Wholesaler Alcohol Beverage Products Sold by that Wholesaler, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill allows licensed vinous and spiritous wholesalers to establish an employee purchase program.
  • HB 16-1188 – Concerning Requirements for the Provision of Additional Public Information by a Separate Legal Entity Established by Contract by a Combination of Political Subdivisions of the State, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill requires a separate legal entity formed by a combination of local governments and political subdivisions to file a copy of the intergovernmental agreement with the Division of Local Government in the Department of Local Affairs.
  • HB 16-1190 – Concerning the Use of Deadly Force in a Detention Facility, by Rep. Timothy Dore and Sen. John Cooke. The bill clarifies that deadly force is not allowed against intruders in a dwelling that is a detention facility.
  • HB 16-1192 – Concerning a Nonsubstantive Recodification of the Sunset Review Procedures, by Rep. Daniel Kagan and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill reorganizes sunset review provisions in statutes by removing repealed provisions and renumbering the remaining provisions for clarity.
  • HB 16-1193 – Concerning Granting Electronic Access to Court Information to Attorneys Under Contract with the Office of the Respondent Parents’ Counsel, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill grants attorneys working with the Office of Respondent Parents’ Counsel electronic access to the name index and register of actions databases in the Judicial Department.
  • HB 16-1229 – Concerning Modification of the Means of Repayment for Certain Ongoing Financial Obligations Incurred by the State in Order to Fund Capital Construction Projects for State-Supported Institutions of Higher Education, by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Pat Steadman. Currently, a portion of the Federal Mineral Lease revenue is transferred into a reserve fund and a revenues fund to support capital construction projects at institutes of higher education. The bill specifies that for this fiscal year, all money in the reserve fund should be transferred into the revenues fund and the reserve fund should be eliminated.
  • HB 16-1247 – Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Public Health and Environment, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill allows a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Public Health and Environment.
  • HB 16-1272 – Concerning Procedures to be Followed in Connection with the Disconnection by Ordinance of Land from a Municipality, by Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill modifies the procedures for the owner of a tract of land adjacent to a municipality to have the tract of land disconnected from the municipality.
  • HB 16-1297 – Concerning the Immediate Reestablishment of the Voluntary Contributions Excluded from the 2015 Colorado Income Tax Return Form for Not Receiving the Requisite Minimum Dollar Amount of Contributions by the Statutory Deadline, and, in Connection Therewith, Expanding the Number of Voluntary Contributions that May Appear on the Income Tax Return Form and Lowering the Minimum Amount of Donations that Must be Received by Every Fund Appearing on the Form, by Rep. Lois Court and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill expands the number of voluntary contribution income tax check-offs on a state income tax form from 15 to 20 and lowers the minimum contribution amount that a program must receive to stay on the form from $75,000 to $50,000, and reestablishes check-offs that were removed last year because they did not meet the minimum contribution amount.
  • HB 16-1416 – Concerning the Transfer of Money from the General Fund to Cash Funds that are Used for the State’s Infrastructure, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill replaces transfers specified as percentages with actual dollar amounts.
  • SB 16-051 – Concerning Increasing Judicial Discretion Regarding the Imposition of Consecutive Sentences for Violent Crimes, by Sens. Mike Johnston & Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill removes the requirement that people who commit two or more separate, specified crimes of violence arising out of the same incident be sentenced consecutively.
  • SB 16-099 – Concerning Implementing Recommendations of the State Auditor’s Office by Establishing the Authority of the Correctional Education Program to Sell Inmate-Produced Products to Specified Persons, by Sen. Cheri Jahn and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill authorizes the correctional education program to sell goods produced by inmates to other inmates, invited guests, employees of the department, governmental agencies, or nonprofit organizations, provided certain conditions are met.
  • SB 16-110 – Concerning Protecting the Privacy of Child Victims when Releasing Criminal Justice Records, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Paul Lundeen. The bill requires the custodian of criminal justice records to make a notation of “child victim” whenever the name is disclosed during official proceedings, except when information is shared between certain state and local government agencies.
  • SB 16-122 – Concerning Additional Oversight of the Activities of the Department of Transportation, by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Reps. Dan Nordberg & J. Paul Brown. The bill requires the Colorado Department of Transportation to undergo an audit, release funds budgeted for certain projects within one year or sooner, post on its website information related to public bid contracts, and more.

For all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

HB 16-1058: Creating the Crime of Misuse of Electronic Images by a Juvenile

On January 13, 2016, Reps. Yeulin Willett & Rhonda Fields and Sens. Linda Newell & John Cooke introduced HB 16-1058 – Concerning Creating the Crime of Misuse of Electronic Images by a Juvenile. The bill was introduced in the House and assigned to the Public Health Care & Human Services Committee. The committee heard testimony but the bill failed on a committee vote.

This bill creates the crime of misuse of sexually explicit images by a minor. The offense prohibits individuals under eighteen years of age from knowingly distributing through electronic means or possessing a sexually explicit image of himself, herself, or another juvenile who, as depicted in the image, is within four years of the age of the charged juvenile. The crime of misuse of a sexually explicit image of a minor is a class two misdemeanor, and if a juvenile is charged with the offense, he or she cannot be charged with the crime of sexual exploitation of a child.

It is an affirmative defense to the crime of misuse of sexually explicit images by a juvenile if the juvenile: (i) did not solicit or request the image; (ii) did not participate or encourage that making of the image; (iii) did not transmit or distribute the image to another; and (iv) took reasonable steps within 72 hours to destroy, delete or report the images.

Max Montag is a 2016 J.D. Candidate at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

Bills for Exemptions from Liquor Licensing, Rule of 7 for Children’s Code, and More Signed by Governor

On Friday, March 18, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 14 bills into law. To date, he has signed 37 bills this legislative session. The bills signed Friday include a bill conforming Children’s Code statutes to the “Rule of 7,” exemptions from liquor license requirements for institutes of higher education and home brewers, dates of performance audits for certain governmental entities, and more. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1013 – Concerning Authorizing School Districts to Purchase Crime Insurance Coverage in Lieu of Surety Bonds, by Rep. Alec Garnett and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill allows school districts to purchase crime insurance instead of surety bonds. Currently surety bonds are required for certain district employees who handle funds in excess of $50.
  • HB 16-1028 – Concerning Modifications to the Statewide Death and Disability Plan Administered by the Fire and Police Pension Association, by Rep. Kevin Van Winkle and Sen. John Cooke. The bill changes computations of fund transfers between the statewide death and disability plan and the Fire and Police Pension Association.
  • HB 16-1042 – Concerning an Exemption from Liquor Licensing Laws for a Brewing Program Offered by a State Institution of Higher Education, by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill creates an exemption from state liquor licensing laws for state institutions of higher education engaging in manufacturing and tasting of beer for teaching or research purposes. The beer cannot be sold or offered for sale and may only be tasted by students, researchers, expert tasters, and qualified employees who are at least 21 years old.
  • HB 16-1043 – Concerning the Joint Technology Committee’s Authority to Approve the Request for a Waiver of Certain Deadlines after Moneys for a Project have been Appropriated, by Rep. J. Paul Brown and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. Currently, state agencies and institutes of higher education that receive funding for projects are required to encumber some of the funds within a certain time period or, if they cannot, they are required to request a waiver. The bill exempts information technology capital projects overseen by the Joint Technology Committee from the waiver requirements.
  • HB 16-1057 – Concerning Statutorily Established Time Periods that are Multiples of Seven Days, by Rep. Kim Ransom and Sen. Michael Merrifield. The bill modifies time periods in the Children’s Code to conform to the “Rule of 7.”
  • HB 16-1081 – Concerning Removing Obsolete Reporting Provisions in Title 25.5 of the Colorado Revised Statutes, by Reps. Kim Ransom & Daneya Esgar and Sens. Kevin Lundberg and Linda Newell. The bill repeals reporting requirements for the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing for certain topics.
  • HB 16-1084 – Concerning a Modification from the Exemption from the “Colorado Liquor Code” for Home Brewers to Permit an Adult Other Than the Head of the Family to Engage in Home Brewing Activities for Personal Use Without Obtaining a Liquor License, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Chris Holbert. Currently, the head of a family can brew beer or wine for family use without obtaining a liquor license. The bill expands the allowance to any adult in the household for personal use.
  • HB 16-1086 – Concerning a Modification of the Dates on Which the Required Performance Audits of Certain Governmental Entities are Due, by Reps. Su Ryden & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill extends the deadline by which the Department of Personnel and Administration and State Personnel Board must complete an audit from December 1, 2016, to December 1, 2019. The bill also eliminates the requirement that the department and board must be audited every four years.
  • HB 16-1284 – Concerning Divestment by the Public Employees’ Retirement Association from Companies that have Economic Prohibitions Against the State of Israel, by Reps. Dan Nordberg & Dominick Moreno and Sens. Owen Hill & Leroy Garcia. The bill requires PERA to take steps to identify all companies that have economic prohibitions against Israel by January 1, 2017, and to update the list biannually thereafter. PERA is required to notify each company of its restricted status and remove companies that cease to have prohibitions within 180 days.
  • SB 16-022 – Concerning Removing Certain Limitations on the Pilot Program to Mitigate Cliff-Effect for Low Income Families who are Working and Receiving Child Care Assistance, by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Brittany Petterson. The bill removes the existing 10-county cap on counties that can participate in the Colorado Child Care Assistance Cliff Effect Pilot Program, and also removes the two-year participation requirement if the Department of Human Services determines that participation for a shorter period will provide relevant information.
  • SB 16-029 – Concerning Changes to Colorado Insurance Laws Necessary to Maintain Accreditation with the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) And, In Connection Therewith, Adopting a New Own Risk and Solvency Assessment Law (ORSA) in a Form Substantially Similar to the NAIC Model and Enhancing Colorado’s Insurance Holding Company System Law by Adding a Required NAIC Model Provision Specifying the Insurance Commissioner’s Power to Issue Subpoenas and Examine Witnesses, by Sens. Mark Scheffel & Rollie Heath and Reps. Crisanta Duran & Polly Lawrence.
  • SB 16-031 – Concerning Authority of the Director of the Office of Legislative Legal Services to Sign Vouchers for Expenditures of the Office, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Timothy Dore. Currently, the chair of the Committee on Legal Services is required to sign any voucher for OLLS expenditure. The bill allows the director of OLLS to sign vouchers that do not exceed $5,000.
  • SB 16-050 – Concerning a Hold Harmless Provision for Retailers Liable for Any Money Payable as a Result of an Incorrect Location Code Assigned by the Department of Revenue, by Sens. Tim Neville & Cheri Jahn and Reps. Lori Saine & Su Ryden. The bill releases retailers from liability for failure to collect sales tax because of a misassigned Department of Revenue location code.
  • SB 16-066 – Concerning Creation of the Contingency Reserve Fund for School Districts, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill recreates the State Contingency Reserve Fund in statute without substantive changes. The fund was mistakenly repealed on July 1, 2015.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Relinquishment-based Termination Not Allowed when Parent is Party to Dependency and Neglect Action

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of E.M. on Thursday, March 10, 2016.

Children’s Code—Dependency and Neglect—Relinquishment and Adoption— Jurisdiction.

In a question of first impression, the Court of Appeals decided that a county department of social services may not move to involuntarily terminate parental rights in a relinquishment case under article 5 of the Children’s Code when the children are the subject of a pending dependency and neglect case under article 3.

The Alamosa County Department of Human Services (department) filed a petition alleging that three children were dependent or neglected because their mother was addicted to pain pills and their father was incarcerated. The court granted temporary custody of the children to the department and placed them with relatives.

Subsequently, both parents admitted the petition’s allegations and the court adjudicated the children dependent and neglected. The court adopted a treatment plan for mother and found that no appropriate treatment plan could be devised for father.

A year after the initiation of the case, the guardian at litem (GAL) moved to terminate the parental rights of both parents under article 3. Mother relinquished her parental rights at the hearing. The department then filed three separate relinquishment cases (one for each child) under article 5. The article 3 case remained open and pending. The court terminated father’s parental rights under the relinquishment statute. At the same time, the court also issued an order establishing a new permanency planning goal and setting a review hearing in the dependency and neglect case. Father appealed the three judgments terminating his parental rights.

Father argued that the Children’s Code does not permit the department to file its termination motion in an article 5 proceeding rather than proceeding in the article 3 case. The Court agreed, holding that the dependency and neglect court maintains continuing, exclusive jurisdiction over the status of a child who is alleged to be dependent and neglected until the child reaches majority or its jurisdiction is otherwise terminated.

The Court based its holding on three grounds. First, the separate and distinct purposes of article 3 and article 5 are not well served if they are intertwined. Second, the statutes make clear that the dependency and neglect court maintains continuing, exclusive jurisdiction over any child who has been adjudicated dependent and neglected. Third, under article 3, parental rights may be terminated only through the Parent-Child Legal Relationship Termination Act of 1987, not under article 5.

The judgments were dismissed in part and reversed in part, and the case was remanded with directions.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Parental Rights Terminated As of Date of Juvenile Court’s Relinquishment Order

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Marriage of Rohrich on Thursday, March 10, 2016.

Mother’s and Father’s marriage ended in 2008. Parenting time was equally allocated and Father was ordered to pay $101 monthly in child support. In 2012, Mother relocated to South Dakota with the children, and Father’s support obligation was increased to $288 monthly. When the child support enforcement unit moved again in 2013 to modify Father’s support, the parties entered into mediation and reached an agreement that Father would relinquish his parental rights and the children would be adopted by Mother’s new husband.

In November 2013, Father petitioned the juvenile court to relinquish his parental rights, which petition was granted, and then moved in the dissolution court to terminate his child support obligation. The district court granted his motion and terminated the child support obligation as of the date Mother accepted his proposal to terminate his parental rights.

Mother appealed, arguing the district court erred in determining that Father was “effectively no longer a parent” as of the date he agreed to relinquish his parental rights and instead argued that the termination of Father’s support duty must be found under the Colorado Children’s Code. Mother alternatively contended the district court erred in retroactively terminating Father’s child support obligation under the Uniform Dissolution of Marriage Act.

The Colorado Court of Appeals agreed with both arguments. The court noted that Father’s agreement to end his rights did not terminate his child support obligation, which could only end when his rights were formally relinquished. The court also held that the district court erred in relying on the UDMA to retroactively modify Father’s support obligations, noting that because the children were spending more time with Mother, the support obligation should have been increased, not decreased.

The court of appeals reversed and remanded.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Life Without Parole Sentence for Juvenile Remanded for Montgomery Evaluation

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Wilder on Thursday, February 25, 2016.

Juvenile—First-Degree Murder—Sentence.

In accordance with the law in 1999, defendant was sentenced to mandatory life without parole based on his conviction of first-degree murder after deliberation. Defendant was a juvenile when the crime was committed.

In February 2015, the Court of Appeals reconsidered defendant’s sentence based on Miller v. Alabama, 132 S.Ct. 2455 (2012). The Court concluded that defendant’s sentence was unconstitutional, vacated the sentence, and remanded the case for an individualized determination of whether life without parole was an appropriate sentence. The Court’s decision was based on the conclusion that Miller applied retroactively.

In June 2015, the Colorado Supreme Court decided People v. Tate, 2015 CO 42, holding, among other things, that Miller did not apply retroactively. Acting on a petition for certiorari, in October 2015 the Colorado Supreme Court vacated the decision in this case and remanded for reconsideration in light of Tate. At that time, Montgomery v. Louisiana, 577 U.S. ___ (2016), was pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. The division decided to wait for the result in Montgomery before deciding defendant’s case under Tate.

The U.S. Supreme Court decided Montgomery in January 2016. The effect of Montgomery was to overrule that portion of Tate concluding that Miller should not be applied retroactively. As directed by the Colorado Supreme Court, and in light of Montgomery, the Court of Appeals reached the same result and remanded this case to the trial court, directing it to consider whether life without the possibility of parole is an appropriate sentence given defendant’s “youth and attendant characteristics.” If the trial court concludes that life without possibility of parole is unwarranted, life with the possibility of parole after 40 years is the appropriate sentence.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

e-Legislative Report: February 22, 2016

Welcome e-leg report readers to this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome. As always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions. This news report is designed to keep you up-to-date on activities at the capitol that are of interest to the bar association and to lawyers across practice areas.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings; please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

The following bills were discussed by the LPC on 2.19.16. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 16-1191 Bill Of Rights For Persons Who Are Homeless
The bill creates the “Colorado Right to Rest Act,” which establishes basic rights for persons experiencing homelessness, including, but not limited to, the right to use and move freely in public spaces without discrimination, to rest in public spaces without discrimination, to eat or accept food in any public space where food is not prohibited, to occupy a legally parked vehicle, and to have a reasonable expectation of privacy of one’s property. The bill does not create an obligation for a provider of services for persons experiencing homelessness to provide shelter or services when none are available.
The LPC considered this bill at the request of the Civil Rights Committee, but took no position on the bill.

HB 16-1110 Parent’s Bill Of Rights
The bill establishes a liberty interest and fundamental right for parents in the care, custody, and control of a parent’s child, restricting governmental entities from infringing on such interests and rights without demonstrating a compelling governmental interest that cannot be accomplished through less restrictive means.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill because it reverses the long-standing policy position of the Colorado Judicial system to act in the best interest of the child.

HB 16-1235 Commissions Evaluating State Judicial Performance
The bill makes revisions to various functions of the state commission on judicial performance (state commission) and the district commissions on judicial performance (district commission), referred to collectively as the “commissions.” The revisions include: changing the makeup of the state commission to include one representative from each judicial district to ensure representation from the entire state; establishing guidelines for when attorneys and nonattorneys are appointed to the state commission by a district commission; not allowing the chief justice to select individuals for the state commission, which reviews the chief justice’s performance; mandating annual public meetings at which the public is invited to attend and confidentially comment on justices and judges; requiring the state commission to obtain and verify required financial disclosures, criminal histories, and driving histories for each justice or judge reviewed by the commissions; requiring judicial evaluations to take place every two years and to be made public at that time; mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when a majority of commissioners determine that it is more probable than not that a justice or judge knowingly committed a dishonest act during the performance of judicial duties, knowingly made inaccurate or insufficient public financial disclosures, or was improperly influenced by a conflict of interest in performing a judicial act; and mandating that the commissions make a “do not retain” recommendation when two-thirds of the attorneys who complete a questionnaire or survey for the commission recommend that the justice or judge not be retained. The bill is funded from any fees and cost recoveries for electronic filings, network access and searches of court databases, electronic searches of court records, and any other information technology services performed pursuant to statute.
The LPC voted to oppose this bill based on the consideration that this is a longstanding and fundamental change that is not in the best interest of the administration of justice in Colorado.

SB 16-085 Uniform Trust Decanting Act
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. “Decanting” is a term used to describe the distribution of assets from one trust into a second trust. The bill enacts the “Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act” (Act), which allows a trustee to reform an irrevocable trust document within reasonable limits that ensure the trust will achieve the settlor’s original intent. The Act prevents decanting when it would defeat a charitable or tax-related purpose of the settlor.
The LPC voted to support this Uniform Bill as modified to meet the considerations of Family Law, Trust & Estate and Elder Law sections.

Updates regarding bills the CBA is currently focused on:

SB 16-013 Clean-up Office Of The Child Protection Ombudsman
Senator Newell has pulled the language of concern from the bill.  SB 13 was passed out of committee on Monday.

SB 16-043 Student Loans Consumer Protections
The CBA testified in favor of this bill, at the request of the Colorado Young Lawyers Division. The bill failed to pass out of committee.

SB 16-047 No Detention For Juveniles Who Are Truant
The CBA testified that while detention for truancy is not something the Bar supports as policy, the bill was fundamentally flawed by prohibiting the judicial branch from effecting its own valid orders. Case law from Colorado in the 1990s is directly on point to the Bar’s constitutional concerns.

SB 16-084 Uniform Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents
The Bar remains neutral on this bill, while the Health Law Section has some concerns and opposition to the language. The bill was heard in committee, but was not voted on. We are waiting for the Senate to take action on the bill.

SB 16-071 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
The CBA has not taken a position on this bill. The Department of Regulatory Affairs has some outstanding concerns that they are addressing with the Uniform Law Commission.

SB 16-088 Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Asset
This bill, as amended to accommodate both the Trust & Estate and Business Law Sections, is moving through the legislature as anticipated.

SB 16-115 Electronic Recording Technology Board
The bill, which is supported by the Bar and the Real Estate Section, has passed its first two committee hearings and now heads to Senate Appropriations.

HB 16-1051 Forms To Transfer Vehicle Ownership Upon Death
The CBA is working with the sponsors on some amendments for this bill. The bill is now in its second chamber.

HB 16-1078 Local Government Employee Whistleblower Protection
The CBA is working on this bill, which was amended and is now headed to appropriations in the House.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few new bills recently introduced. They have been sent to CBA sections for review and comment. If you have any questions about these or any other bills, please drop me a line. I’m happy to help you however I can.

HB 16-1270 Security Interest Owner’s Interest In Business Entity
Under current law, the “Uniform Commercial Code” (Code) invalidates contractual limits on the transferability of some assets that can be subject to a security interest. In 2006, the “Colorado Corporations and Associations Act” (Act) was amended to clearly and broadly exempt an owner’s interest in a business entity from these Code provisions to effectuate the “pick your partner” principle that allows small businesses to control their ownership. Section 3 of the bill narrows the exemption in the Act to that necessary for “pick your partner,” and sections 1 and 2 codify this narrowed exemption in the Code.

HB 16-1275 Taxation Of Corporate Income Sheltered In Tax Haven
The bill pertains to an affiliated group of corporations filing a combined report. In a combined report filing, the tax is based on a percentage of the entire taxable income of all of the includable corporations, but the tax is assessed only against the corporation or corporations doing business in Colorado. Including more affiliated corporations in the combined report may result in an increase in income subject to tax. There are jurisdictions located outside of the United States with no tax or very low rates of taxation, strict bank secrecy provisions, a lack of transparency in the operation of their tax system, and a lack of effective exchange of information with other countries. There are several common legal strategies for sheltering corporate income in such jurisdictions, often called “tax havens.” Notwithstanding a current requirement in state law that those corporations with 80% or more of their property and payroll assigned to locations outside of the United States be excluded from a combined report, the bill makes a corporation that is incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance an includable C corporation for purposes of the combined report. The bill defines a corporation incorporated in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance to mean any C corporation that is incorporated in a jurisdiction that has no or nominal effective tax on the relevant income and that meets one or more of five factors listed in the bill, unless it is proven to the satisfaction of the executive director of the department of revenue that such corporation is incorporated in that jurisdiction for a legitimate business purpose. The bill requires the state controller to credit a specified amount per fiscal year to the state education fund to be used to help fund public school education. The bill requires the secretary of state to submit a ballot question, to be treated as a proposition, at the statewide election to be held in November 2016 asking the voters to: increase taxes annually by the taxation of a corporation’s state income that is sheltered in a foreign jurisdiction for the purpose of tax avoidance; provide that the resulting tax revenue be used to help fund elementary and secondary public school education; and allow an estimate of the resulting tax revenue to be collected and spent notwithstanding any limitations in section 20 of article X of the state constitution (TABOR).

SB 16-131 Overseeing Fiduciaries’ Management Of Assets
The bill clarifies statutory language concerning the removal of a fiduciary to ensure that a fiduciary’s authority is suspended as soon as a petition to remove the fiduciary is filed. The bill adds a provision to the conservatorship statutes stating that an adult ward or protected person has a right to be represented by a lawyer of their choosing unless the trial court finds that the person lacks sufficient capacity to provide informed consent for representation by a lawyer. The bill states that after a fiduciary receives notice of proceedings for his, her, or its removal, the fiduciary shall not pay compensation or attorney fees and costs from the estate without an order of the court.

SB 16-133 Transfer Of Property Rights At Death
Under current law, a certificate of death, a verification of death document, or a certified copy thereof, of a person who is a joint tenant may be placed of record with the county clerk and recorder of the county in which the real property affected by the joint tenancy is located, together with a supplementary affidavit. The bill removes the requirement that the person who swears to and affirms the supplementary affidavit have no record interest in the real property. The bill includes inherited individual retirement accounts and inherited Roth individual retirement accounts as property exempt from levy and sale under writ of attachment or writ of execution. The bill, which amends provisions concerning determination-of-heirship proceedings, clarifies the definition of “interested person,” so that anyone affected by the ownership of property may commence a proceeding; describes when an unprobated will may be used as part of a proceeding; clarifies notice requirements; and ensures that a judgment and decree will convey legal title as opposed to equitable title. The bill enacts portions of section 5 of the “Uniform Power of Appointment Act,” with amendments.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Treatment Plan Must Be Appropriate to Rehabilitate Parent

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of K.B. on Thursday, February 11, 2016.

In March 2013, the Mesa County Department of Human Services opened a dependency and neglect case concerning 16-year-old K.S., 13-year-old Mi.B., 11-year-old K.B., and 9-year-old Ma.B. The Department alleged that Mother and Father fought frequently; Father yelled at the children, called them names, and physically abused them; Mi.B. had threatened one of his sisters with a knife after an argument; and K.S., who had cerebral palsy, was not receiving physical therapy she needed. Treatment plans were adopted for both Mother and Father, who was the father to the three older children. The parents’ treatment plans were amended from time to time, including requiring both parents to actively participate in individual therapy.

In August 2013, the children were removed from the parents’ home due to renewed concerns about domestic violence, and in October 2013 the deferred adjudication was converted to an order of adjudication. In December 2014, the Department filed a motion to terminate the parent-child relationships between each of the parents and the two younger children. In July 2015, after a hearing, the court granted the motion to terminate parental rights, and both parents appealed.

On appeal, Mother contended the treatment plan was not appropriate because although domestic violence was a feature of her relationship with Father from the beginning, no domestic violence counseling or treatment was ever offered to her, and she was not told to separate from Father. The court of appeals concluded further findings were required on the issue. The court noted that in order to be appropriate, a treatment plan must relate to the child’s needs and provide treatment objectives that are reasonably calculated to render a parent fit to provide adequate parenting within a reasonable time. The court noted that the fact that a treatment plan was not successful does not mean that it was not appropriate.

Both Mother and Father had expressly stipulated that their treatment plans were appropriate, and the court found that the standard for preserving a challenge to the appropriateness of a treatment plan is not clear. Mother contended that her treatment plan was inappropriate because it failed to address the domestic violence concerns. The trial court concluded Mother could not challenge the treatment plan’s appropriateness for the first time at the termination hearing, but she could challenge the reasonableness of the efforts to rehabilitate her. The trial court found that Mother’s treatment plan failed because she did not actively participate in therapy, but it did not make explicit findings as to whether the Department fulfilled its obligation to show by clear and convincing evidence that it had provided Mother with a treatment plan that was reasonably calculated to render her fit to provide adequate parenting within a reasonable time, and whether the services were appropriate to support Mother’s treatment plan but were unsuccessful in accomplishing the plan’s purpose. The court of appeals remanded for explicit findings about the reasonableness of the treatment plan and whether the services were appropriate.

The court of appeals addressed Mother’s remaining contentions on appeal because the trial court may conclude on remand that the services were appropriate. Mother contended the record did not support the trial court’s finding that she did not comply with her treatment plan. The court of appeals disagreed. Department case managers testified that Mother did not have adequate housing for her family at the end of the case, she did not progress beyond supervised visitation, and her attendance at individual therapy was very poor. The Department employees also testified that a significant concern about Mother’s sexual boundaries with the children was supposed to be addressed at individual therapy, but Mother’s attendance at therapy was “almost nonexistent.” The court of appeals noted that these findings were more than sufficient to support the trial court’s order. Mother also contended the findings were inadequate to support the trial court’s finding that she is unfit. The court of appeals again disagreed. The current case manager testified that Mother was unfit due to her poor sexual boundaries and failure to attend individual therapy, and she was unlikely to become fit due to her poor progress with the treatment plan. The court of appeals found this testimony adequate to support the trial court’s findings of unfitness, and noted that if the court finds on appeal that the treatment plan was adequate, it may reinstate the termination order.

Both parents argued the trial court failed to evaluate less drastic alternatives to termination. The court of appeals disagreed. The Department had investigated the possibility of placing Ma.B. with her paternal grandparents in Florida, but she was frightened to be separated from the rest of her family, and the grandparents never completed the screening process. No other family members were found who were willing and able placements for Ma.B. or K.B. The trial court further found that because permanency was important to both Ma.B. and K.B., continued foster care was not a viable less drastic alternative to adoption. The court of appeals found no error in the trial court’s findings. Mother also argued that termination was not in the children’s best interests, and that instead she should be given more time to comply with her treatment plan. The trial court concluded that the benefits of termination outweighed the risks, and the court of appeals found no error in this conclusion.

The court of appeals next evaluated Father’s appeal. Father contended that the Department failed to make reasonable efforts to reunite him with Ma.B. or that his treatment plan was reasonable. He argued that the trial court erred in suspending his visitations in March 2015 and in relying on that suspension to terminate his parental rights. The court of appeals disagreed. The trial court found that Father, like Mother, had only complied in part with the treatment plan but had failed to comply with the plan’s substantive requirements. Father’s parenting time with Ma.B. had been suspended due to his angry outbursts and their effect on Ma.B. He was told he needed to resume individual therapy for his visits to continue, and he did not do so. The court found the evidence sufficient to support that the Department made reasonable efforts to reunite Father and Ma.B.

The court of appeals remanded for further findings as to whether Mother’s treatment plan was adequately crafted to render her a fit parent within a reasonable time. The court affirmed on all other points.

e-Legislative Report: February 16, 2016

Welcome e-leg report readers to this week’s installment of the world under the Gold Dome. As always, we welcome your feedback, thoughts, comments and questions. This news report is designed to keep you up to date on activities at the capitol that are of interest to the bar association and to lawyers across practice areas.

Feel free to drop me a line on how we are doing or raise an issue on a piece of legislation. Contact me at jschupbach@cobar.org.

CBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association. Members are welcome to attend the meetings; please RSVP if you are interested.

LPC Meeting Update

The following bills were discussed by the LPC. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 16-1078 Local Government Employee Whistleblower Protection
The bill prohibits a county, municipality, or local education provider from imposing any disciplinary action against an employee on account of the employee’s statements to any person about the local government that the employee reasonably believes to show: a violation of a state or federal law, a local ordinance or resolution, or a local education provider policy; a waste or misuse of public funds; fraud; an abuse of authority; mismanagement; or a danger to the health or safety of students, employees, or the public. The bill permits an employee to file a written complaint with the office of administrative courts, for referral to an administrative law judge, alleging that a local government has imposed disciplinary action that violates this prohibition and seeking injunctive relief and damages. Employees who lose the administrative hearing may file a civil action in district court. The employee protection does not apply if the disclosure was false or made with reckless disregard for the truth or falsity thereof, or if it was of a protected public record or confidential information that was not reasonably necessary to show one or more of the identified circumstances. Administrative law judges are given jurisdiction to hear, determine, and make findings and awards on all these whistleblower cases. The director of the office of administrative courts is required to establish rules to govern these proceedings and hearings.
The LPC voted on the recommendation and request of the Government Counsel and Labor & Employment Law sections to oppose the bill.

HB 16-1154 Employer Definition Clarify Franchisee Status
The bill clarifies that the definition of “employer” only includes a person who possesses authority to control an employee’s terms and conditions of employment and actually exercises that authority directly. The bill specifies that a franchisor is not considered an employer of a franchisee’s employees unless a court finds that a franchisor exercises a type or degree of control over the franchisee or the franchisee’s employees not customarily exercised by a franchisor for the purpose of protecting the franchisor’s trademarks and brand.
The LPC voted to support the bill on the recommendation and presentation of the Franchise subsection of Business Law section.

HB 16-1232 Sunset DOR Private Letter Ruling & General Information Letter
Currently, the executive director of the department of revenue (department), or the executive director’s designee, is charged with issuing, on written request from a taxpayer, private letter rulings (binding determinations regarding the tax consequences of a proposed or completed transaction), and Information letters (nonbinding statements providing general information regarding any tax administered by the department). This duty is currently scheduled to sunset on September 1, 2016. The bill continues the requirement of the department to issue these letters until September 1, 2023. The bill also specifies that the department must track the total state full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel positions necessary and the hours dedicated by each FTE for the issuance, declination, modification, or revocation of all information letters or private letter rulings.
The LPC voted to support the bill and testify in favor of continuing the practice. The bill will be heard in committee next week.

SB 16-115 Electronic Recording Technology Board
The bill creates the electronic recording technology board (board) in the department of state. The board, which is authorized to issue revenue bonds, is established as an enterprise. So long as it constitutes an enterprise, the board is not subject to any provisions of section 20 of article X of the state constitution. The board sunsets in 6 years, but prior to that sunset, it is subject to a sunset review. The board is authorized to impose a surcharge of up to $2 on all documents that a clerk and recorder receives for recording or filing. If imposed, counties are required to collect the surcharge on behalf of the board and transmit it to the state treasurer for deposit in the newly created electronic recording technology fund (fund). The board is required to: develop a strategic plan incorporating the core goals of security, accuracy, sequencing, online public access, standardization, and preservation of public records; determine functionality standards for an electronic filing system that support the core goals; issue a request for proposal for electronic filing system equipment and software that will be available to counties on an optional basis; develop best practices for an electronic filing system; provide training to clerks and recorders related to electronic filing systems; and make grants to counties to establish, maintain, improve, or replace electronic filing systems for documents that are recorded with a clerk and recorder. In awarding grants, the board is required to give priority for grants to counties that do not have sufficient revenue from the surcharge proceeds to maintain their existing electronic filing systems. The money in the fund is continuously appropriated to the board to be used for these purposes. The bill repeals the secretary of state’s powers to ensure uniformity related to electronic filing systems, which powers become the board’s responsibility, and requires the department of state to prepare an annual report that is published online about the grants that the board made in the prior fiscal year. The bill also extends the one-dollar surcharge that a county clerk and recorder is currently required to collect and use for the county’s core or electronic filing system for 9.5 years. The definition of “electronic filing system” is expanded to include elements of the “core filing system,” which term is repealed.
The LPC voted on the recommendation of the Real Estate Section, which has been involved with the creation and drafting of the bill, to support the bill and testify in favor of its passage in committee.

SB 16-043 Student Loans Consumer Protections
The bill prohibits a private educational lender, as defined in the bill, from offering gifts to a covered educational institution, as defined in the bill, including public and private institutions of higher education, in exchange for any advantage or consideration related to loan activities or from engaging in revenue sharing. Further, the bill prohibits persons employed at covered educational institutions from receiving anything of  value from private educational lenders. The bill makes it unlawful for a private educational lender to impose a fee or penalty on a borrower for early repayment or prepayment of a private education loan and requires a lender to disclose any agreements made with a card issuer or creditor for purposes of marketing a credit card. The bill requires private educational lenders to disclose information to a potential borrower or borrower both at the time of application for a private education loan and at the time of consummation of the loan. The required disclosures are described in the bill and include, among other disclosures, the interest rate for the loan and adjustments to the rate, potential finance charges and penalties, payment options, an estimate of the total amount for repayment at the interest rate, the possibility of qualifying for federal loans, the terms and conditions of the loan, and that the borrower may cancel the loan, without penalty, within 3 business days after the date on which the loan is consummated.
The LPC voted to support this bill and to authorize the Juvenile Law section to testify in its favor in committee. This bill would help graduating lawyers, and future graduates, with the debt burden of school.

SB 16-084 Uniform Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill adopts, with amendments, the “Uniform Recognition of Substitute Health Care Decision-making Documents Act” as Colorado law. The bill establishes the circumstances under which a substitute health care decision-making document (document) is valid in this state. A person may assume in good faith that a document is genuine, valid, and still in effect and that the decision-maker’s authority is genuine, valid, and still in effect. A person who is asked to accept a document shall do so within a reasonable amount of time. The person may not require an additional or different form of document for authority granted in the document presented. A person who refuses to accept a document is subject to a court order mandating acceptance of the document and liability for reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in an action or proceeding that mandates acceptance of the document. A person is not required to accept a document under certain described conditions.
The LPC voted to remain neutral on the bill, while authorizing the Health Law section to testify as to the specific concerns it raised in the context of medical practices.

SB 16-047 No Detention For Juveniles Who Are Truant
The bill prohibits a juvenile detention facility from receiving or providing care for a juvenile who violates a court order to attend school unless the juvenile is also adjudicated for a delinquent act and remains under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for committing the delinquent act.
The LPC is concerned that the bill, by precluding a court from enforcing its own orders, is likely unconstitutional, and does not allow the judicial branch to complete the requirements and reports that were created by SB 15-184.

SB 16-103 Canadian Domestic Violence Protection Order Enforcement
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill enacts the “Uniform Recognition and Enforcement of Canadian Domestic Violence Protection Orders Act” as recommended by the national conference of commissioners on uniform state laws. The bill allows a peace officer to enforce a Canadian domestic violence protection order. The bill allows a court to enter an order enforcing or refusing to enforce a Canadian domestic violence protection order. The bill provides immunity for a person who enforces a Canadian domestic violence protection order.
The LPC voted to support this bill on the recommendation of the Family Law section.

Updates regarding bills the CBA is currently focused on:

HB 16-1145 Documentary Fee For Residential Real Property
The CBA was able to propose an amendment to the bill that moved us to “neutral” on this bill. It will be heard in committee this week.

SB 16-013 Clean-up Office Of The Child Protection Ombudsman
This sponsor has agreed to remove the language that the CBA was concerned about. With this amendment, the CBA can officially monitor the bill going forward.

SB 16-071 Revised Uniform Athlete Agents Act 2015
The LPC asked that this bill be reviewed for comment by the Lawyers Professional Liability Committee. Once that review is complete, the LPC will revisit the act.

SB 16-088 Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access To Digital Asset Act
The CBA voted to support the bill as written and is monitoring the bill for any additional amendments that may impact it.

New Bills of Interest

These are a few new bills recently introduced. They have been sent to CBA sections for review and comment. If you have any questions about these or any other bills, please drop me a line. I’m happy to help you however I can.

SB 16-120 Review By Medicaid Client For Billing Fraud
The bill requires the department of health care policy and financing (department), by a certain date, to develop and implement an explanation of benefits for medicaid recipients. The purpose of the explanation of benefits is to inform a medicaid client of a claim for reimbursement made for services provided to the client or on his or her behalf, so that the client may discover and report administrative or provider errors or fraudulent claims for reimbursement. The bill specifies certain information that must be included in the explanation of benefits. Specifically, the explanation of benefits must include information regarding at least one method for a medicaid client to report errors in the explanation of benefits. The department shall work with medicaid clients and medicaid advocates to develop an explanation of benefits and educational materials that are understandable to medicaid clients. The explanation of benefits must be sent to clients not less than bimonthly, and the department shall determine the most cost-effective means for producing and distributing the explanation of benefits, which means may include e-mail or distribution with existing communications to clients.

HB 16-1258 Court Clerks Posting Of Service
Under current law, if a respondent in a domestic relations action cannot be personally served and is served by publication, the clerk of the court is required to post a copy of the process on a bulletin board in his or her office for 35 days after the date of publication. The bill gives the clerk the option of posting the service online on the court’s website rather than on a bulletin board.

HB 16-1261 Retail Marijuana Sunset
Sunset Process—House Finance Committee. The bill implements the following recommendations from the sunset report for the retail marijuana program: extending the retail marijuana code until September 1, 2019; stating that regulation of labeling, packaging, and testing is a matter of statewide concern; and repealing the following provisions from the retail marijuana code: the requirement that a licensee post a surety bond as condition of licensure; the requirement that the executive director deny a license based on a previous denial at the same location; the proscription on the placement and sale of marijuana-themed magazines; and the authority to promulgate rules prohibiting misrepresentation and unfair practices. The bill creates two new retail marijuana licenses, a retail marijuana transport license and a retail marijuana operator license, and gives the state licensing authority rulemaking authority over those licenses. The bill conforms language in the retail marijuana code to language in the medical marijuana code related to mandatory testing, the confidentiality of licensee information, and limited access areas.