February 19, 2017

Colorado Court of Appeals: Hail in Window Wells Retained Character as Surface Water for Insurance Purposes

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Martinez v. American Family Mutual Insurance Co. on Thursday, February 9, 2017.

Michael Martinez owned a home in Erie, Colorado. On August 3, 2013, a heavy rain and hail storm caused hail to collect in the window wells for his basement windows, and eventually the rain and hail overflowed into his basement windows, causing extensive damage. Martinez filed a claim with American Family, but the insurance company denied his claim after investigation, finding that the damage was caused by “flooding” or “surface water,” both of which were excluded under the insurance policy.

Martinez filed suit, seeking a declaratory judgment on the issue of coverage and asserting claims for contractual and extra-contractual damages. American Family moved for summary judgment on the issue of coverage, arguing that the insurance policy’s water damage exclusions for “flood” and “surface water” applied as a matter of law. The district court granted American Family’s motion, and Martinez appealed.

On appeal, Martinez raised two contentions: (1) the damage to his basement was not caused by “surface water” because the water that collected on his roof and melted hail did not fit the definition of surface water; and (2) even if the water was surface water, it lost that characteristic when it entered his window wells. The court of appeals disagreed on both counts. The court of appeals first evaluated the Colorado Supreme Court opinion in Heller v. Fire Insurance Exchange, 800 P.2d 1006 (Colo. 1990). The court found that the supreme court’s definition of surface water in Heller fit squarely with the issues raised by Martinez, although the facts in Heller differed significantly from those alleged by Martinez.

The court of appeals determined that the water on Martinez’s roof was unquestionably surface water, noting that dwellings were reasonably considered extensions of the earth’s surface. Likewise, melted hail was well within the definition of surface water. The court next evaluated Martinez’s claim that the water in his window wells lost its characteristic as surface water, and disagreed. The window wells were designed to retain the surrounding soil and allow water to drain, therefore they were reasonably considered extensions of the surface and did not transform the collected water into a different type of body of water.

The court of appeals affirmed the trial court’s entry of summary judgment in favor of American Family.

HB 17-1162: Repealing Drivers’ License Penalties for Unpaid Court Judgment

On February 6, 2017, Rep. Matt Gray introduced HB 17-1162, “Concerning Action that Can be Taken Against an Individual Based on the Individual’s Failure to Pay for a Traffic Violation.”

Under current law, an individual who is cited for certain traffic infractions must either pay the penalty assessment or appear in court for a hearing. If the individual neither pays the infraction nor appears for a hearing, the court must issue a judgment against the individual. An individual who has an outstanding judgment:

  • May have their driver’s license canceled;
  • May not receive a new driver’s license; and
  • May not renew a current driver’s license.

The bill repeals these penalties and provides courts with the option of withholding a driver’s state income tax refund in order to satisfy the outstanding judgment.

The bill was introduced in the House and assigned to the Judiciary Committee.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Essential Element of Abuse of Process Claim is Improper Use of Courts

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Active Release Techniques, LLC v. Xtomic, LLC on Thursday, February 9, 2017.

Active Release Techniques (ART) is a provider of training, seminars, and business support software for chiropractors and other health care providers. ART contracted with Xtomic to manage ART’s IT services and provide support. When one of ART’s employees started a new business, Select Seminar Services, LLC (S3), with a co-owner of Xtomic, ART petitioned for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction. It also initiated the current litigation, asserting claims for misappropriation of trade secrets. Xtomic responded by asserting numerous counterclaims, including a claim for abuse of process. A jury ultimately decided all claims in Xtomic’s favor.

ART appealed, arguing the trial court erred by denying its motion for a directed verdict on Xtomic’s abuse of process claim. The court of appeals noted that “a valid abuse of process claim must allege ‘(1) an ulterior purpose for the use of a judicial proceeding; (2) willful action in the use of that process which is not proper in the regular course of the proceedings, i.e., use of a legal proceeding in an improper manner; and (3) resulting damage.'” In this case, ART moved for a directed verdict on the abuse of process claim at the close of evidence on the counterclaims. Xtomic argued that ART knew from the outset that it had no legitimate claims against Xtomic and the overly aggressive manner in which it pursued its claims against Xtomic was evidence of ART’s ulterior motive to use the lawsuit as a means to harass Xtomic and run it out of business. In denying ART’s motion for directed verdict, the court relied on ART’s pretrial settlement with Xtomic, ART’s reputation for filing lawsuits to control the behavior of former 5 associates and business partners, and the nature and number of preservation letters that ART sent to numerous individuals.

The court of appeals disagreed with the trial court that the settlement could be evidence of ART’s willful misuse of judicial process, because settlement does not imply that the originally filed suit was improper. The court also disregarded the evidence of ART’s other lawsuits, finding that it was only proper to focus on the instant case. Finally, the court found that the preservation letters were not directly related to any litigation but rather were issued in response to ART’s concern that Xtomic was destroying emails.

The court of appeals denied Xtomic’s motion for appellate attorney fees, since it was not the prevailing party. The court reversed the trial court’s denial of ART’s motion for directed verdict and remanded.

Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure Amended in First Rule Change of 2017

On Monday, January 23, 2017, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced Rule Change 2017(01), effective January 12, 2017. Rule Change 2017(01) amends several rules of the Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure. The changes to Rules 17, 40, 60, 122, 305.5, and 121 §§ 1-14, 1-19, 1-23, and 1-26, as well as the changes to JDF 1111, are effective immediately. The changes to Rules 33, 103, 403, Form 20, and forms accompanying 103 and 403, are effective March 1, 2017.

The changes to Rule 33 affect pattern interrogatories and responses. The changes are quite extensive. A comment was added to Rule 33 to explain

[1] Pattern interrogatories [Form 20, pursuant to C.R.C.P. 33(e)] have been modified to more appropriately conform to the 2015 amendments to C.R.C.P. 16, 26, and 33. A change to or deletion of a pre-2017 pattern interrogatory should not be construed as making that former interrogatory improper, but instead, only that the particular interrogatory is, as of the effective date of the 2017 rule change, modified as stated or no longer a “pattern interrogatory.”

[2] The change to C.R.C.P. 33(e) is made to conform to the holding of Leaffer v. Zarlengo, 44 P.3d 1072 (Colo. 2002).

Rules 103 and 403 were amended to conform dates to the “Rule of 7” and to provide clarification regarding garnishments. The changes to Rules 103 and 403 are substantially similar. Forms 26, 28, 29, 31, 32, and 33 were also amended. The jurat or Return of Service was removed from each form, and other changes were made to conform to the changes to Rules 103 and 403.

Rule 17 was amended to remove reference to “a married woman.” A citation was updated in Rule 41. Rule 60 was updated to conform to the “Rule of 7.” Section 1-14 of Rule 121 was amended to update the citation to the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and update the date of the comment. A citation was also updated in Rule 121, § 1-19, and a date was added to the comment.

Rule 121, § 1-23 was amended to add a paragraph (7) regarding bonding over liens. The new paragraph reads:

7. Bonding over a Lien. If a money judgment has been made a lien upon real estate by the filing of a transcript of the judgment record by the judgment creditor, the lien shall be released upon the motion of the judgment debtor or other interested party if a bond for the money judgment has been approved and filed as provided in this section 1-23. The order of the court releasing the lien may be recorded with the clerk and recorder of the county where the property is located. Once the order is recorded, all proceedings by the judgment creditor to enforce the judgment lien shall be discontinued, unless a court orders otherwise.

The comment to § 1-23 was amended to add a date and paragraph numbering. The changes to § 1-26 of Rule 121 also add dates and numbers to the comment, and a new 2017 comment was added to § 1-26.

The amendments to Rule 305.5 also add dates and numbers to the comments, and a new 2017 comment was added regarding the name of the court-authorized e-filing service provider. Rule 122 was changed to update contact information requirements for appointed judges, and to remove language from the affirmation.

JDF 1111, the Sworn Financial Statement, was updated to remove language from the Certificate of Service regarding simultaneous filing of JDF 1104.

A redline of Rule Change 2017(01) is available here. For all the court’s adopted and proposed Rule Changes, click here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Tractor is Motor Vehicle for Underinsured Motorist Coverage Purposes

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Smith v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Insurance—Covered Motor Vehicle—Underinsured Motorist Provision—Farm Tractor.

Bunker was driving a farm tractor when he collided with Smith’s truck. The hay spears attached to the tractor pierced the truck and impaled Smith, leaving him severely injured. Bunker pleaded guilty to careless driving, and Smith settled his claim against Bunker for Bunker’s liability policy limits. Because this settlement did not fully compensate Smith for his injuries, he filed a claim for underinsured motorist benefits (UIM) with State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. (State Farm). State Farm denied coverage on the basis that a farm tractor is not a motor vehicle. Smith sued and the district court dismissed the complaint, finding that the tractor was not a covered motor vehicle for purposes of the UIM coverage policy.

On appeal, Smith contended that his policy’s property damage coverage section definition of “uninsured motor vehicle” is included in the UIM coverage provision. The Colorado Court of Appeals declined to extend the “uninsured motor vehicle” definition found only in the property damage coverage provision beyond that provision.

Smith next contended that the plain and ordinary meaning of “motor vehicle” includes the tractor. The court determined that the plain and ordinary meaning is an automotive vehicle not operated on rails and one with rubber tires for use on highways. Applying this definition, the court found that the tractor had wheels and its own motor, was not operated on rails, and was designed for use on streets and highways. Therefore, it was a covered motor vehicle under Smith’s UIM coverage provision.

The judgment was reversed and the case was remanded.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Terms of Settlement Offer were Valid and Enforceable When Accepted

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Kovac v. Farmers Insurance Exchange on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Personal Injury—Underinsured Motorist—Statute of Limitations—Summary Judgment.

Kovac was seriously injured in a car accident with Filipelli. It was undisputed that Filipelli was at fault. Kovac’s medical expenses exceeded $1.4 million. Filipelli was covered by Shelter Insurance Company (Shelter) with a liability limit of $100,000. Kovac was insured under two different automobile policies with Farmers Insurance Exchange (Farmers).

Kovac settled with Shelter for its policy limits. Later, Farmers offered to settle Kovac’s remaining claims for $80,000, but the parties could not reach a settlement. Kovac sued Farmers on April 3, 2015 for recovery of UIM benefits, tortious bad faith breach of contract, and unreasonable delay and denial of insurance benefits. Farmers moved for summary judgment on the grounds that the Shelter settlement check was tendered to Kovac’s attorney on April 2, 2013 and the statute of limitations therefore ran on April 2, 2015. The district court agreed and dismissed the suit.

On appeal, Kovac argued that although her attorney received the check and settlement offer on April 2, it was not accepted until April 5 when the release was signed and the check endorsed. Therefore, the statute of limitations ran on April 5, 2015 and her complaint was timely filed on April 3, 2015. C.R.S. § 13-80-107.5(b) provides that the statute of limitations runs two years from the date when the insured “received payment of the settlement” on the underlying bodily injury claim. The court of appeals determined that Kovac released her claims against Filipelli on April 5, 2013.  Therefore the statute of limitations had not run when she filed her complaint against Farmers.

The summary judgment was reversed and the case was remanded.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Denial of Attorney Fees Not Error in Close Case with No Vexatious, Groundless Claims

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Estate of Fritzler on Thursday, January 12, 2017.

Wills—Business Records Exception—Jury Instruction—Presumption of Undue Influence—Attorney Fees—Costs.

Fritzler and his wife executed numerous wills during the last 10 years of their lives. The last will was drafted just a few years before they each passed away. In all of the wills, the Fritzlers sought to distribute their farm in a generally equitable manner among their five children, but the last will increased son Glen’s portion over son Steven’s portion. Steven contested the will, contending that Glen unduly influenced Fritzler. After a lengthy trial, a jury concluded that the will was valid. Following the verdict, the estate and the personal representative (PR) sought attorney fees and costs. The court denied the award of fees, finding that the case was “close” and Steven did not lack substantial justification. The court partially denied costs, concluding that it lacked equitable authority to grant fees without concurrent statutory authority.

On appeal, Steven contended that the trial court abused its discretion by excluding Fritzler’s hospital medical records because they were admissible under the business records exception. Although the exclusion was an abuse of discretion, any error was harmless because the records were cumulative of other admitted evidence.

Steven also contended that the trial court erred by refusing to instruct the jury on the presumption of undue influence. However, the PR offered sufficient evidence to rebut this presumption. Thus it would have been improper for the court to instruct the jury thereon.

The PR contended that the trial court erred by denying her request for attorney fees under C.R.S. § 13-17-102 and by denying her certain costs as the prevailing party under C.R.C.P. 54(d). The trial court noted that this was a close case and found that even though Steven did not prevail, his claims were not groundless, frivolous, or vexatious. Therefore, the court did not err by denying the request for fees. As to the costs, the trial court awarded most of the requested costs to the PR after a hearing, denying only some that it found to be unreasonable. Therefore, the court did not err in its award of costs.

The judgment and orders were affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: District Court Must Take Active Role in Managing Discovery Request of Non-Party in Dissolution Proceeding

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in In re Marriage of Gromicko on Monday, January 9, 2017.

In 2015, Lisa Dawn Gromicko (Wife) filed a petition for dissolution of marriage, naming Nickifor Nicholas Gromicko (Husband) as respondent. The petition requested equitable division of marital assets and debts. In order to evaluate Husband’s income, Wife requested records from Husband’s employer, InterNACHI, a nonprofit organized as a § 501(c)(6) trade association. Although Husband initially stated he would not object to the production of certain records, he did not provide them, and Wife requested a status conference. Husband’s counsel, who was also InterNACHI’s general counsel, filed a motion in response to Wife’s discovery request, arguing (1) the only InterNACHI relevant to the divorce proceeding were those reflecting Husband’s compensation and expense reimbursements; (2) the court could not consider InterNACHI a marital asset because Wife did not allege grounds in her dissolution petition to pierce the corporate veil; and (3) the court could authorize Wife to serve a subpoena duces tecum on InterNACHI to produce the relevant documents. The court held the status conference but did not rule on the discovery issues.

Wife then served a subpoena duces tecum on InterNACHI requesting (1) Husband’s employment and compensation; (2) the employment by InterNACHI of any person related to Husband; (3) InterNACHI’s bookkeeping, accounting, and tax return or Form 990 preparation; and (4) InterNACHI’s conflict-of-interest policy. InterNACHI moved to quash the subpoena, arguing that many of the requested documents were privileged, confidential, and irrelevant to the dissolution proceeding. InterNACHI also renewed its motion that Wife did not allege any grounds sufficient to claim that InterNACHI was Husband’s alter ego and pierce the corporate veil. The court denied InterNACHI’s motion to quash, and it filed a C.A.R. 21 interlocutory appeal.

On appeal, InterNACHI argued that the district court abused its discretion in refusing to quash or modify Wife’s subpoena because (1) Wife was required to, but did not, plead in her dissolution petition a claim for piercing InterNACHI’s corporate veil and (2) certain of Wife’s discovery requests were irrelevant to her veil-piercing claim and thus were outside the scope of discovery permitted by C.R.C.P. 26. The court first analyzed the discovery requirements in domestic relations cases, which are governed by C.R.C.P. 16.2, and found that Wife was not required to plead in her dissolution petition a claim seeking to pierce InterNACHI’s corporate veil. However, the supreme court concluded the district court did not use the correct standard in evaluating InterNACHI’s objection to the requested discovery.

The court compared C.R.C.P. 16.2 to the discovery requirements in civil cases, governed by C.R.C.P. 26. The court found the two rules analogous. The court found that its holding in DCP Midstream, LP v. Anadarko Petroleum Corp., 2013 CO 36, applied in this case and required the district court to take an active role in managing discovery. The supreme court found that the district court should initially have granted Wife only such discovery as would reasonably have been necessary to allow her to attempt to establish the existence of the alter ego relationship that she claimed. The supreme court noted that if, after receiving limited discovery, Wife could prove that InterNACHI was Husband’s alter ego, she may then be entitled to receive the information in her initial request, but the court must actively monitor discovery pursuant to DCP Midstream.

The supreme court made its rule to show cause absolute and returned the case to the district court for further proceedings.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Exculpatory Clauses in Fitness Agreement Did Not Bar PLA Claim

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Stone v. Life Time Fitness, Inc. on Thursday, December 30, 2016.

Summary Judgment—Negligence—Premises Liability Act—Liability Release—Assumption of Risk.

Stone was a member of a fitness club owned by defendants (collectively, Life Time). She fell and fractured her ankle in the club’s women’s locker room after a workout. Stone asserted a general negligence claim and a claim under Colorado’s Premises Liability Act (PLA), alleging that Life Time allowed a trip hazard and dangerous condition to exist and thus failed to exercise reasonable care.

Life Time moved for summary judgment, relying on assumption of risk and liability release language contained in the agreement Stone signed when she joined the club. The district court granted the motion, without distinguishing between the negligence and PLA claims, finding that the agreement was valid and enforceable and that Stone had released Life Time from all the claims asserted in the complaint.

On appeal, Stone contended that the district court erred in entering summary judgment and dismissing her action. As to the negligence claim, the Court of Appeals determined that the PLA provides the sole remedy for injuries against landowners on their property and abrogates common law negligence claims against landowners. Thus Stone could not bring a common law negligence claim against Life Time.

Stone also argued that the exculpatory clauses in the agreement, while applying to the workout areas, did not clearly and unambiguously apply to injuries incurred in the women’s locker room. Exculpatory agreements are generally disfavored. A court must consider four factors to determine whether an exculpatory agreement is valid: (1) the existence of a duty to the public; (2) the nature of the service performed; (3) whether the contract was fairly entered into; and (4) whether the intention of the parties was expressed in clear and unambiguous language. As to the first factor, the Colorado Supreme Court has specified that no public duty is implicated if a business provides recreational services. On the second factor, courts have consistently held that recreational services are neither essential nor a matter of practical necessity. With respect to the third factor, recreational service contracts of this type are generally considered to be fairly entered into. These three factors weighed in favor of the enforceability of the agreement. On the fourth prong, however, in waiving future negligence claims, the intention of the parties must be expressed in clear and unambiguous language. After scrutinizing the exculpatory clauses, the court of appeals concluded that the agreement used excessive legal jargon, was unnecessarily complex, and created a likelihood of confusion. Thus, the agreement did not bar Stone’s PLA claim.

The judgment on the negligence claim was affirmed, the judgment on the PLA claim was reversed, and the case was remanded.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Top Ten Programs and Homestudies of 2016: Litigation

The year is drawing to a close, which means that the compliance period is ending for a third of Colorado’s attorneys. Still missing some credits? Don’t worry, CBA-CLE has got you covered.

Today on Legal Connection, we are featuring the Top Ten Litigation Programs and Homestudies. Litigation encompasses several practice areas, including commercial litigation, tort/insurance, civil litigation, and more, but some things are common to all trial attorneys. CBA-CLE offers many great programs for litigators, and our litigation library contains both helpful treatises and reference guides. Find the program, homestudy, or book you need at cle.cobar.org/Books/Litigation.

And now, for the Top Ten Litigation Programs and Homestudies of 2016.

10. Expert Witness Introduction for Colorado Practitioners: Top 10 Tips
This CLE covers key basics of Colorado expert witness practice: who is an expert witness (CRE 702);  what are the requirements of being an expert (CRE 702); when may an expert witness testify (CRE 702); what are the discovery requirements applicable to expert witnesses (CRCP 26(a)(2)(B); what is the timing for required disclosure of expert witnesses (CRCP 26(a)(2)(C) and the sanctions for failing to disclose expert witnesses properly and timely (CRCP 37(c)(1))? This CLE will be based on Colorado law, but will present a comparison to federal law, and identify key federal cases under analogous Rules where Colorado law is absent. Order the Video OnDemand here and the MP3 here. Available for 1 general credit.

9. Making Your Record: The Why, When, and How of Appellate Advocacy in Trial Court
Learn how to “make your record” in state and federal court to preserve your issue on appeal in the Pre-trial, Trial, and Post Trial phases. Attorney Kendra Beckwith will cover Pleadings, Pre-Trial Motions, Discovery Disputes, Trial Objections and Motions, Jury Instructions and Verdict Forms, Post-Trial Motions, and Notice of Appeal. Order the Video OnDemand here and the MP3 here. Available for 1 general credit.

8. Deposition Practice: Nuts and Bolts
You will leave this half-day program immediately prepared to plan and implement more effective depositions. This is a skills building program that covers every aspect of the deposition process, filled with tips on questions that will draw out information, obtain admissions, support motion practice and set up successful cross examination at trial. You will also learn how to prepare your witness to be deposed, conveying information truthfully while avoiding manipulation. Your seasoned presenter and litigator has extensive knowledge and experience, and will provide you with invaluable pointers and information. Trial lawyers of all experience levels will pick up tips, ideas, and insights. This program is about the art as well as the science of discovery practice. Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 3 general credits.

7. Direct & Cross Examination and Opening & Closing: Top To-Dos
You know from many a sleepless night and anxious day that your examinations of witnesses, and your openings and closings at trial must be independently effective and collectively coordinate as part of a winning strategy. The best part is that you don’t have to change your style and personality to develop the skills to become more effective in court! This program will be full of tips, methods and suggestions about how to build immediately on your abilities as a litigator to be that much more effective and persuasive right now in your trial practice. This program will help you be a better trial lawyer now and set you on the path to be an even better lawyer as you continue to work on what you will learn in this program. Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 3 general credits.

6. New Technology for Evidence Preservation: Drones, Black Boxes, and More
Drones, computers in vehicles, and Event Data Recorders (EDRs) have evolved in popularity and sophistication. This program will focus on data to be collected and preserved following an accident, including physical data, electronic data, and photographs. In addition, there will be a review of some of the ethical issues involved including the use of investigators, data collected, and privacy issues.  Relevant Case law and the Colorado Rules of Professional Conduct will be referenced. Order the Video OnDemand here and the MP3 here. Available for 2 general credits.

5. Courtroom Technology & Voir Dire
If you are a litigator, you are always looking for ways to gain the edge in the courtroom: with the judge, with the jury, and with opposing counsel. From pre-trial discovery and depositions through jury instructions and closing argument, every step is vital to winning your case. Watch this half-day homestudy on courtroom technology and voir dire that will give you the edge in your next case. Find out the latest in courtroom technology, voir dire tips, and hear the fascinating case study of the voir dire in the Oklahoma City bombing case! Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 3 general credits.

4. Preparing the Case for Trial: Motions, Mock Trials, and Motions In Limine
This program explains the benefits of mock trials, including how to prepare for a mock trial and what you will learn; motions practice and oral advocacy, including organization and presentation of arguments, how to interact with the judge, how to handle questions, and how to effectively implement oral persuasion skills; and Schreck challenges and motions in limine, including laying the foundation for admission or striking of expert testimony, the different standards for Schreck challenges and Daubert motions, and how to make effective motions in limine. Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 3 general credits.

3. E-Discovery 2016
Law and technology intersect on a continuing – and accelerating – basis.  Attorneys in all areas of practice must become familiar with new electronic devices and the media through which they and their clients communicate and conduct business.  At the same time, existing state and federal rules that govern civil and criminal proceedings and the Rules of Professional Conduct must address technologies such as social media, webpages, and shared work places.  Electronic information impacts all aspects of an attorney’s practice, whether litigation, transactional, or otherwise. For example, electronically stored information affects all employers and information governance professionals.  This program is a must-attend for any attorney practicing today and tomorrow. Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 8 general credits, including 1 ethics credit.

2. Collecting Judgments: Strategies for Success
This program presents a practical approach to maximizing your ability to collect judgments within the bounds of the law and ethics rules. Your expert faculty will guide you through the process and let you know the options that are available. They will tell you how, when, and why to select one strategy over another. In addition, you receive a primer on the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act and the perspective of the court. Learn the dos and don’ts of effective and ethical collections practice. Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 6 general credits and 1 ethics credit.

1. Winning at Trial 2016: Practical Pointers
This is your annual one day trial advocacy program presented by the Colorado Chapter of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Its distinguished faculty are highly experienced litigators and strategists who will share with you practical pointers for winning your clients’ cases. Topics include Jury Selection, Creating Trial Themes and Graphics, Taking Depositions, Opening Statement, Direct Examination, Cross Examination, and Social Media. Don’t Miss This Opportunity to Learn from Those Who Know Trial Law Inside and Out! Order the Video OnDemand here, the CD homestudy here, and the MP3 here. Available for 7 general credits.

Jury Selection in a High-Profile Death Penalty Case

On April 19, 1995, a Ryder truck filled with explosives parked outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and detonated. The blast damaged 324 buildings in a 16-block radius, 168 people were killed in the attack, and 680 were injured. Many of the deceased were children; an “America’s Kids” child care center was inside the federal building, and 15 of the 21 infants and children at the child care center were killed.

Approximately 80 minutes after the attack, Timothy McVeigh was pulled over for a missing registration tag on his 1970s yellow Mercury. When the officer stopped McVeigh’s vehicle, McVeigh got out of the car and the officer could see the outline of a gun under his jacket. McVeigh admitted he had the weapon and it was loaded, and the trooper arrested him and booked him into jail. Within days of the attack, the Ryder truck was linked to McVeigh and his friend Terry Nichols, McVeigh’s Army buddy.

McVeigh and Nichols were charged with eleven counts: (1) conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction; (2) use of a weapon of mass destruction; (3) destruction by explosive related to the Murrah building; and (4) through (11) first degree murder, for the deaths of seven federal law enforcement officers who died in the Murrah building. McVeigh and Nichols were tried separately.

Both defendants moved to disqualify the federal judge presiding over the case. Only Nichols appealed for mandamus from the denial; the Tenth Circuit found that because the judge’s own chambers were destroyed in the blast, it would be difficult for the judge to be fair and impartial. Venue was moved in Nichols’ case to Colorado.

N. Reid Neureiter represented Nichols in his death penalty case. He faced many difficult issues in jury selection and during trial. On Wednesday, December 21, 2016, he will discuss the case and the voir dire issues as part of a half-day program, “Courtroom Technology and Voir Dire.” To register, call (303) 860-0608 or click the links below.

 

CLELogo

CLE Program: Courtroom Technology and Voir Dire

This CLE presentation will occur on December 21, 2016, at the CBA-CLE offices (1900 Grant Street, Third Floor), from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Register for the live program here or register for the webcast here. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here: CD • MP3Video OnDemand.

Colorado Supreme Court: Insurer Failed to Show Documents in Question Contained Trade Secrets

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in In re Rumnock v. Anschutz on Monday, December 5, 2016.

Pretrial Procedure—Protective Orders—Trade Secrets—Commercial Information.

The Colorado Supreme Court discharged its rule to show cause and affirmed the trial court’s partial denial of defendant American Family Mutual Insurance Company’s request for a protective order to restrict plaintiff’s use of alleged trade secrets. The court held that American Family failed to meet its burden to show that the documents were in fact trade secrets or other confidential commercial information.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.