June 23, 2018

Bills Signed Requiring Commercial Drivers to Receive Training in Human Trafficking Prevention, Modifying Water Court Process for Substitute Water Rights, and More

On Thursday, April 12, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 23 bills into law. To date, he has signed 149 bills and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. Some of the bills signed Thursday include a bill allowing a water court process for mitigation measures, a bill requiring commercial drivers to receive training on prevention of human trafficking, a bill authorizing insurers’ agents to access the electronic motor vehicle title database, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-011 – “Concerning Treatment of Students who are Excused by their Parents from Participating in State Assessments,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Andy Kerr and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Paul Lundeen. The bill clarifies procedures for parents who excuse their children from taking state assessments and students whose parents excuse them from testing shall still be allowed to receive rewards designed for students who complete the assessments.
  • SB 18-079 – “Concerning Classifying Sake as a Vinous Liquor for the Purposes of the ‘Colorado Liquor Code,'” by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill classifies sake as a vinous liquor (wine) for the purposes of the “Colorado Liquor Code.”
  • SB 18-087 – “Concerning In-state Tuition at Institutions of Higher Education for Certain Foreign Nationals Legally Settled in Colorado,” by Sen. Stephen Fenberg and Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Faith Winter. The bill contains a legislative declaration about the circumstances facing special immigrants and refugees and the benefit of access to education.
  • SB 18-106 – “Concerning Obsolete Statutory Provisions Related to a Local Government’s Pledging of Sales or Use Tax Revenues to Pay for Revenue Bonds Issued for the Purpose of Financing Capital Improvements,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Don Thurlow. Current law specifies that a county, city, or incorporated town may include the creation of a sales and use tax capital improvement fund (special fund) when the county, city, or incorporated town seeks voter approval to levy a sales or use tax. The creation of the special fund does not have a purpose for a county, city, or incorporated town post-TABOR because the question of using sales or use tax revenues for financing capital improvements is asked when the county, city, or incorporated town seeks voter approval for the bond issuance. Thus, the language regarding the creation of the fund is unnecessary.
  • SB 18-110 – “Concerning the Repeal of the Requirement that Each State Agency Annually Report the Amount of Federal Money it Received in the Prior Fiscal Year,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. During the 2017 legislative session, the statutory revision committee put forth House Bill 17-1058, which, in part, repealed a requirement that the state controller submit to the general assembly a report of all federal money received by state agencies during the prior fiscal year. State agencies are still required to submit an annual report to the state controller of all federal moneys received by the state agency in the prior fiscal year for the state controller’s use in preparing the report for the general assembly.The bill repeals the state agency reporting requirement as the state controller is no longer required to prepare a report for the general assembly.
  • SB 18-127 – “Concerning the Repeal of the Department of Revenue’s Requirement to Publish an Historical Explanation of Income Tax Rate Modifications Enacted in the State on Every Income Tax Return Form,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the requirement that the Executive Director of the Department of Revenue publish an historical explanation of income tax rate modifications enacted in the state on every income tax return form.
  • SB 18-129 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Reorganization of the Law Exempting from State Sales Tax Certain Drugs and Medical and Therapeutic Devices,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill makes several modifications to the laws exempting certain drugs and medical devices from sales tax.
  • SB 18-136 – “Concerning Fees for Advising Clients About the Selection of an Individual Health Benefit Plan,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lang Sias. The bill allows an insurance producer or broker advising a client on individual health benefit plans to charge the client a fee if the producer or broker does not receive a commission related to the individual health benefit plan selected by the client and if the producer or broker discloses in writing the fee to the client.
  • SB 18-161 – “Concerning Repeal of the Behavioral Health Transformation Council,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lois Landgraf. The bill repeals the behavioral health transformation council.
  • SB 18-162 – “Concerning Substitute Child Care Providers,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Janet Buckner & James Wilson. The bill creates a license within the Department of Human Services for a substitute placement agency that places or that facilitates or arranges placement of substitute child care providers in licensed child care facilities providing less than 24-hour care.
  • SB 18-170 – “Concerning a Water Court Process by Which an Owner of a Storage Water Right Allowing Water to be Stored in New Reservoir Capacity may Release Water into an Identified Stream Reach in a Manner that Protects the Water Releases while Complying with Mitigation Measures Identified in a Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Plan Approved by the Colorado Water Conservation Board,” by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. Chris Hansen & Hugh McKean. The bill establishes a water court process by which an owner of a water storage right allowing water to be stored in a newly constructed reservoir or an enlarged existing reservoir may comply with the mitigation measures identified in a mitigation plan by contracting with the board.
  • SB 18-172 – “Concerning Testing of Horse Racing Licensees for the Presence of Prohibited Substances,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill adds to the responsibilities of the Colorado racing commission the protection of all participants, human and animal, involved in horse racing.
  • SB 18-176 – “Concerning Changes to the Requirements for Meeting Dates for the Board of the Southwestern Water Conservation District,” by Sen. Don Coram and Reps. Barbara McLachlin & Marc Catlin. The bill requires the Board of the Southwestern Water Conservation District to meet once every three months and makes amendments to the terms of the board members and board president.
  • SB 18-182 – “Concerning the Authority to Allocate a Portion of the Source Market Fee to Statutorily Authorized Purse Funds,” by Sens. Don Coram & Lucia Guzman and Reps. Marc Catlin & Jeni James Arndt. Current law requires persons outside of Colorado who accept wagers from residents of Colorado on simulcast horse racing events to be licensed in Colorado and to pay a source market fee into the racing cash fund. The bill authorizes the Director of the Division of Racing Events to allocate a portion of the source market fee to be paid to any horse purse trust fund established pursuant to existing law, if necessary, to maintain a sustainable and competitive purse structure in Colorado.
  • SB 18-183 – “Concerning Authorizing Agents of Insurers to Access the Electronic System that Insurers Access for Owner and Lienholder Information of a Motor Vehicle,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Reps. Jeni James Arndt & Larry Liston. Current law authorizes the creation and maintenance of an electronic system that vehicle towers, insurers, and salvage pools may use to access motor vehicle title records if the vehicle is insured or possessed by those entities. The bill allows an agent of an insurer to use the system in the same circumstances.
  • SB 18-184 – “Concerning a New Permit for the Short-term Extraction of Construction Materials,” by Sen. Don Coram and Reps. Hugh McKean & Daneya Esgar. The bill creates a new class of limited impact construction materials permits for one-time activities that produce construction materials as a by-product and are not intended to be ongoing mining operations and authorizes an application fee of $400 for the permit and an annual fee of $200.
  • HB 18-1017 – “Concerning the Adoption of an Interstate Compact to Allow a Person Authorized to Practice Psychology in a Compact State in Which the Person is not Licensed, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Dafna Michelson Jenet and Sens. Bon Gardner & Stephen Fenberg. The bill enacts the ‘Psychology Interjurisdictional Compact Act’ allowing psychologists licensed in any compact state to provide telepsychology services to clients in any other compact state, or temporary in-person client services in any compact state not exceeding 30 days in a calendar year.
  • HB 18-1018 – “Concerning a Requirement that Education to Prevent Human Trafficking be Included in the Training to Obtain a Commercial Driver’s License,” by Reps. Terri Carver & Dominique Jackson and Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & John Cooke. The bill requires that the training to obtain a commercial driver’s license to drive a combination vehicle contain education to prevent human trafficking if the training is conducted in a driving school. The department must also publish information about human trafficking for commercial driver’s license holders and trainees.
  • HB 18-1049 – “Concerning the Department of Human Services’ Authority to Continue to Lease Portions of the Grand Junction Regional Center Campus to Third-party Behavioral Health Providers,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sen. Ray Scott. The Department of Human Services currently leases portions of the Grand Junction regional center campus to third-party behavioral health providers. The bill authorizes the Department to continue such leases until June 30, 2020, and each party to such lease may terminate the lease early provided that the terminating party provide the other party with 90 days notice before vacating the property or requiring the property to be vacated.
  • HB 18-1056 – “Concerning the Statewide Standard Health History Form that Members of the Fire and Police Pension Association Complete when Commencing Employment,” by Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & Dave Williams and Sen. John Cooke. Every member of the fire and police pension association (FPPA), at the commencement of employment, is required to complete a health history on a statewide standard health history form. The bill clarifies several aspects of the form.
  • HB 18-1078 – “Concerning Court Programs for Defendants who have Served in the Armed Forces,” by Reps. Lois Landgraf & Tony Exum and Sen. Bob Gardner. Under current law, the chief judge of a judicial district may establish an appropriate program for the treatment of veterans and members of the military. The bill states that, in establishing any such program, the chief judge, in collaboration with the probation department, the district attorney, and the state public defender, shall establish program guidelines and eligibility criteria. The bill requires a court, in determining whether to issue an order to seal criminal records of a petitioner who has successfully completed a veterans treatment program, to consider such factor favorably in making the determination.
  • HB 18-1154 – “Concerning Consumer Protections Relating to a Solicitation to Provide a Copy of a Public Record for a Fee,” by Reps. Edie Hooten & Kevin Van Winkle and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill requires a person who solicits a fee for providing a copy of a deed or deed of trust to give a copy of the document that will be used for the solicitation to each county clerk and recorder where the solicitation is to be distributed; not charge a fee of more than 4 times the amount charged by the county clerk and recorder; and include specified disclosures.
  • HB 18-1239 – “Concerning Continuation under the Sunset Law of the Environmental Management System Permit Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies by Allowing the Program to Repeal,” by Rep. Lois Landgraf and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill implements the recommendations of the sunset review and report on the environmental management system permit program by allowing the program to repeal.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

The Fatal Flaw

Several years ago I wrote a screenplay that did okay in a contest. I made a couple trips to Burbank to pitch it, got no sustained interest, and gave up on it. Recently, someone who actually knows what he’s doing encouraged me to revise and re-enter it. Among other things, he introduced me to Inside Story: The Power of the Transformational Arc, by Dara Marks (2007). The book describes what the author calls “the essential story element” — which, it turns out, is remarkably apt not just for film but for life in general, and particularly for talking about economics, technology, and the workplace.

No kidding.

What is it?

The Fatal Flaw.

This is from the book:

First, it’s important to recap or highlight the fundamental premise on which the fatal flaw is based:

  • Because change is essential for growth, it is a mandatory requirement for life.
  • If something isn’t growing and developing, it can only be headed toward decay and death.
  • There is no condition of stasis in nature. Nothing reaches a permanent position where neither growth nor diminishment is in play.

As essential as change is, most of us resist it, and cling rigidly to old survival systems because they are familiar and “seem” safer. In reality, if an old, obsolete survival system makes us feel alone, isolated, fearful, uninspired, unappreciated, and unloved, we will reason that it’s easier to cope with what we know that with what we haven’t yet experienced. As a result, most of us will fight to sustain destructive relationships, unchallenging jobs, unproductive work, harmful addictions, unhealthy environments, and immature behavior long after there is any sign of life or value to them.

This unyielding commitment to old, exhausted survival systems that have outlived their usefulness, and resistance to the rejuvenating energy of new, evolving levels of existence and consciousness is what I refer to as the fatal flaw of character:

The Fatal Flaw is a struggle within a character
to maintain a survival system
long after it has outlived its usefulness.

As it is with screenwriting, so it is with us as we’re reckoning with the wreckage of today’s collision among economics, technology, and the workplace. We’re like the character who must change or die to make the story work: our economic survival is at risk, and failure to adapt is fatal. Faced with that prospect, we can change our worldview, or we can wish we had. Trouble is, our struggle to embrace a new paradigm is as perilous as holding to an old one.

What’s more, we will also need to reckon with two peculiar dynamics of our time: “echo chambers” and “epistemic bubbles.” The following is from an Aeon Magazine article published earlier this week entitled “Escape The Echo Chamber”:

Something has gone wrong with the flow of information. It’s not just that different people are drawing subtly different conclusions from the same evidence. It seems like different intellectual communities no longer share basic foundational beliefs. Maybe nobody cares about the truth anymore, as some have started to worry. Maybe political allegiance has replaced basic reasoning skills. Maybe we’ve all become trapped in echo chambers of our own making – wrapping ourselves in an intellectually impenetrable layer of likeminded friends and web pages and social media feeds.

But there are two very different phenomena at play here, each of which subvert the flow of information in very distinct ways. Let’s call them echo chambers and epistemic bubbles. Both are social structures that systematically exclude sources of information. Both exaggerate their members’ confidence in their beliefs. But they work in entirely different ways, and they require very different modes of intervention. An epistemic bubble is when you don’t hear people from the other side. An echo chamber is what happens when you don’t trust people from the other side.

An echo chamber doesn’t destroy their members’ interest in the truth; it merely manipulates whom they trust and changes whom they accept as trustworthy sources and institutions.

Here’s a basic check: does a community’s belief system actively undermine the trustworthiness of any outsiders who don’t subscribe to its central dogmas? Then it’s probably an echo chamber.

That’s what we’re up against. We’ll plow fearlessly ahead next time.

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: When We Move, We Can Achieve the Impossible.”

Colorado Supreme Court: Only Privilege-Holder Can Waive Physician-Patient Privilege, and Only By Injecting Condition Into Case

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in Gadeco, LLC v. Grynberg on Monday, April 9, 2018.

Physician-Patient Privilege—Implied Waiver.

In this original proceeding, the supreme court considered whether the trial court abused its discretion when it found that defendant impliedly waived the physician-patient privilege as to his mental health records by asserting counterclaims for breach of contract, requesting specific performance, and denying the opposing parties’ allegations. The court affirmed its rule that only privilege holders—patients—can impliedly waive the physician-patient privilege, and they do so by injecting their physical or mental condition into the case as the basis of a claim or an affirmative defense. Correspondingly, an adverse party cannot place a patient’s mental condition at issue through its defenses, nor can a privilege holder do so by denying an adverse party’s allegations. Applying those rules, the court held that defendant did not waive the physician-patient privilege through his counterclaims or answer. The court concluded that the trial court abused its discretion by ordering defendant to produce his medical records for in camera review and made the rule to show cause absolute.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

Bus Riding Economists

Lord, I was born a ramblin’ man
Tryin’ to make a livin’ and doin’ the best I can[1]

A couple economists took the same bus I did one day last week. We’ll call them “Home Boy” and “Ramblin’ Man.”. They made acquaintance when Ramblin’ Man put his money in the fare box and didn’t get a transfer coupon. He was from out of town, he said, and didn’t know how to work it. Home Boy explained that you need to wait until the driver gets back from her break. Ramblin’ Man said he guessed the money was just gone, but the driver showed up about then and checked the meter — it showed he’d put the money in, so he got his transfer. Technology’s great, ain’t it?

Ramblin’ Man took the seat in front of me. Home Boy sat across the aisle. When the conversation turned to economics, I eavesdropped[2] shamelessly. Well not exactly — they were talking pretty loud. Ramblin’ Man said he’d been riding the bus for two days to get to the VA. That gave them instant common ground:  they were both Vietnam vets, and agreed they were lucky to get out alive.

Ramblin’ Man said when he got out he went traveling — hitchhike, railroad, bus, you name it. That was back in the 70’s, when a guy could go anywhere and get a job. Not no more. Now he lives in a small town up on northeast Montana. He likes it, but it’s a long way to get to the VA, but he knew if he could get here, there’d be a bus to take him right to it, and sure enough there was. That’s the trouble with those small towns, said Home Boy — nice and quiet, but not enough people to have any services. I’ll bet there’s no bus company up there, he chuckled. Not full of people like Minneapolis.

Minneapolis! Ramblin’ Man lit up at the mention of it. All them people, and no jobs. He was there in 2009, right after the bankers ruined the economy. Yeah, them and the politicians, Home Boy agreed. Shoulda put them all in jail. It’s those one-percenters. They got it fixed now so nobody makes any money but them. It’s like it was back when they were building the railroads and stuff. Now they’re doing it again. Nobody learns from history — they keep doing the same things over and over. They’re stuck in the past.

Except this time, it’s different, said Ramblin’ Man. It’s all that technology — takes away all the jobs. Back in 09, he’d been in Minneapolis for three months, and his phone never rang once for a job offer. Not once. Never used to happen in the 70’s.

And then my stop came up, and my economic history lesson was over. My two bus riding economists had covered the same developments I’ve been studying for the past 15 months. My key takeaway? That “The Economy” is a lazy fiction — none of us really lives there. Instead, we live in the daily challenges of figuring out how to get the goods and services we need — maybe to thrive (if you’re one of them “one-percenters”), or maybe just to get by. The Economy isn’t some transcendent structure, it’s created one human transaction at a time — like when a guy hits the road to make sense of life after a war, picking up odd jobs along the way until eventually he settles in a peaceful little town in the American Outback. When we look at The Economy that way, we get a whole new take on it. That’s precisely what a new breed of cross-disciplinary economists are doing, and we’ll examine their outlook in the coming weeks.

In the meantime, I suspect that one of the reasons we don’t learn from history is that we don’t know it. In that regard, I recently read a marvelous economic history book that taught me a whole lot I never knew:  Americana: A 400-Year History of American Capitalism (2017)  by tech entrepreneur Bhu Srinivasan. Here’s the promo blurb:

“From the days of the Mayflower and the Virginia Company, America has been a place for people to dream, invent, build, tinker, and bet the farm in pursuit of a better life. Americana takes us on a four-hundred-year journey of this spirit of innovation and ambition through a series of Next Big Things — the inventions, techniques, and industries that drove American history forward: from the telegraph, the railroad, guns, radio, and banking to flight, suburbia, and sneakers, culminating with the Internet and mobile technology at the turn of the twenty-first century. The result is a thrilling alternative history of modern America that reframes events, trends, and people we thought we knew through the prism of the value that, for better or for worse, this nation holds dearest: capitalism. In a winning, accessible style, Bhu Srinivasan boldly takes on four centuries of American enterprise, revealing the unexpected connections that link them.”

This is American history as we never learned it, and the book is well worth every surprising page.


[1] From “Ramblin’ Man,” by the Allman Brothers. Here’s a 1970 live version. And here’s the studio version.

[2] If you wonder, as I did, where “eavesdrop” came from, here’s the Word Detective’s explanation.

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: When We Move, We Can Achieve the Impossible.”

Bills Signed Regarding Fiduciary Duties of Title Insurance Entities, Public Official Oaths and Affirmations, and More

On Thursday, March 29, 2018, the governor signed 17 bills into law. He also signed 16 bills into law on Monday, April 2, 2018. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 114 bills this legislative session and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday and Monday include a bill concerning the fiduciary duties of title insurance entities with regard to funds held for closing, a bill exempting physicians who treat patients with rare disorders from non-compete agreements, several bills updating outdated statutory language, bills regarding financing broadband for rural areas, a bill requiring reporting when title to a motor vehicle has been transferred, and more. The bills signed Thursday and Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1012 – “Concerning Vision Care Plans for Eye Care Services,” by Reps. Jon Becker & Susan Lontine and Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Irene Aguilar. The bill prohibits a carrier or entity that offers a vision care plan from requiring an eye care provider with whom the carrier or entity contracts to provide services at a set fee, charge a person for noncovered services, or participate in a carrier’s other vision plan networks.
  • HB 18-1091 – “Concerning Dementia Diseases, and, in Connection Therewith, Updating Statutory References to Dementia Diseases and Related Disabilities,” by Reps. Susan Beckman & Joann Ginal and Sens. Jim Smallwood & Nancy Todd. The bill updates statutory references to Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases and reflects that dementia diseases have related disabilities impacting memory and other cognitive abilities.
  • HB 18-1099 – “Concerning Criteria that the Broadband Deployment Board is Required to Develop with Regard to an Incumbent Telecommunications Provider’s Exercise of a Right to Implement a Broadband Deployment Project in an Unserved Area of the State Upon a Nonincumbent Provider’s Application to the Broadband Deployment Board to Implement a Proposed Broadband Deployment Project in the Unserved Area,” by Reps. Marc Catlin & Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill requires that the Broadband Deployment Board’s criteria include requirements that an incumbent telecommunications provider exercising its right to implement a broadband deployment project for the unserved area agree to provide demonstrated downstream and upstream speeds equal to or faster than the speeds indicated in the applicant’s proposed project and at a cost per household that is equal to or less than the cost per household indicated in the applicant’s proposed project.
  • HB 18-1103 – “Concerning the Ability of a Local Government to Require a Driver to Meet Safety Standards for the Use of an Off-highway Vehicle,” by Rep. Barbara McLaughlin and Sen. Don Coram. The bill clarifies that a local government does not violate state rules if it imposes certain requirements on a driver of an off-highway vehicle.
  • HB 18-1130 – “Concerning Increasing the Availability of Qualified Personnel who are Licensed in Another State to Teach in Public Schools,” by Reps. Dave Williams & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill changes requirements for special education teacher requirements from 3 years of continuous experience to 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1137 – “Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports to the General Assembly, and, in Connection Therewith, Continuing the Requirements for Reports by the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill continues reporting requirements of the Departments of Transportation and Public Safety.
  • HB 18-1138 – “Concerning Standardizing Public Official Oaths of Office, and, in Connection Therewith, Providing a Uniform Oath Text and Establishing Requirements for Taking, Subscribing, Administering, and Filing Public Oaths of Office,” by Rep. Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill establishes a single uniform text for swearing or affirming an oath of office and the requirements regarding how and when an oath or affirmation of office must be taken, subscribed, administered, and filed.
  • HB 18-1139 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated Statutory References to Repealed Reporting Requirements that were Previously Imposed on the Parks and Wildlife Commission with Regard to its Rule-making Authority to Set Fees,” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes obsolete references to a statutory subsection that was repealed on September 1, 2017.
  • HB 18-1158 – “Concerning a Supplemental Appropriation to the Department of Corrections,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes a supplemental appropriation to the Department of Corrections.
  • HB 18-1171 – “Concerning Adjustments in the Amount of Total Program Funding for Public Cchools for the 2017-18 Budget Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill adjusts the minimum amount of total program funding specified in statute to reflect this intent for the actual funded pupil count and the actual at-risk pupil count.
  • HB 18-1196 – “Concerning Authorization to Verify the Disability of an Applicant to the Aid to the Needy Disabled Program,” by Rep. Tony Exum and Sens. Nancy Todd & Beth Martinez Humenik. Under current law, in order to receive assistance under the aid to the needy disabled program, an applicant must be examined by a physician, physician assistant, advanced practice nurse, or registered nurse. The bill adds to the list of persons authorized to perform an examination a licensed psychologist, or any other licensed or certified health care personnel the department of human services deems appropriate.
  • HB 18-1233 – “Concerning a Consumer Reporting Agency’s Placement of a Security Freeze on the Consumer Report of a Consumer who is Under the Charge of a Representative at the Request of the Consumer’s Representative,” by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Polly Lawrence and Sens. Stephen Fenberg & Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes a parent or legal guardian (representative) to request that a consumer reporting agency place a security freeze on the consumer report of either a minor less than 16 years of age or another individual who is a ward of the representative (protected consumer).
  • SB 18-002 – “Concerning the Financing of Broadband Deployment,” by Sens. Don Coram & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. KC Becker & Crisanta Duran. The bill amends the definition of ‘broadband network’ to increase the speed of downstream broadband internet service from at least 4 megabits per second to at least 10 megabits per second and the definition of ‘unserved area’ to refer to an area that is unincorporated, or within a city with a population of fewer than 7,500 inhabitants, and that is not receiving federal support to construct a broadband network to serve a majority of the households in each census block in the area, and requires the PUC to allocate money.
  • SB 18-028 – “Concerning the Repeal of Certain Requirements for Where a License Plate is Mounted on a Motor Vehicle,” by Sen. Ray Scott and Rep. Jeff Bridges. Current law requires each license plate to be at the approximate center of a motor vehicle and at least 12 inches from the ground. The bill repeals this requirement for the front license plate and replaces it with a requirement that the front license plate be mounted horizontally on the front in the location designated by the manufacturer.
  • SB 18-073 – “Concerning Reporting to the Department of Revenue when Ownership of a Motor Vehicle has been Transferred,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Reps. Kim Ransom & Leslie Herod. The bill creates a voluntary program administered by the Department of Revenue that authorizes the owner of a motor vehicle to report a transfer of ownership of the motor vehicle. If the previous owner reports the transfer to the Department, the previous owner is not subject to liability for the misuse of the vehicle.
  • SB 18-074 – “Concerning Adding Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome to the List of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities,” by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Chris Hansen. The bill adds Prader-Willi syndrome to the list of persons who have mandatory eligibility for services and supports and also to the definition of an ‘intellectual and developmental disability’ for the purpose of receiving services and supports.
  • SB 18-082 – “Concerning a Physician’s Right to Provide Continuing Care to Patients with Rare Disorders Despite a Covenant Not to Compete,” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Sen. Chris Kennedy. The bill exempts physicians who provide care to patients with rare diseases from non-compete agreements.
  • SB 18-090 – “Concerning ‘Rights of Married Women,'” by Sen. Rachel Zenzinger and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections concerning the “rights of married women” to be inclusive of married men and women.
  • SB 18-095 – “Concerning the Removal of Statutory References to the Marital Status of Parents of a Child,” by Sens. Rachel Zenzinger & Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Edie Hooten & Hugh McKean. The bill removes or modernizes outdated statutory references to a ‘legitimate’ or ‘illegitimate’ child and a ‘child born out of wedlock’. Colorado only recognizes parentage of a child and acknowledges that the parent and child relationship extends equally to every child and every parent, regardless of the marital status of the parents.
  • SB 18-098 – “Concerning Amending a Statutory Provision Relating to Interest on Damages that was Ruled Unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill amends C.R.S. § 13-21-101 (1), concerning interest on damages, to reflect a 1996 decision made by the Colorado Supreme Court that ruled certain language in that subsection violated the equal protection clause of the constitution.
  • SB 18-099 – “Concerning the Alignment of Early Childhood Quality Improvement Programs with the Colorado Shines Quality Rating and Improvement System,” by Sens. Michael Merrifield & Kevin Priola and Reps. Brittany Pettersen & James Wilson. The bill amends the application and eligibility requirements for the school-readiness quality improvement program and the infant and toddler quality and availability grant program to align with the Colorado shines quality rating and improvement system to streamline the administration of the programs.
  • SB 18-102 – “Concerning the Requirement for an Odometer Reading when a Motor Vehicle’s Identification Number is Physically Verified,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow. The bill repeals the requirement that the odometer be read when a motor vehicle’s identification number is physically verified.
  • SB 18-104 – “Concerning a Requirement that the Broadband Deployment Board File a Petition with the Federal Communications Commission to Seek a Waiver from the Commission’s Rules Prohibiting a State Entity from Applying for Certain Federal Money Earmarked for Financing Broadband Deployment in Remote Areas of the Nation,” by Sen. Kerry Donovan and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Barbara McLaughlin. The bill requires the broadband deployment board, on or before January 1, 2019, to petition the federal communications commission (FCC) for a waiver from the FCC’s rules prohibiting a state entity from applying for federal money earmarked for broadband deployment in remote areas of the nation through the remote areas fund created as part of the connect America fund established by the FCC.
  • SB 18-111 – “Concerning the Removal of an Obsolete Date in the Law that Designates State Legal Holidays,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law specifies that if executive branch employees who are in the state personnel system are required to work on a state legal holiday, the employees shall receive an alternate day off or be paid in accordance with the state personnel system or state fiscal rules in effect on April 30, 1979. The state fiscal rules in effect in 1979 have been amended numerous times since that time and are no longer applicable or relevant. The bill removes the reference to April 30, 1979.
  • SB 18-121 – “Concerning Certain Expenses Allowed to a State Employee when the Employee is Required to Change his or her Place of Residence in Connection with a Change in Job Duties,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Current law allows an employee in the state personnel system his or her moving and relocation expenses if an appointing authority requires the employee to change his or her place of residence due to a change in job duties. The bill specifies that moving expenses, including the reasonable expenses of moving household goods and personal effects and the reasonable costs of traveling to a new residence, are reimbursable in accordance with rules promulgated by the state controller and in compliance with the regulations of the federal internal revenue service.
  • SB 18-125 – “Concerning Fiduciary Responsibilities of Title Insurance Entities to Protect Funds held in Conjunction with Real Estate Closing Settlement Services,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Daniel Kagan and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill requires title insurance entities and affiliates or subsidiaries to hold funds belonging to others in a fiduciary capacity. ‘Fiduciary funds’ means all funds received in conjunction with real estate closing and settlement services.
  • SB 18-131 – “Concerning Modifications to the “State Employees Group Benefits Act,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modifies several provisions of the State Employees Group Benefits Act to bring it into compliance with current state and federal law and to eliminate obsolete provisions.
  • SB 18-134 – “Concerning the Exemption of Nonprofit Water Companies from Regulation by the Public Utilities Commission,” by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. Under current law, the public utilities commission is directed to grant simplified regulatory treatment to water companies that serve fewer than 1,500 customers. The bill expands on this concept by deregulating water companies that are registered as nonprofits, so long as their rates, charges, and terms and conditions of service are just and reasonable.
  • SB 18-135 – “Concerning Updates to the Colorado Code of Military Justice,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Terri Carver & Pete Lee. The bill updates several parts of the Colorado Code of Military Justice.
  • SB 18-138 – “Concerning Authorization for Retail Sellers of Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption to Sell Remaining Inventory to Another On-premises Retail Seller of Alcohol Beverages with whom there is Common Ownership when No Longer Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Andy Kerr and Reps. Matt Gray & Larry Liston. The bill allows persons with certain retail licenses to purchase alcohol beverages from another retail licensee when there is common ownership between the licensees and the seller has surrendered its license within the last 60 days.
  • SB 18-160 – “Concerning the Authority to Operate Certain Teacher Development Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing Alternative Licensure Programs and Induction Programs,” by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. Under existing law, school districts are permitted to operate induction programs for teachers, special services providers, principals, and administrators, and alternative licensure programs for teachers and principals, who do not hold professional licenses. The bill clarifies that charter schools and the state charter school institute may operate such programs.
  • SB 18-165 – “Concerning Requirements for Public Administrators,” by Sens. Tim Neville & Nancy Todd and Reps. Faith Winter & Lori Saine. The bill The bill increases the amount of bond public administrators are required to maintain to $100,000 and clarifies additional requirements.
  • SB 18-173 – “Concerning the Ability of Certain Establishments Licensed to Sell Alcohol Beverages for On-premises Consumption that Serve Food to Allow a Customer to Remove One Opened Container of Partially Consumed Vinous Liquor from the Licensed Premises,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Rep. Leslie Herod. Currently, certain liquor licensees may sell one opened container of partially consumed vinous liquor to a customer if the licensee has meals available for consumption on the licensed premises. The bill expands the requirement to include licensees that makes sandwiches and light snacks available for consumption on the premises.

For a list of all of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

On the Third Hand, Continued

Will the machines take over the jobs?

In a recent TED talk, scholar, economist, author, and general wunderkind Daniel Susskindl[1] says the question is distracting us from a much bigger and more important issue: how will we feed, clothe, and shelter ourselves if we no longer work for a living?:

If we think of the economy as a pie, technological progress makes the pie bigger. Technological unemployment, if it does happen, in a strange way will be a symptom of that success — we will have solved one problem — how to make the pie bigger — but replaced it with another — how to make sure that everyone gets a slice. As other economists have noted, solving this problem won’t be easy.

Today, for most people, their job is their seat at the economic dinner table, and in a world with less work or even without work, it won’t be clear how they get their slice. This is the collective challenge that’s right in front of us — to figure out how this material prosperity generated by our economic system can be enjoyed by everyone in a world in which our traditional mechanism for slicing up the pie, the work that people do, withers away and perhaps disappears.

Guy Standing, another British economist, agrees with Susskind about this larger issue. The following excerpts are from his book The Corruption of Capitalism. He begins by quoting Nobel prizewinning economist Herbert Simon’s 1960 prediction:

Within the very near future — much less than twenty-five years — we shall have the technical capacity of substituting machines for any and all human functions in organisations.

And then he makes these comments:

You do not receive a Nobel Prize for Economics for being right all the time! Simon received his in 1978, when the number of people in jobs was at record levels. It is higher still today. Yet the internet-based technological revolution has reopened age-old visions of machine domination. Some are utopian, such as the post-capitalism of Paul Mason, imagining an era of free information and information sharing. Some are decidedly dystopian, where the robots — or rather their owners — are in control and mass joblessness is coupled with a “panopticon” state[2] subjecting the proles to intrusive surveillance, medicalized therapy and brain control. The pessimists paint a “world without work.” With every technological revolution there is a scare that machines will cause “technological unemployment”. This time the Jeremiahs seem a majority.

Whether or not they will do so in the future, the technologies have not yet produced mass unemployment . . . [but they] are contributing to inequality.

While technology is not necessarily destroyed jobs, it is helping to destroy the old income distribution system.

The threat is technology-induced inequality, not technological unemployment.”

Economic inequality and income distribution (sharing national wealth on a basis other than individual earned income) are two sides of the issue of economic fairness — always an inflammatory topic.

When I began my study of economics 15 months ago, I had never heard of economic inequality, and income distribution was something socialist countries did. Now I find both topics all over worldwide economic news and commentary and still mostly absent in U.S. public discourse (such as it is) outside of academic circles. On the whole, most policy-makers on both the left and right maintain their allegiance to the post-WWII Mont Pelerin neoliberal economic model, supported by a cultural and moral bias in favor of working for a living, and if the plutocrats take a bigger slice of pie while the welfare rug gets pulled on the working poor, well then so be it. If the new robotic and super-intelligent digital workers do in fact cause massive technological unemployment among the humans, we’ll all be reexamining these beliefs, big time.

I began this series months ago by asking whether money can buy happiness, citing the U.N.’s World Happiness Report. The 2018 Report was issued this week, and who should be on top but… Finland! And guess what — among other things, factors cited include low economic inequality and strong social support systems (i.e., a cultural value for non-job-based income distribution). National wealth was also a key factor, but it alone didn’t buy happiness: the USA, with far and away the strongest per capita GDP, had an overall ranking of 18th. For more, see this World Economic Forum article or this one from the South China Morning Post.

We’ll be looking further into all of this (and much more) in the weeks to come.


[1] If you’ve been following this column for awhile and the name “Susskind” sounds familiar, a couple years ago, I blogged about the future and culture of the law, often citing the work of Richard Susskind, whose opus is pretty much the mother lode of crisp thinking about the law and technology. His equally brilliant son Daniel joined him in a book that also addressed other professions, which that series also considered. (Those blogs were collected in Cyborg Lawyers.) Daniel received a doctorate in economics from Oxford University, was a Kennedy Scholar at Harvard, and is now a Fellow in Economics at Balliol College, Oxford. Previously, he worked as a policy adviser in the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit and as a senior policy adviser in the Cabinet Office.

[2] The panopticon architectural structure was the brainchild of legal philosopher Jeremy Bentham. For an introduction to the origins of his idea and its application to the digital age, see this article in The Guardian.

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: When We Move, We Can Achieve the Impossible.”

Bills Modernizing Statutory Language, Requiring Rent Receipts from Landlords, and More Signed

On Thursday, March 22, 2018, the governor signed 25 bills into law. He also sent one  bill to the Secretary of State without a signature on Friday. To date, he has signed 81 bills and sent one to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday include several bills modernizing and clarifying statutory language, as well as a bill requiring residential landlords to issue rent receipts, a bill adding two types of protection orders, and more. The bills signed Thursday and passed on Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-005 – “Concerning Economic Assistance for Rural Communities Experiencing Certain Significant Economic Events that Lead to Substantial Job Loss in those Communities, and, in Connection Therewith, Authorizing the Department of Local Affairs to Coordinate Nonmonetary Assistance to Assist Rural Communities with Job Creation or Retention,” by Sens. Kerry Donovan & Ray Scott and Rep. Dylan Roberts. The bill authorizes the Executive Director of the Department of Local Affairs (Executive Director) or the Executive Director’s designee to coordinate the provision of nonmonetary resources to assist with job retention or creation in a rural community experiencing a significant economic event, such as a plant closure or layoffs, including industry-wide layoffs, that has a significant, quantifiable impact on jobs within that community.
  • SB 18-009 – “Concerning the Right of Consumers of Electricity to Interconnect Energy Storage Systems for Use on their Property,” by Sens. Kevin Priola & Stephen Fenberg and Reps. Faith Winter & Polly Lawrence. The bill declares that consumers of electricity have a right to install, interconnect, and use energy storage systems on their property, and that this will enhance the reliability and efficiency of the electric grid, save money, and reduce the need for additional electric generation facilities.
  • SB 18-010 – “Concerning the Requirement that a Residential Landlord Provide a Tenant with Specified Documents Relevant to the Landlord-Tenant Relationship, and, in Connection Therewith, Specifying Rent Receipts and Copies of any Written Lease Agreement as Documents that Must be Provided,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Angela Williams and Rep. Tony Exum. The bill requires a residential landlord to provide each tenant with a copy of a written rental agreement signed by the parties and to give a tenant a contemporaneous receipt for any payment made in person with cash or a money order. For payments not made in person with cash or a money order, the landlord must provide a receipt if the tenant requests it.
  • SB 18-020 – “Concerning Mental Health Care Professionals who are Permitted to Perform Auricular Acudetox,” by Sen. Leroy Garcia and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill allows registered psychotherapists who have documented that they have undergone auricular acudetox training to perform auricular acudetox.
  • SB 18-046 – “Concerning Authorization to Increase the Minimum Donation Required to be Issued a Certificate that Qualifies a Person to be Issued a Group Special License Plate,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Faith Winter. The bill authorizes nonprofit organizations to increase by $10 the minimum donation for the issuance of special license plates.
  • SB 18-060 – “Concerning Protective Orders in Criminal Cases,” by Sen. Don Coram and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill adds 2 new potential protection orders to the list of options available to the court. They are an order prohibiting the taking, transferring, concealing, harming, disposing of, or threatening to harm an animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by the alleged victim or witness; and an order directing a wireless telephone service provider to transfer the financial responsibility for and rights to a wireless telephone number or numbers to the alleged victim or witness if the alleged victim or witness satisfies certain criteria.
  • SB 18-069 – “Concerning Enforcement of Statewide Degree Transfer Agreements,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Rachel Zenzinger and Reps. Alec Garnett & Jon Becker. If an institution of higher education admits as a junior a transfer student who holds an associate of arts degree, associate of applied science degree, or an associate of science degree that is the subject of a statewide degree transfer agreement, the institution shall not require the student to complete any additional courses to fulfill general education requirements.
  • SB 18-093 – “Concerning the Repeal of Obsolete Provisions in the Colorado Medical Assistance Program Relating to the Inactive Home- and Community-Based Services Waiver for Persons Living with AIDS,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill repeals the inactive home- and community-based services waiver under the Colorado medical assistance program for persons with health complexes related to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (persons living with AIDS waiver).
  • SB 18-101 – “Concerning Student Admission to Colorado State University – Global Campus,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Nancy Todd and Reps. Millie Hamner & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill removes a prohibition on admitting first-time freshman baccalaureate students who reside in Colorado and who are under 23 years of age.
  • HB 18-1005 – “Concerning Notice of Postsecondary Course Enrollment Options Available to High School Students,” by Reps. Brittany Petterson & Jon Becker and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill requires a notice to students and parents of postsecondary course opportunities to include information regarding the local education provider’s timelines that affect student eligibility to take these courses and a statement informing students that they may significantly reduce college expenses, increase the likelihood of completing college, and earn marketable workforce skills by taking concurrent enrollment courses.
  • HB 18-1023 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to Legalized Marijuana from Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the statutes related to legalized marijuana from Title 12 to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1032 – “Concerning Access to Medical Records from the Department of Public Health and Environment’s EMS Agency Patient Care Database by Health Information Organization Networks,” by Reps. Chris Kennedy & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Rhonda Fields & Jack Tate. The bill requires the Department of Public Health and Environment to provide individualized patient information from the department’s EMS agency patient care database to health information organization networks for any use allowed under the federal “Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.”
  • HB 18-1045 – “Concerning the Application of Silver Diamine Fluoride to Dental Patients,” by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill allows a dental hygienist to apply silver diamine fluoride under the direct or indirect supervision of a dentist.
  • HB 18-1050 – “Concerning Competency to Proceed for Juveniles Involved in the Juvenile Justice System,” by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Rhonda Fields. The bill establishes a juvenile-specific definition of ‘competent to proceed’ and ‘incompetent to proceed’ for juveniles involved in the juvenile justice system, as well as specific definitions for ‘developmental disability’, ‘mental capacity’, and ‘mental disability’ when used in this context. The bill clarifies the procedures for establishing incompetency, as well as for establishing the restoration of competency.
  • HB 18-1051 – “Concerning Statutory Provisions Enacted to Promote the Extinguishment of Unattended Fires,” by Reps. Millie Hamner & Terri Carver and Sens. Don Coram & Michael Merrifield. The bill states that any person who starts or maintains a campfire commits the offense of leaving a campfire unattended if he or she knowingly or recklessly fails to reasonably attend the campfire at all times or fails to thoroughly extinguish the campfire before leaving the site.
  • HB 18-1052 – “Concerning Local Education Providers’ Receipt of Concurrent Enrollment Courses from a Two-year Institution of Higher Education Outside of the Institution’s Approved Service Area when the Institution Approved to Serve the Local Education Provider Declines to Provide Concurrent Enrollment Courses,” by Reps. Paul Lundeen & Jeff Bridges and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill requires the commission to establish a policy that allows a 2-year institution of higher education to provide a concurrent enrollment program or course to a local education provider that is not within its college service area if the designated 2-year institution of higher education chooses not to provide a concurrent enrollment program or course requested by the local education provider.
  • HB 18-1066 – “Concerning Clarifying that the Law Enforcement and Defense Counsel Exemption for Sexual Exploitation of a Child Crime Does Not Change the Discovery Procedures for Sexually Exploitative Material,” by Reps. Yeulin Willett & Mike Foote and Sen. John Cooke. The bill clarifies that the sexual exploitation of a child statute does not change the discovery procedure for sexually exploitative materials and that the defendant and defense counsel personnel are not allowed to receive copies of the materials.
  • HB 18-1073 – “Concerning Water Districts’ Ability to Enter into Contracts Regarding their Water-related Assets,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill authorizes water districts, including water activity enterprises, to enter into contracts for water and the capacity in works and allows the contracts to be based on municipalities’ authority to contract for water and sewer facilities.
  • HB 18-1095 – “Concerning Educator Licenses Issued to Military Spouses,” by Reps. Terri Carver & Jeni James Arndt and Sens. Bob Gardner & Nancy Todd. The bill exempts military spouses from a requirement that teaching or special services experience be continuous, and instead requires 3 years of experience within the previous 7 years.
  • HB 18-1117 – “Concerning Liens that Attach to Personal Property that is Stored at a Self-service Storage Facility,” by Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & James Coleman and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill modifies the law governing the statutory lien that an owner of a self-storage facility has for the occupant’s late payment of rent or other charges.
  • HB 18-1141 – “Concerning the Removal of Outdated References in Statute to ‘Early Childhood Care and Education Councils,'” by Rep. Edie Hooten and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. The bill removes outdated references in statute to “early childhood care and education councils.” The term is no longer used. Instead, these entities are referred to as “early childhood councils.”
  • HB 18-1142 – “Concerning Modernizing Language in Statutory Sections that Refer to Paupers,” by Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Rachel Zenzinger. The bill modernizes the language in statutory sections by replacing the terms ‘pauper’ and ‘paupers’ with ‘indigent’ or ‘indigent persons’.
  • HB 18-1183 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Home Food Service Plans Pursuant to the “Sale of Meat Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Department of Regulatory Agencies’ Sunset Review Recommendation to Repeal the Act,” by Reps. Edie Hooten & Kim Ransom and Sen. Randy Baumgartner. The bill implements the recommendation of the Department of Regulatory Agencies, as contained in the Department’s sunset review of home food service plans, by repealing the ‘Sale of Meat Act’, thereby eliminating the regulation of home food service plans by the department of agriculture.
  • HB 18-1210 – “Concerning Peace Officer Status for the Administrator of Judicial Security in the Colorado Judicial Department,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. John Cooke. The bill designates an administrator of judicial security in the Colorado judicial department as a peace officer who must be certified by the peace officer standards and training board.
  • HB 18-1249 – “Concerning the Requirement that the State Treasurer Distribute any Federal Funds Related to the Naval Oil Shale Reserve Land to Specified Counties or their Federal Mineral Lease Districts,” by Reps. Bob Rankin & Millie Hamner and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. If the state receives any federal mineral lease revenue from oil and gas production on naval oil shale reserve land that was set aside prior to January 1, 2009, and withheld by the federal government, then instead of depositing the money in the mineral leasing fund the state treasurer is required to distribute the money to certain counties or a related federal mineral lease district.

The bill that the governor sent to the Secretary of State without a signature was HB 18-1086, “Concerning Allowing Community Colleges to Offer a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing,” by Reps. Janet Buckner & Paul Lundeen and Sens. Tim Neville & Irene Aguilar.

For a complete list of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

On the Third Hand…

Will the machines take over the jobs? Ask a bunch of economists, and you’ll get opinions organized around competing ideologies, reflecting individual cognitive, emotional, and political biases. That’s been the experience of Martin Fordentrepreneur, TED talker, and New York Times bestselling author of Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future:

In the field of economics the opinions all too often break cleanly along predefined political lines. Knowing the ideological predisposition of a particular economist is often a better predictor of what that individual is likely to say than anything contained in the data under examination. In other words, if you’re waiting for the economists to deliver some sort of definitive verdict on the impact that advancing technology is having on the economy, you may have a very long wait.[1]

In this Psychology Today article, Dr. Karl Albrecht[2] offers a neurological explanation for polarized thinking:

Recent research suggests that our brains may be pre-wired for dichotomized thinking. That’s a fancy name for thinking and perceiving in terms of two — and only two — opposing possibilities.

These research findings might help explain how and why the public discourse of our culture has become so polarized and rancorous, and how we might be able to replace it with a more intelligent conversation.

[O]ur brains can keep tabs on two tasks at a time, by sending each one to a different side of the brain. Apparently, we toggle back and forth, with one task being primary and the other on standby.

Add a third task, however, and one of the others has to drop off the to-do list.

Scans of brain activity during this task switching have led to the hypothesis that the brain actually likes handling things in pairs. Indeed, the brain itself is subdivided into two distinct half-brains, or hemispheres.

Curiously, part of our cranial craving for two-ness might be related to our own physiology: the human body is bilaterally symmetrical. Draw an imaginary center line down through the front of a person and you see a lot of parts (not all, of course), that come in pairs: two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, matching teeth on left and right sides, two shoulders, two arms, two hands, two nipples, two legs, two knees, and two feet. Inside you’ll find two of some things and one of others.

Some researchers are now extending this reasoning to suggest that the brain has a built-in tendency, when confronted by complex propositions, to selfishly reduce the set of choices to just two. Apparently it doesn’t like to work hard.

Considering how quickly we make our choices and set our opinions, it’s unlikely that all of the options will even be identified, never mind carefully considered.

“On the one hand this, on the other hand that,” we like to say. Lawyers perfect the art. Politics and the press also thrive on dichotomy:

Again, our common language encodes the effect of this anatomical self reference. “On the one hand, there is X. But on the other hand, we have Y.” Many people describe political views as being either “left” or “right.”

The popular press routinely constructs “news” stories around conflicts and differences between pairs of opposing people, factions, and ideologies. Bipolar conflict is the very essence of most of the news.

So, are robots and artificially intelligence going to trash the working world, or not?

Hmmm, there might be another option — several, actually. Dr. Albrecht urges us to find them:

Seek the “third hand” — and any other “hands” you can discover. Ask yourself, and others, “Are there other options to be considered?”

We’ll consider some third hand perspectives about the rise of the robots in the coming weeks.


[1] Martin Ford is also the consulting expert for Societe Generale’s new “Rise of the Robots” investment index, which focuses on companies that are “significant participants in the artificial intelligence and robotics revolution.”

[2] According to his website, Karl Albrecht is “is an executive management consultant, futurist, lecturer, and author of more than 20 books on professional achievement, organizational performance, and business strategy. He is also a leading authority on cognitive styles and the development of advanced thinking skills. The Mensa Society honored him with its lifetime achievement award, for significant contributions by a member to the understanding of intelligence. Originally a physicist, and having served as a military intelligence officer and business executive, he now consults, lectures, and writes about whatever he thinks would be fun.”

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: When We Move, We Can Achieve the Impossible.”

Bills Signed Regarding Appropriating Retail Marijuana Sales Tax to Schools, Clarifying Standard for Deceptive Trade Practices, and More

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the governor signed 15 bills into law. To date, he has signed 55 bills this legislative session. Many of Thursday’s bills involved the relocation of statutes from Title 12. Some of the other bills signed include a bill to clarify which entities are eligible to apply for special event beverage licenses, a bill appropriating retail marijuana sales tax to schools, a bill changing the date of special district elections to May every-other year, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1027 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of the Lottery from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12,” by Rep. Cole Wist and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill creates Title 44 and relocates the sections of Title 12 related to the regulation of the lottery to Title 44.
  • HB 18-1028 – “Concerning Clarification of the Standard Required for Applications for a Court Order to Require Compliance with Investigations of Deceptive Trade Practices,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Lois Court & Jack Tate. The bill would allow a judge to issue a court order if compliance with an investigation is necessary to investigate a deceptive trade practice.
  • HB 18-1039 – “Concerning Changing Regular Special District Elections to May of Each Odd-numbered Year, and, in Connection Therewith, Adjusting the Length of Terms Served by Directors Elected in 2020 and 2022 in Order to Implement the New Election Schedule,” by Rep. Kim Ransom and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill moves regular special district elections to the Tuesday following the first Monday of May in odd-numbered years, rather than the Tuesday immediately succeeding the first Monday of May in every even-numbered year, starting in 2023.
  • HB 18-1087 – “Concerning Department of Public Safety Authority to Repeal Rules Relating to Defunct Boards,” by Rep. Dan Thurlow and Sens. Don Coram & Daniel Kagan. The victims compensation and assistance coordinating committee and the victims assistance and law enforcement advisory board in the department of public safety were repealed in 2009. The bill gives the executive director of the department of public safety the authority to repeal rules relating to those repealed boards.
  • HB 18-1096 – “Concerning the Eligibility of Certain Entities to Apply for a Special Event Permit to Sell Alcohol Beverages,” by Rep. Matt Gray and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill adds to the list of organizations authorized to obtain a special event permit to sell alcohol beverages for a limited period an organization that is incorporated under Colorado law for educational purposes.
  • HB 18-1100 – “Concerning the Continuous Appropriation of Money in the Educator Licensure Cash Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill extends the continuous appropriation of money to the State Board of Education and the Department of Education (Department) for its expenses incurred in the administration of the “Colorado Educator Licensing Act of 1991” for three more years.
  • HB 18-1101 – “Concerning Modification of the Manner in which Gross Retail Marijuana Tax Revenue that is Transferred from the General Fund to the State Public School Fund as Required by Current Law is Appropriated from the State Public School Fund,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. Beginning in the 2018-19 fiscal year, the bill requires 12.59% of the gross retail marijuana sales tax revenue remaining in the general fund after a required allocation of 10% of the revenue to local governments to be transferred to the state public school fund, and continuously appropriates that revenue for the same state fiscal year in which it is transferred from the state public school fund to the department of education to help meet the state share of total program funding for school districts and institute charter schools.
  • HB 18-1140 – “Concerning Public Official Personal Surety Bonds, and, in Connection Therewith, Repealing Obsolete Provisions and Authorizing the Purchase of Insurance in Lieu of Public Official Personal Surety Bonds,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Dominick Moreno. The bill repeals obsolete provisions related to personal surety bonds and authorizes a public entity to purchase insurance in lieu of a public official personal surety bond and states the requirements for the insurance.
  • SB 18-036 – “Concerning the Nonsubstantive Relocation of Laws Related to the Regulation of Tobacco Sales to Minors from Title 24, Colorado Revised Statutes, to a New Title 44 as Part of the Organizational Recodification of Title 12, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Daniel Kagan and Rep. Cole Wist. The bill creates Title 44, then relocates the sections of Title 24 regarding the regulation of tobacco sales to minors to Title 44.
  • SB 18-091 – “Concerning Modernizing Terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes Related to Behavioral Health,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill is a follow-up and clean-up to Senate Bill 17-242, which updated and modernized terminology in the Colorado Revised Statutes related to behavioral health, including mental health disorders, alcohol use disorders, and substance use disorders.
  • SB 18-092 – “Concerning Updating Statutory References to ‘County Departments of Social Services,'” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill modernizes outdated references in statute to “County Department(s) of Social Services,” or similar terms, to “County Department(s) of Human or Social Services.” Counties throughout the state have different ways of referring to the department in the county that does human or social services work, so it is necessary for statute to reflect that not all county departments go by one label.
  • SB 18-094 – “Concerning the Repeal of a Duplicate Definitions Section in Article 60 of Title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Edie Hooten. The bill repeals section 27-60-102.5, Colorado Revised Statutes, which is a duplicate definitions section for general provisions related to behavioral health found in article 60 of title 27, Colorado Revised Statutes. The bill leaves in place section 27-60-100.3, Colorado Revised Statutes, enacted by Senate Bill 17-242.
  • SB 18-100 – “Concerning Disclosure of Additional Mandatory Charges by Motor Vehicle Rental Companies,” by Sen. Tim Neville and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Kevin Van Winkle. The bill requires a motor vehicle rental company to disclose to a potential customer, in any vehicle rental cost quote and in the rental agreement, additional mandatory charges applicable to the motor vehicle rental.
  • SB 18-103 – “Concerning the Issuance of Performance-based Incentives for Film Production Activities in the State,” by Sens. Nancy Todd & Jim Smallwood and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Timothy Leonard. The bill strengthens the requirements necessary to earn performance-based incentives for film production activities in the state in various ways.
  • SB 18-164 – “Concerning the Repeal of Reporting Requirements for Certain Unfunded Programs in the Department of Human Services Until Such Time as Funding is Received,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Dan Thurlow. The bill directs that reporting requirements for programs established in the department of human services that have not received funding in several years be placed on hold until such time as the program receives funding.

For all of the governor’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Race Against the Machine, Continued

Rational choice theory is a cornerstone of conventional economic thinking. It states that:

Individuals always make prudent and logical decisions. These decisions provide people with the greatest benefit or satisfaction — given the choices available — and are also in their highest self-interest.

Presumably Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates had something like this in mind when they published an open letter in January 2015 urging that artificial intelligence R&D should focus “not only on making AI more capable, but also on maximizing the societal benefit,” To execute on this imperative, they urged an interdisciplinary collaboration among “economics, law and philosophy. computer security, formal methods and, of course, various branches of AI itself.” (Since its release, the letter has garnered another 8.000 signatures — you can sign it, too, if you like.)

The letter’s steady, rational four paragraphs praise how technology has benefited the human race, and anticipate more of the same in the future, but its reception and the authors’ comments in other contexts are not so measured. As a result, the letter has become a cheering section for those who think humanity is losing its race against the robots.

Consider, for example, the following from an Observer article:

“Success in creating AI would be the biggest event in human history,” wrote Stephen Hawking in an op-ed, which appeared in The Independent in 2014. “Unfortunately, it might also be the last, unless we learn how to avoid the risks.” Professor Hawking added in a 2014 interview with BBC, “humans, limited by slow biological evolution, couldn’t compete and would be superseded by A.I.”

Elon Musk called the prospect of artificial intelligence “our greatest existential threat” in a 2014 interview with MIT students at the AeroAstro Centennial Symposium. “I’m increasingly inclined to think that there should be some regulatory oversight, maybe at the national and international level, just to make sure that we don’t do something very foolish.” Mr. Musk cites his decision to invest in the Artificial Intelligence firm, DeepMind, as a means to “just keep an eye on what’s going on with artificial intelligence. I think there is potentially a dangerous outcome there.”

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has also expressed concerns about Artificial Intelligence. During a Q&A session on Reddit in January 2015, Mr. Gates said, “I am in the camp that is concerned about super intelligence. First the machines will do a lot of jobs for us and not be super intelligent. That should be positive if we manage it well. A few decades after that though the intelligence is strong enough to be a concern. I agree with Elon Musk and some others on this and don’t understand why some people are not concerned.”

Or consider this Elon Musk comment in Vanity Fair:

In a startling public reproach to his friends and fellow techies, Musk warned that they could be creating the means of their own destruction. He told Bloomberg’s Ashlee Vance, the author of the biography Elon Musk, that he was afraid that his friend Larry Page, a co-founder of Google and now the C.E.O. of its parent company, Alphabet, could have perfectly good intentions but still “produce something evil by accident”—including, possibly, “a fleet of artificial intelligence-enhanced robots capable of destroying mankind.”

In other words, Hawking, Gates, and Musk aren’t just worried about machines taking over jobs, they’re worried about the end of the world — or at least the human race. This Washington Post op-ed piece thinks that might not be such a bad thing:

When a technology is so obviously dangerous — like nuclear energy or synthetic biology — humanity has an imperative to consider dystopian predictions of the future. But it also has an imperative to push on, to reach its full potential. While it’s scary, sure, that humans may no longer be the smartest life forms in the room a generation from now, should we really be that concerned? Seems like we’ve already done a pretty good job of finishing off the planet anyway. If anything, we should be welcoming our AI masters to arrive sooner rather than later.

Or consider this open letter written back to Hawking, Gates, and Musk, which basically says forget the fear mongering — it’s going to happen no matter what you think:

Progress is inevitable, even if it is reached by accident and happenstance. Even if we do not intend to, sentient AI is something that will inevitably be created, be it through the evolution of a learning AI, or as a byproduct of some research. No treaty or coalition can stop it, no matter what you think. I just pray you do not go from educated men to fear mongers when it happens.

As usual, we’re at an ideological impasse, with both sides responding not so much according to the pros and cons but according to their predispositions. This article suggests a way through the impasse:

At the beginning of this article, we asked if the pessimists or optimists would be right.

There is a third option, though: one where we move from building jobs around processes and tasks, a solution that is optimal for neither human nor machine, to building jobs around problems.

The article is long, well-researched, and… well, very rational. Too bad — conventional thinking aside — other research shows we rarely act from a rational outlook when it comes to jobs and the economy… or anything else for that matter.

More on that next time.

 

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: When We Move, We Can Achieve the Impossible.”

Race Against the Machine

For the past several years, two MIT big thinkers[1] have been the go-to authorities in the scramble to explain how robotics, artificial intelligence, and big data are revolutionizing the economy and the working world. Their two books were published four and six years ago — so yesterday in the world of technology — but they were remarkably prescient when written, and have not diminished in relevance. They are:

Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy (2012)

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies (2014)

Click here for a chapter-by-chapter digest of The Second Machine Age, written by an all star cast of economic commentators. Among other things, they acknowledge the authors’ view that neoliberal capitalism has not fared well in its dealings with the technological juggernaut, but in the absence of a better alternative, we might as well continue to ride the horse in the direction it’s going.

While admitting that History (not human choice) is “littered with unintended . . . side effects of well-intentioned social and economic policies,” the authors cite Tim O’Reilly[2] in pushing forward with technology’s momentum rather than clinging to the past or present. They suggest that we should let the technologies do their work and just find ways to deal with it. They are “skeptical of efforts to come up with fundamental alternatives to capitalism.”

David Rotman, editor of the MIT Technology Review cites The Second Machine Age extensively in an excellent, longer article, “How Technology is Destroying Jobs.” Although the article is packed with contrary analysis and opinion, the following excepts emphasize what many might consider the shadowy side of the street (compared to the sunny side we looked at in the past couple posts). I added the headings below to emphasize that many of the general economic themes we’ve been talking about also apply to the specific dynamics of the job market.

It used to be that economic growth — including wealth creation — also created more jobs. It doesn’t work that way any more. Perhaps the most damning piece of evidence, according to Brynjolfsson, is a chart that only an economist could love. In economics, productivity—the amount of economic value created for a given unit of input, such as an hour of labor—is a crucial indicator of growth and wealth creation. It is a measure of progress. On the chart Brynjolfsson likes to show, separate lines represent productivity and total employment in the United States.

For years after World War II, the two lines closely tracked each other, with increases in jobs corresponding to increases in productivity. The pattern is clear: as businesses generated more value from their workers, the country as a whole became richer, which fueled more economic activity and created even more jobs. Then, beginning in 2000, the lines diverge; productivity continues to rise robustly, but employment suddenly wilts. By 2011, a significant gap appears between the two lines, showing economic growth with no parallel increase in job creation. Brynjolfsson and McAfee call it the “great decoupling.” And Brynjolfsson says he is confident that technology is behind both the healthy growth in productivity and the weak growth in jobs.

A rising economic tide no longer floats all boats. The result is a skewed allocation of the rewards of growth away from jobs — i.e., economic inequality. The contention that automation and digital technologies are partly responsible for today’s lack of jobs has obviously touched a raw nerve for many worried about their own employment. But this is only one consequence of what ­Brynjolfsson and McAfee see as a broader trend. The rapid acceleration of technological progress, they say, has greatly widened the gap between economic winners and losers—the income inequalities that many economists have worried about for decades..

“[S]teadily rising productivity raised all boats for much of the 20th century,” [Brynjolfsson] says. “Many people, especially economists, jumped to the conclusion that was just the way the world worked. I used to say that if we took care of productivity, everything else would take care of itself; it was the single most important economic statistic. But that’s no longer true.” He adds, “It’s one of the dirty secrets of economics: technology progress does grow the economy and create wealth, but there is no economic law that says everyone will benefit.” In other words, in the race against the machine, some are likely to win while many others lose.

That robots, automation, and software can replace people might seem obvious to anyone who’s worked in automotive manufacturing or as a travel agent. But Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s claim is more troubling and controversial. They believe that rapid technological change has been destroying jobs faster than it is creating them, contributing to the stagnation of median income and the growth of inequality in the United States.

Meanwhile, technology is taking over the jobs that are left— blue collar, white collar, and even the professions. [I]mpressive advances in computer technology—from improved industrial robotics to automated translation services—are largely behind the sluggish employment growth of the last 10 to 15 years. Even more ominous for workers, the MIT academics foresee dismal prospects for many types of jobs as these powerful new technologies are increasingly adopted not only in manufacturing, clerical, and retail work but in professions such as law, financial services, education, and medicine.

Technologies like the Web, artificial intelligence, big data, and improved analytics—all made possible by the ever increasing availability of cheap computing power and storage capacity—are automating many routine tasks. Countless traditional white-collar jobs, such as many in the post office and in customer service, have disappeared.

New technologies are “encroaching into human skills in a way that is completely unprecedented,” McAfee says, and many middle-class jobs are right in the bull’s-eye; even relatively high-skill work in education, medicine, and law is affected.

We’ll spend more time on the shadowy side of the street next time.


[1] Erik Brynjolfsson is director of the MIT Center for Digital Business, and Andrew McAfee is a principal research scientist at MIT who studies how digital technologies are changing business, the economy, and society.

[2] According to his official bio on his website, Tim O’Reilly “is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, Inc. His original business plan was simply ‘interesting work for interesting people,’ and that’s worked out pretty well. O’Reilly Media delivers online learning, publishes books, runs conferences, urges companies to create more value than they capture, and tries to change the world by spreading and amplifying the knowledge of innovators.”

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article:  Meeting Goals the Olympic Way:  Train + Transform.

Bright Sunshiny Day, Continued

Last time, we heard David Lee[1] express his conviction that, far from destroying human jobs, robotic technology will unleash human creativity on a wonderful new world of work. His perspective is so remarkably and refreshingly upbeat that I thought we’d let him continue where he left off last week:

I think it’s important to recognize that we brought this problem on ourselves. And it’s not just because, you know, we are the one building the robots. But even though most jobs left the factory decades ago, we still hold on to this factory mindset of standardization and de-skilling. We still define jobs around procedural tasks and then pay people for the number of hours that they perform these tasks. We’ve created narrow job definitions like cashier, loan processor or taxi driver and then asked people to form entire careers around these singular tasks.

These choices have left us with actually two dangerous side effects. The first is that these narrowly defined jobs will be the first to be displaced by robots, because single-task robots are just the easiest kinds to build. But second, we have accidentally made it so that millions of workers around the world have unbelievably boring working lives.

Let’s take the example of a call center agent. Over the last few decades, we brag about lower operating costs because we’ve taken most of the need for brainpower out of the person and put it into the system. For most of their day, they click on screens, they read scripts. They act more like machines than humans. And unfortunately, over the next few years, as our technology gets more advanced, they, along with people like clerks and bookkeepers, will see the vast majority of their work disappear.

To counteract this, we have to start creating new jobs that are less centered on the tasks that a person does and more focused on the skills that a person brings to work. For example, robots are great at repetitive and constrained work, but human beings have an amazing ability to bring together capability with creativity when faced with problems that we’ve never seen before.

We need to realistically think about the tasks that will be disappearing over the next few years and start planning for more meaningful, more valuable work that should replace it. We need to create environments where both human beings and robots thrive. I say, let’s give more work to the robots, and let’s start with the work that we absolutely hate doing. Here, robot, process this painfully idiotic report.

And for the human beings, we should follow the advice from Harry Davis at the University of Chicago. He says we have to make it so that people don’t leave too much of themselves in the trunk of their car. I mean, human beings are amazing on weekends. Think about the people that you know and what they do on Saturdays. They’re artists, carpenters, chefs and athletes. But on Monday, they’re back to being Junior HR Specialist and Systems Analyst 3.

You know, these narrow job titles not only sound boring, but they’re actually a subtle encouragement for people to make narrow and boring job contributions. But I’ve seen firsthand that when you invite people to be more, they can amaze us with how much more they can be.

[The key is]to turn dreams into a reality. And that dreaming is an important part of what separates us from machines. For now, our machines do not get frustrated, they do not get annoyed, and they certainly don’t imagine.

But we, as human beings — we feel pain, we get frustrated. And it’s when we’re most annoyed and most curious that we’re motivated to dig into a problem and create change. Our imaginations are the birthplace of new products, new services, and even new industries.

If we really want to robot-proof our jobs, we, as leaders, need to get out of the mindset of telling people what to do and instead start asking them what problems they’re inspired to solve and what talents they want to bring to work. Because when you can bring your Saturday self to work on Wednesdays, you’ll look forward to Mondays more, and those feelings that we have about Mondays are part of what makes us human.

We’ll give the other side equal time next week.


[1] David Lee is Vice President of Innovation and the Strategic Enterprise Fund for UPS.

 

Kevin Rhodes writes about individual growth and cultural change, drawing on insights from science, technology, disruptive innovation, entrepreneurship, neuroscience, psychology, and personal experience, including his own unique journey to wellness — dealing with primary progressive MS through an aggressive regime of exercise, diet, and mental conditioning.

Check out Kevin’s latest LinkedIn Pulse article: Leadership and Life Lessons From an Elite Athlete and a Dying Man.