May 23, 2017

Bills Correcting Statutory References, Changing Child Welfare Allocations, Implementing State Engineer’s Functions, and More Signed

On Friday, March 17, 2017, the governor signed 21 bills into law. To date, he has signed 63 bills this 2017 legislative session. The bills signed Friday include a bill to update statutory references to people with disabilities, a bill outlining the procedure to correct statutory references in administrative procedural rules, a bill redetermining the child welfare allocation formula, and a bill exempting steroids injected into nonhumans from controlled substances statutes. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 17-1006“Concerning the Authorization of a Process to Correct Statutory Citations Contained in Executive Branch Agency Rules Published in the Code of Colorado Regulations without the Requirement to Follow Rule-Making Procedures,” by Rep. Mike Foote and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill allows agencies to correct statutory citations in the code of Colorado regulations without notice, comment, or a hearing by submitting to the secretary of state a specific, written determination by the attorney general.
  • HB 17-1011“Concerning a Limitation on When Certain Disciplinary Actions may be Commenced Against a Mental Health Professional, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring that a Mental Health Professional Provide Notice to Former Clients Regarding Record Retention and that All Complaints be Resolved by the Agency within Two Years after the Date the Complaint was Filed,” by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill requires that any complaint filed with the division of professions and occupations in the department of regulatory agencies against a mental health professional alleging a maintenance-of-records violation must be commenced within 7 years after the alleged act or failure to act giving rise to the complaint.
  • HB 17-1014“Concerning the Elimination of the Criminal Penalty Imposed Upon an Elector for Disclosing the Contents of the Elector’s Voted Ballot,” by Reps. Paul Rosenthal & Dave Williams and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Owen Hill. The bill deletes the ballot selfie prohibition in the Uniform Election Code provided certain conditions are met.
  • HB 17-1032“Concerning the Evidentiary Privilege for Communications Made During the Provision of Certain Peer Support Services,” by Rep. Jeni Arndt and Sen. John Cooke. The bill clarifies that privileged peer support communications need not be made during individual meetings in order to be confidential.
  • HB 17-1034“Concerning Licensing Changes to the Medical Marijuana Code to Conform with the Retail Marijuana Code,” by Rep. Dan Pabon and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill creates a requirement for a medical marijuana business operator to be licensed, and allows a medical marijuana licensee to move his or her business anywhere in Colorado upon approval of the state and local jurisdiction. The bill also allows a medical marijuana licensee to remediate its product if it contains a foreign substance.
  • HB 17-1046“Concerning Updating Statutory References to Certain Limited Outdated Terms Relating to People with Disabilities,” by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Kerry Donovan. The bill updates certain limited terms in statute that refer to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities or physical disabilities using insensitive or outdated terminology.
  • HB 17-1050“Concerning the Annual In-Service Training Required for a County Sheriff,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Daniel Kagan. The bill specifies that each sheriff undergo at least the number of hours required for all certified peace officers by the peace officers standards and training board (POST board), but in no case less than 20 hours.
  • HB 17-1052“Concerning Factors to Take Into Consideration in Determining the Child Welfare Allocation Formula in a Given Fiscal Year,” by Rep. Susan Beckman and Sen. Jim Smallwood. The bill removes certain data-gathering factors currently required to be taken into consideration in determining a fiscal year’s child welfare allocation formula for counties and replaces those with a broader scope of factors that directly affect the population of children in need of child welfare services.
  • HB 17-1054“Concerning Partnerships Between Local Governments and Military Installations, and, in Connection Therewith, Identifying Shared-Service Opportunities to Reduce Costs and Increase Efficiencies,” by Reps. Terri Carver & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill directs the department of local affairs to support cooperative intergovernmental agreements between military installations and local governments to the extent possible.
  • HB 17-1055“Concerning a Voluntary Contribution Designation Benefiting the Urban Peak Housing and Support Services for Youth Experiencing Homelessness Fund that Appears on the State Individual Tax Return Forms,” by Rep. Leslie Herod and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill creates the Urban Peak Housing and Support Services for Youth Experiencing Homelessness fund in the state treasury and adds a check-off to state tax returns for five years.
  • HB 17-1094“Concerning Modifications to the Requirements for Health Benefit Plans to Cover Health Care Services Delivered via Telehealth,” by Reps. Perry Buck & Donald Valdez and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Larry Crowder. The bill makes several changes to broaden the application of telehealth services.
  • HB 17-1105“Concerning Narrowing the Circumstances in Which Physical Inspection of a Vehicle is Required before Issuing Legal Documentation Identifying the Vehicle,” by Rep. Jon Becker and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill specifies that the department of revenue may not require physical inspection of a vehicle, including a VIN inspection, to verify information about the vehicle before registering or titling the vehicle if certain requirements are met.
  • HB 17-1137“Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by the Department of Revenue to the General Assembly,” by Reps. Dan Thurlow & Edie Hooton and Sens. Dominick Moreno & Jack Tate. The bill amends reporting requirements of the Department of Revenue.
  • HB 17-1140“Concerning Permitted Uses of Fee-for-Service Contract Money by the Colorado School of Mines,” by Rep. Jessie Danielson and Sen. Tim Neville. In addition to tuition supports, the bill allows Colorado School of Mines to use state fee-for-service contract money to fund  other services and programs, including counseling, academic support, student recruiting, and precollegiate programs.
  • SB 17-026“Concerning Requirements Governing Implementation of the State Engineer’s Functions, and, in Connection Therewith, Restructuring the Fee that the State Engineer may Charge for Rating Certain Types of Water Infrastructure, Repealing Certain Requirements, and Updating Language in the Statutes Regarding the Division of Water Resources,” by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Jeni Arndt. The bill makes several changes to the state engineer’s functions and fee requirements.
  • SB 17-030“Concerning the Exemption from the Schedules of Controlled Substances any Anabolic Steroid that is Administered through Injection into Nonhuman Species,” by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill exempts from the definition of ‘anabolic steroid’ human chorionic gonadotropin licensed for animal use only if it is expressly intended for administration through implants or injection into cattle or other nonhuman species.
  • SB 17-034“Concerning Extension of the Period Following the Declaration by the Governor of a Disaster Emergency in a County Within Which the Board of County Commissioners of the County may Transfer County General Fund Money to the County Road and Bridge Fund for the Purposes of Disaster Response and Recovery,” by Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Matt Jones and Reps. Hugh McKean & Mike Foote. The bill extends from 4 years to 8 years the period within which the board of county commissioners of the county may transfer general fund money to the road and bridge fund for disaster response and recovery.
  • SB 17-050“Concerning the Consolidation of Grant Programs Relating to Forest Management,” by Sen. John Cooke and Reps. Jeni Arndt & KC Becker. The bill transfers a forest management grant program from the Department of Natural Resources to the Forest Service, and realigns the funding for the new grant program and the healthy forest and vibrant communities fund.
  • SB 17-056“Concerning the Scheduled Repeal of Reports by the Department of Public Health and Environment to the General Assembly,” by Sen. Andy Kerr and Rep. Jeni Arndt. The bill addresses reporting requirements of the department of public health and environment.
  • SB 17-090“Concerning How to Measure the Level of Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol in Industrial Hemp,” by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush. The bill requires the commissioner of agriculture to determine the level of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol in industrial hemp by measuring the combined concentration of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol and its precursor, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid.
  • SB 17-127“Concerning an Expansion of the Exemption from the Requirements that Apply to a Mortgage Loan Originator to Include Up to Three Loans Per Year Without Compensation Between Family Members,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill expands the mortgage loan originator exemption to include up to 3 loans per year without compensation, other than interest, between family members, and directs the board of mortgage loan originators to define ‘family member’ by rule.

For a list of the governor’s legislative actions, please visit here.

SB 17-017: Allowing Use of Medical Marijuana for Stress Disorders

On January 11, 2017, Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Jonathan Singer introduced SB 17-017, “Concerning Adding Stress Disorders to the List of Debilitating Medical Conditions for the Purposes of the Use of Medical Marijuana.”

Committee on Cost-benefit Analysis of Legalized Marijuana in Colorado.

The bill adds acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of debilitating medical conditions for the purposes of the use of medical marijuana.

The bill was introduced in the Senate and assigned to the State, Veterans, & Military Affairs Committee. It is scheduled for hearing on January 30, 2017, at 1:30 p.m.

Uniform Trust Decanting Act, Governing Law for LLCs, Funding Marijuana Research, and More Bills Signed

On Monday, June 6, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 34 bills into law. Governor Hickenlooper vetoed a bill on Thursday, HB 16-1231, “Concerning the Limited Use of Automated Vehicle Identification Systems Designed to Detect Disobedience to a Traffic Signal.” To date, the governor has signed 251 bills and vetoed one bill this legislative session.

The bills signed Monday include a bill enacting the Uniform Trust Decanting Act, a bill amending requirements for limited liability companies, a bill limiting the applicability of the statute of frauds to partnerships, a bill allowing appropriations from the marijuana cash fund to finance marijuana research, and more. The bills signed Monday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1040 – Concerning Auxiliary Emergency Communications in the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing the Auxiliary Emergency Communications Unit in the Office Of Emergency Management in the Department of Public Safety, and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill creates the Auxiliary Emergency Communications Unit, which can establish programs for training auxiliary emergency communications across the state.
  • HB 16-1142 – Concerning the Creation of a Credit Against the State Income Tax for Rural Primary Care Preceptors Training Students Matriculating at Colorado Institutions of Higher Education, by Reps. Perry Buck & Joann Ginal and Sens. Larry Crowder & John Cooke. The bill creates a state income tax credit for licensed Colorado health care professionals who provide uncompensated personalized instruction, training, and supervision to one or more graduate students seeking a medical degree at a Colorado institution for higher education.
  • HB 16-1177 – Concerning the Continuation of the Council of Higher Education Representatives, by Rep. Janet Buckner & Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill extends the sunset of the Council of Higher Education Representatives until September 1, 2021.
  • HB 16-1186 – Concerning the Allocation of a Portion of Fee Revenues Collected from Public Utilities to Meet Colorado’s Grant Match Obligations Under Federal Law Governing the Funding of Fixed Rail Guideway Safety Oversight Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Max Tyler and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill diverts $150,000 of the public utility fees from the General Fund to the Fixed Utility Fund.
  • HB 16-1287 – Concerning a Requirement that the Department of Labor and Employment Study the Integration of Alternative Training by Colorado Businesses, by Reps. Paul Rosenthal & Jim Wilson and Sens. John Cooke & Andy Kefalas. The bill requires the Department of Labor and Employment to review its regulations that may impact the availability of apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programs in Colorado businesses by July 1, 2017.
  • HB 16-1329 – Concerning Laws Governing Limited Liability Companies Codified in Article 80 of Title 7 of the Colorado Revised Statutes, by Rep. Pete Lee and Sens. Mark Scheffel & Rollie Heath. The bill changes state law regarding limited liability companies, including removing the requirement that a partner’s contribution to the LLC is a prerequisite to becoming a member of the company, limits the statute of frauds, and reconciles various partnership and LLC acts.
  • HB 16-1330 – Concerning Authority to File a Correction Statement with the Secretary of State if a Document Previously Filed was Delivered to the Secretary of State for Filing in Error, by Rep. Pete Lee and Sens. Mark Scheffel & Rollie Heath. Under current law, an entity may file a statement of correction with the Secretary of State’s Office to revoke a previously filed document under certain conditions. This bill allows statements of correction to also be filed for a document that was delivered and filed in error.
  • HB 16-1332 – Concerning Modifications to the Income Tax Credits for Alternative Fuel Motor Vehicles, and, in Connection Therewith, Fixing Specified Dollar Amounts for the Credits, Allowing the Credit to be Assigned to a Financing Entity, Requiring Vehicle Identification Number Tracking of the Motor Vehicle for which the Credit is Claimed, and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Daneya Esgar and Sens. Ray Scott & Michael Johnston. The bill changes two refundable income tax credits in current law: the innovative motor vehicle credit and the innovative truck credit.
  • HB 16-1333 – Concerning Laws Governing Partnerships Codified in Title 7 of the Colorado Revised Statutes, by Rep. Pete Lee and Sens. Mark Scheffel & Rollie Heath. The bill limits the applicability of the statute of frauds to partnerships and specifies which laws govern limited partnerships.
  • HB 16-1348 – Concerning a Specific Crime of Cruelty to a Certified Police Working Dog, by Rep. Su Ryden and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill creates the crime of cruelty to a law enforcement service animal as a class 6 felony for a first offense and a class 5 felony for subsequent offenses.
  • HB 16-1349 – Concerning Continuation of the Voluntary Contribution to the Military Family Relief Fund, by Reps. Su Ryden & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Morgan Carroll. The bill extends the voluntary contribution designation benefitting the Military Family Relief Fund through tax year 2020.
  • HB 16-1368 – Concerning the Codification of Current Practice for the Management of Records of Governmental Agencies, by Rep. Max Tyler and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill clarifies and codifies the current practices of the state archivist in the Department of Personnel and Administration related to the storage and retention of state archives and public records.
  • HB 16-1373 – Concerning Requiring School Districts to Adopt a Policy Permitting the Use of Medical Marijuana by Students Authorized to Use Medical Marijuana, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sens. Chris Holbert & Vicki Marble. The bill allows school districts to adopt policies allowing medical marijuana use by students authorized to use medical marijuana.
  • HB 16-1375 – Concerning Changes to Dates for Submitting Reports that Involve the Department of Higher Education, by Reps. Jeni James Arndt & Jim Wilson and Sens. Nancy Todd & Owen Hill. Under current law, the Department of Higher Education and Department of Education are required to submit a joint report on February 1 annually. The bill changes the due date to April 1.
  • HB 16-1458 – Concerning Measures to Effectuate the Conservation of Nature Species in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Appropriations from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for Purposes Recommended by the Department of Natural Resources, by Reps. Ed Vigil & Don Coram and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Leroy Garcia. The bill appropriates $3.0 million from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for programs that are designed to conserve native species that have been listed as threatened or endangered under state or federal law, or are likely to become candidate species.
  • HB 16-1465 – Concerning Modifications to the Colorado Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, and, in Connection Therewith, Extending the Period During which the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority may Allocate Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Jon Becker and Sens. Jessie Ulibarri & John Cooke. The bill extends the number of years, from two to five years, in which the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority may allocate low-income housing income tax credits.
  • SB 16-003 – Concerning Increased Methods to Reduce Wildfire Risk, by Sens. Ellen Roberts & Matt Jones and Rep. KC Becker. The bill adds broadcast burning to the types of projects and methods for which the Department of Natural Resources may award grants from the Wildfire Risk Reduction Cash Fund, and authorizes the transfer of a total of $3.0 million into the cash fund.
  • SB 16-041 – Concerning Data Collected by the Division of Criminal Justice in the Department of Public Safety Concerning the Study of Marijuana Implementation, by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Dan Pabon. Currently, the Department of Criminal Justice is required to study law enforcement activities and costs related to the personal use and regulation of marijuana. This bill repeals the section of statute that requires the study to examine law enforcement costs and repeals the requirement that the study contain information concerning marijuana-initiated contacts by law enforcement, broken down by judicial district and by race and ethnicity.
  • SB 16-085 – Concerning the “Colorado Uniform Trust Decanting Act,” by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Yeulin Willett. The bill enacts the Uniform Trust Decanting Act in Colorado, which allows a trustee to reform an irrevocable trust document within reasonable limits that ensure the trust will achieve the settlor’s original intent. The act prevents decanting—a term to describe the distribution of assets from one trust into a second trust—when it would defeat a charitable or tax-related purpose of the settlor.
  • SB 16-087 – Concerning Funding for the Highway-Rail Crossing Signalization Fund, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Randy Baumgardner and Rep. Max Tyler. The bill creates a one-time state transfer of $240,000 from off-the-top Highway Users Tax Fund (HUTF) revenue to the Highway-Rail Crossing Signalization Fund in FY 2016-17. In FY 2017-18 and each year thereafter, the bill creates a state diversion from the General Fund.
  • SB 16-104 – Concerning Incentives to Become a Teacher in a Rural School District in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Nancy Todd & Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Jon Becker. The bill creates several new programs to provide incentives for individuals to become teachers in rural school districts, and to support the needs of professional educators in rural school districts.
  • SB 16-132 – Concerning Clarifying that Test Results Relating to Certain DUI Offenses are Not Public Information, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill requires the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to keep all personal identifying information related to blood alcohol content test results confidential, and specifies that the test results may only be released to the individual who is the subject of the test, his or her attorney, a named party in a civil or criminal case to which the test results are directly related, or a prosecuting attorney, law enforcement officer, state agency, or state and local public official legally authorized to use such information to carry out his or her duties.
  • SB 16-135 – Concerning a Pharmacist’s Provision of Health Care Services that have been Delegated by Another Health Care Provider, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Joann Ginal. The bill allows health insurance plans to provide coverage for health care services provided by a pharmacist as part of a collaborative pharmacy practice agreement if certain conditions are met. Specifically, the health plan must provide coverage for the same service if it is provided by a licensed physician or an advanced practice nurse and the pharmacist must be included in the insurers network of participating providers.
  • SB 16-146 – Concerning Modernizing Statutes Relating to Sexually Transmitted Infections, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Daneya Esgar. The bill updates state law concerning sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and allows for all STIs to be treated uniformly. It removes language specifically criminalizing HIV infection.
  • SB 16-171 – Concerning Modification and Clarification of the Statutes Pertaining to the New Energy Improvement District, by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Mark Scheffel and Reps. Max Tyler & Jon Becker. The bill requires treasurers of counties that have authorized the New Energy Improvement District program to retain a 1 percent collection fee for each NEID special assessment that it collects. The bill also requires such treasurers to distribute NEID special assessments to the NEID in the same manner, less the collection fee, as property taxes are distributed.
  • SB 16-189 – Concerning the Nonsubstantive Revision of Statutes in the Colorado Revised Statutes, as Amended, and, in Connection Therewith, Amending or Repealing Obsolete, Imperfect, and Inoperative Law to Preserve the Legislative Intent, Effect, and Meaning of the Law, by Sen. Ray Scott and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill amends or repeals obsolete, unclear, or conflicting laws. The bill also clarifies statutory language, but does not change the intent or meaning of existing statute. The bill’s appendix explains the reasons for each amendment.
  • SB 16-191 – Concerning Marijuana Research Funded by the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill authorizes the General Assembly to appropriate money from the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund to the Board of Governors of the Colorado State University System to fund scientific and social science research at CSU-Pueblo concerning marijuana and other matters that impact the state and its regions.
  • SB 16-193 – Concerning the Duties of the Safe2Tell Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Bill Cadman & Mark Scheffel and Reps. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst & Crisanta Duran. The bill requires the Department of Law to provide Safe2Tell program materials to Colorado preschools, elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, 4-H extension offices, and boys and girls clubs by August 1 of each year, beginning on June 30, 2017.
  • SB 16-195 – Concerning the Annual Appropriation of Money in the Central Fund for Veterans Centers to the State Department of Human Services, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill grants the Department of Human Services continuous spending authority from the central fund for the direct costs of the operation and administration of veterans centers, and for capital construction in connection with the centers.
  • SB 16-196 – Concerning the Creation of a Pilot Program for Inclusive Higher Education for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. John Cooke & Bill Cadman and Reps. Lois Landgraf & Dave Young. The bill creates a pilot program aimed at establishing higher education programs for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The program will operate from FY 2016-17 through FY 2020-21 at three institutions: the University of Northern Colorado, the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, and Arapahoe Community College.
  • SB 16-203 – Concerning the Evaluation of State Tax Expenditures, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Reps. Millie Hamner & Bob Rankin. The bill directs the Office of the State Auditor to conduct evaluations of all state tax expenditures, and requires the evaluations to include descriptions of the expenditure’s purpose and intended beneficiaries, whether it is accomplishing its goal, costs and benefits of the expenditure, similar expenditures in other states, other businesses or programs accomplishing the expenditure’s goals, recommended changes, and performance measures used in the evaluation.
  • SB 16-204 – Concerning the Higher Education Revenue Bond Intercept Program, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill modifies the legislative and executive branch review and conditions of participation in the higher education revenue bond intercept program.
  • SB 16-205 – Concerning Payment for Expenses of Indigent Parents, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Millie Hamner. Under current law, the Office of the State Court Administrator receives funding to pay for an indigent parent to retain one expert witness and to obtain a transcript of the trial during a parent-child termination proceeding. Given that responsibility for retaining counsel for indigent parents in such cases is now managed by the Office of the Respondent Parents’ Counsel (ORPC), this bill clarifies that funding for these expenses are to be appropriated to the ORPC.
  • SB 16-209 – Concerning Authorizing a School District Board of Education to Construct a Building for Lease to a State Institution of Higher Education, by Sens. Nancy Todd & Chris Holbert and Reps. Janet Buckner & Kevin Priola. The bill authorizes a school district board of education to lease school district property to a state institution of higher education and to accept in-kind services (such as tuition reduction or scholarships for their students) from the institution as all or part of the lease payments.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Pregnancy Accommodations Bill, CCB Transparency Bill, and More Signed by Governor

On Wednesday, June 1, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed 13 bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 217 bills this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Wednesday include a bill requiring employers to make reasonable accommodations for pregnant women, a bill to increase transparency of community-centered boards, a bill authorizing the sale of land for expansion of Fort Logan National Cemetery, and more. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1187 – Concerning a Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Meals Provided in Certain Retirement Communities, by Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill creates sales and use tax exemptions for food and food packaging to be consumed by residents on the premises of a retirement community, which includes assisted living residences, nursing homes that provide continuous nursing care, and independent living facilities providing services to residents age 55 and older.
  • HB 16-1277 – Concerning the Appeal Process for Medical Assistance Benefits, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Susan Lontine & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Andy Kefalas & Ellen Roberts. The bill requires the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to give Medicaid clients at least 10 days advanced notice prior to suspending, terminating, or modifying a client’s medical assistance benefits. The bill also extends the deadline to appeal for a client to appeal the intended action to 60 days after the date of notice, up from 30 days under current law.
  • HB 16-1280 – Concerning the Regulation of Air Ambulance Service, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Faith Winter and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill gives the CDPHE authority to establish state-level licensing of air ambulances that allows for air ambulance operators to receive a license either by gaining accreditation through an approved organization or by meeting licensing standards established by the CDPHE and the State Board of Health.
  • HB 16-1387 – Concerning Health Insurance Coverage for Severe Protein Allergic Conditions, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Laura Woods. Current law requires that health insurance plans provide coverage for medical foods for newborn children with inherited enzymatic disorders caused by single gene defects involved in the metabolism of amino, organic, and fatty acids. This bill adds coverage for severe protein allergic conditions and amino acid-based elemental formulas.
  • HB 16-1397 – Concerning the Completion of the Fitzsimmons State Veterans Community Living Center to Provide a Continuum of Residential Care Options, by Reps. Su Ryden & JoAnn Windholz and Sens. Mary Hodge & Larry Crowder. The bill repeals and reenacts the authority of the Department of Human Services to build a veterans community living center and assorted facilities on the site of the former Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and outlines the requirements for the construction and use of the facilities.
  • HB 16-1438 – Concerning the Provision of Reasonable Accommodations by an Employer for Persons Who Have a Condition Related to Pregnancy, by Rep. Faith Winter and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill requires employers to engage in a timely, good-faith, interactive process when an employee or applicant requests reasonable accommodations related to pregnancy or physical recovery from childbirth. Reasonable accommodations may include the provision of more frequent or longer break periods; more frequent bathroom, food, or water breaks; acquisition or modification of equipment or seating; limitations on lifting; temporary transfer to a less strenuous or hazardous position or light duty, if available; assistance with manual labor; or modified work schedules, as long as certain conditions are met.
  • HB 16-1456 – Concerning the Sale of a Portion of Land at the Colorado Mental Health Institute at Fort Logan to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs for the Expansion of Fort Logan National Cemetery, by Rep. Susan Lontine and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill authorizes the Department of Human Services to sell up to 15 acres of vacant land around the Colorado Mental Health Institute at Fort Logan to the United States Department of Veterans Affairs at fair market value for purpose of expanding the Fort Logan National Cemetery.
  • SB 16-027 – Concerning Allowing the Option for Medicaid Clients to Obtain Prescribed Drugs Through the Mail, and, in Connection Therewith, Reducing an Appropriation, by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Nancy Todd and Reps. Dianne Primavera & Lois Landgraf. Under current law, only a limited number of Medicaid recipients may receive maintenance medication by mail order. This bill expands the option to receive a three-month supply of maintenance medication through the mail to all Medicaid recipients.
  • SB 16-038 – Concerning Measures to Promote the Transparency of Community-Centered Boards, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Certain Community-Centered Boards Subject to Performance Audits Undertaken by the State Auditor, Making All Community-Centered Boards Subject to the “Colorado Local Government Audit Law”, Expanding Public Disclosure of the Administration and Operations of the Community-Centered Boards, and Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Reps. Dave Young & Lang Sias. The bill requires a community centered board (CCB) that receives more than 75 percent of its annual funding from federal, state, or local governments, or any combination thereof, to be subject to the Colorado Local Government Audit Act.
  • SB 16-158 – Concerning the Ability of a Physician Assistant to Perform Functions Delegated by a Physician that are Within the Physician Assistant’s Scope of Practice, by Sen. Kevin Lundberg and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill clarifies and expands the duties that a physician may delegate to a physician assistant within his or her scope of practice, including allowing a PA to issue certain statements verifying a medical condition, obtain Level I accreditation in workers’ compensation matters, and more.
  • SB 16-190 – Concerning Improving the Process for County Administration of Public Assistance Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill establishes performance standards to improve the administration of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, including requiring DHS to contract with an external vendor to collect data regarding costs and performance of several public assistance programs.
  • SB 16-202 – Concerning Increasing Access to Effective Substance Use Disorder Services Through Designated Regional Managed Service Organizations, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Dave Young. The bill requires each managed service organization to assess the sufficiency of substance use disorder services for various populations in its geographic region, and to prepare a community action plan to address the most critical service gaps by March 1, 2017. The bill allows appropriations from the Marijuana Tax Cash Fund to support the implementation of MSO community action plans and to provide substance abuse treatment.
  • SB 16-212 – Concerning Aligning Changes Made to the Federal Child Care and Development Block Grant Reauthorization of 2014 to the Twelve-Month Eligibility Requirement of the Colorado Child Care Assistance Program, by Sen. Larry Crowder and Rep. Janet Buckner. The bill makes changes to align state law on eligibility for the Colorado Child Care Assistance Program with federal law. Specifically, if an eligible participant’s income rises above the level set by the county to deny child care assistance during the twelve-month eligibility period, the county must continue providing the child care subsidy until the next twelve-month redetermination period.

For a list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding County of Residence for Judicial Nominees, Veterans’ Property Tax Exemptions, and More Signed

On Thursday, May 26, and Friday, May 27, 2016, the governor signed five bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 204 bills this legislative session. The bills signed last week include a bill modifying the definition of “disabled veteran” as it relates to the property tax exemption, a bill encouraging judicial nominating commissions to give preference to licensed attorneys who reside in the county where the vacancy is to occur, and more. Last week’s bills are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1462 – Concerning a Modification to the Provisions Enacted in House Bill 11-1155 to Authorize Combining the Full-Time Equivalent Employment of the Lieutenant Governor and the State Chief Operating Officer, by Rep. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Cheri Jahn. The bill allows the Lieutenant Governor to serve as the state’s Chief Operating Officer (COO) through the end of the current term of office, January 10, 2019.
  • HB 16-1289 – Concerning Incentives for Local Education Providers to Encourage High School Students to Successfully Complete Career Development Course Work, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Daneya Esgar and Sens. Larry Crowder & Leroy Garcia. The bill creates the Career Development Success Pilot Program, which is designed to provide financial incentives for participating districts and charter schools to encourage high school students to enroll in and successfully complete qualified industry-certificate programs, internship or preapprenticeship programs, and advanced placement courses.
  • HB 16-1444 – Concerning the Definition of a “Qualifying Disabled Veteran” as it Relates to a Property Tax Exemption for Such Individuals, by Reps. Su Ryden & Terri Carver and Sens. Andy Kefalas & Larry Crowder. The bill expands the definition of “Qualifying Disabled Veteran” for the Colorado property tax exemption to include veterans with a full medical retirement.
  • SB 16-134 – Concerning Professional Licensing for Military Veterans in Certain Professions, by Sens. Rollie Heath & Leroy Garcia and Reps. Jessie Danielson & Daniel Kagan. The bill requires that a military veteran’s service experience be considered toward commercial driver’s license qualifications, and the Department of Revenue must consider a military veteran’s training, education, or experience during the CDL licensing process, and may provide credit toward a CDL for those qualifications.
  • SB 16-153 – Concerning Nominees for County Court Judges, by Sen. Larry Crowder and Rep. Jim Wilson. The bill encourages judicial nominating commissions to give preference for judicial vacancies to licensed attorneys who reside within the county in which the vacancy occurs.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding Residential Drug Treatment for Probationers, Enhancing Cybersecurity, and More Signed

On Friday, May 20, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law. To date, he has signed 199 bills this legislative session. Some of the bills signed Friday include a bill to extend the transitional jobs program, a bill to allow persons on probation for any offense to engage in residential drug treatment, and a bill to increase state cybersecurity. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • HB 16-1097 – Concerning Regulation of Medicaid Nonemergency Transportation Providers, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation, by Reps. Don Coram & Dominick Moreno and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill allows providers of non-emergency transportation to Medicaid clients to operate under a limited regulation permit from the Public Utilities Commission.
  • HB 16-1197 – Concerning a Requirement that State Agencies Implement a Program to Streamline the Granting of Occupational Credentials to Veterans Based on Military Training, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Terri Carver & Jovan Melton and Sens. Nancy Todd & Larry Crowder. The bill requires each state agency that certifies, licenses, or registers an occupation to publish a summary of pathways available to military veterans by evaluating the extent to which military training meets state requirements, identifying reciprocity mechanisms in other states, and determining if occupational examinations are available that authorize a veteran to practice; consult with community colleges and other post-secondary education institutions about courses or programs that fill the gap between military and civilian occupational training, and refresher courses for lapsed occupational training; and consider adopting a national credentialing examination.
  • HB 16-1267 – Concerning the “Colorado Veterans’ Service-to-Career Pilot Program”, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating a Grant Program Through the Department of Labor and Employment to Aid Work Force Centers in Supporting Veterans and their Spouses Seeking New Employment and Careers, and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Pete Lee & Rhonda Fields and Sens. Laura Woods & Morgan Carroll. The bill creates the Colorado Veterans’ Service-to-Career Pilot Program. Through CDLE and in partnership with nonprofit agencies, workforce centers throughout the state may apply for grants to develop and expand career services for veterans, spouses, and eligible participants. Eligible participants include a veteran’s dependent child under age 27 and a veteran’s caregiver over age 18.
  • HB 16-1278 – Concerning Residential Drug Treatment for Persons on Probation, by Rep. Pete Lee and Sen. John Cooke. The bill allows the court to require a defendant to participate in drug treatment when sentenced to probation for any offense, rather than just drug offenses.
  • HB 16-1288 – Concerning the Creation of an Industry Infrastructure Grant Program Within the State Work Force Development Council, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Jack Tate & Michael Merrifield. The bill creates the Industry Infrastructure Grant Program within the Colorado Workforce Development Council (CWDC). The purpose of the program is for the CWDC to partner with eligible nonprofit entities to develop industry competency standards to support businesses in their implementation of work site training programs.
  • HB 16-1290 – Concerning an Extension of the Transitional Jobs Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Daneya Esgar & Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sens. Andy Kerr & Owen Hill. The bill extends the sunset of the transitional jobs program until June 30, 2022, and requires the Department of Human Services to stop offering transitional jobs after December 31, 2021.
  • HB 16-1453 – Concerning Measures to Enhance Cybersecurity, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill creates the Colorado Cybersecurity Council in the Department of Public Safety, which is to operate as a steering group to develop cybersecurity policy guidance for the Governor; develop comprehensive goals, requirements, initiatives, and milestones; and to coordinate with the General Assembly and the Judicial Department regarding cybersecurity.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2016 legislative decisions, click here.

SB 16-134: Allowing Qualified Military Veterans Access to Professional Licenses

On February 18, 2016, Sens. Rollie Heath & Leroy Garcia and Reps. Jessie Danielson & Daniel Kagan introduced SB 16-134Concerning Professional Licensing for Military Veterans in Certain Professions. The bill was assigned to the Senate Business, Labor, & Technology Committee, where it was amended. The bill passed through the Senate with amendments on Second Reading, and was introduced into the House Business Affairs & Labor Committee. The bill was unamended in the House committee and referred to the House Committee of the Whole for Second Reading.

First, this bill requires the Department of Revenue to consider the training, education, or experience obtained by an applicant as a member of the U.S. armed forces, reserves, or National Guard, and the Department of Revenue may credit the training, education, or experience toward the qualifications necessary to receive a license, certification, or registration.

Second, this bill requires the Division of Veteran Affairs within the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs to make reasonable efforts to notify discharged members of the armed services who are located in – or who intend to relocate to – Colorado of the requirements enacted by this bill and enforced by the Department of Revenue, as well as the requirements in C.R.S. § 24-34-102(8) and (8.5), enforced by the Division of Professions and Occupations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies.

Max Montag is a 2016 J.D. Candidate at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

HB 16-1112: Creating a Pilot Program to Teach Veterans to Train Their Own Service Dogs

On January 20, 2016, Rep. Lois Landgraf and Sen. Larry Crowder introduced HB 16-1112 – Concerning the Creation of the Training Veterans to Train Their Own Service Dogs Pilot Program. The bill was introduced in the House Public Health Care & Human Services Committee, where it passed, amended, and was referred to the Appropriations Committee.

This bill creates the Training Veterans to Train Their Own Service Dogs Pilot Program, and the Training Veterans to Train Their own Service Dogs Pilot Program Fund. The bill establishes that the Executive Director of the Department of Human Resources shall establish and post criteria, including eligibility criteria, for the Program, as well as establish guidelines and timelines for a request for proposals process to select a nonprofit entity to facilitate the Program.

The purpose of the Program is to identify and train a group of up to ten eligible veterans to pair with dogs, as identified by qualified canine trainers in conjunction with the veterans, to foster, train, and ultimately utilize the dogs as their own service or companion animals. A veteran is eligible for the program if he or she served in and was honorably discharged from the armed forces, national guard, or reserved forces, is in need of mental heath services, and received a referral to participate in the Program from a qualified mental health professional. The Program will offer those veterans who graduate from the Program the opportunity to expand the Program by identifying, fostering, and training a subsequent dog for another eligible veteran who is unable to complete one or more parts of the process due to physical limitations. The Department must establish and post eligibility criteria for the selection to the Program of veterans and canines to be used by the selected nonprofit.

The Executive Director shall establish and use a competitive request for proposals process to select a nonprofit agency to implement and operate the Program. To be eligible, the nonprofit must: be based in Colorado, generate its own revenue and reinvest the proceeds in the development of its programs, and serve the needs of the veteran population in its geographic region, for example, by offering veterans support programs. The nonprofit shall: report to the Department measurable outcomes and evaluations of those outcomes of the Program, select the veterans and canine companions, assist in conducting the Program, and provide mentoring to a participating veteran.

The Department shall report the outcomes and evaluations of the Program to a number of Committees of the State Senate and House of Representatives.

The Fund is created in the state treasury, funded by the General Assembly, for the purpose of funding the Program. The Department is authorized to seek, accept, and expend gifts and donations, from private or public sources, for the purposes of the Program.

Max Montag is a 2016 J.D. Candidate at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.

Bills Regarding Military Employment Services, Voting Rights, Disabled Veteran License Plates, and More Signed

On Wednesday, May 27, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed six bills into law. To date, the governor has signed 258 bills into law. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1030 – Concerning the Establishment of an Employment Services for Veterans Pilot Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Lois Landgraf and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill creates the Employment Services for Veterans Pilot Program, including veterans services related to job retention, employment mediation, mentoring, and career counseling.
  • HB 15-1181 – Concerning the Exemption from the State Income Tax of Active Duty Military Income Earned by a Resident Individual in the Armed Forces of the United States, by Rep. Jon Keyser and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill allows an armed forces member on active duty whose residence is in Colorado to receive a tax deduction from state taxable income.
  • HB 15-1026 – Concerning the Issuance of Military License Plates with an Identifying Figure Notifying the Public that the Holder May Use Reserved Parking for People with Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Kit Roupe and Sen. Nancy Todd. The bill allows the Department of Revenue to create disabled veteran license plates.
  • HB 15-1327 – Concerning Limitations on Proxy Marriages, by Reps. Joann Ginal & Kit Roupe and Sens. Leroy Garcia & John Cooke. The bill limits proxy marriage in Colorado to military personnel and military contractors.
  • HB 15-1045 – Concerning the Amount a Veteran Must Pay to Enter State Parks, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Su Ryden and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires state parks to grant free admission to active duty military personnel and military veterans during the month of August.
  • HB 15-1130 – Concerning Voting by Active Military and Overseas Voters in Municipal Elections, and, in Connection Therewith, Extending Certain Deadlines that Govern the Conduct of Municipal Elections to Ensure that Such Voters have the Same Ability to Vote in Such Elections as they do in Federal, State, and County Elections, by Reps. Dan Nordberg & Su Ryden and Sens. Leroy Garcia & Owen Hill. The bill aligns municipal election code with federal military voting acts to ensure U.S. citizens living abroad can vote.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding Endangered Species Preservation, Career Training, and More Signed

On Friday, May 22, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law, and on Tuesday, May 26, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed four bills into law. To date, he has signed 252 bills into law this legislative session. The bills signed Friday and Tuesday are summarized here.

Friday, May 22, 2015

  • HB 15-1321 – Concerning Measures to Support Rural School Districts, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & Jim Wilson and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Kerry Donovan. The bill provides administrative flexibility for funding for small rural school districts.
  • HB 15-1277 – Concerning Measures to Effectuate the Conservation of Native Species in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Appropriations from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for Purposes Recommended by the Department of Natural Resources, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill transfers funds for the purpose of conserving native species that are threatened or endangered.
  • SB 15-199 – Concerning the Continuation of the Funding for the Habitat Partnership Program in the Division of Parks and Wildlife, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill continues a program that transfers moneys from big game licenses to the Habitat Partnership Cash Fund.
  • SB 15-226 – Concerning the Education Requirements Necessary to Qualify for a License to Take Wildlife, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill allows the Parks and Wildlife Commission to establish alternatives to a mandatory hunter education course.
  • HB 15-1315 – Concerning Support for County Veterans Service Officers, by Rep. Su Ryden and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill eliminates a requirement that counties match DMVA funding for county veterans service officers.
  • HB 15-1307 – Concerning a Modification in the Definition of the Term “Qualified Commercial Structure” as the Term is Used in the “Colorado Job Creation and Main Street Revitalization Act”, by Rep. Daneya Esgar and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill changes the definition of a qualified commercial structure for purposes of the historic preservation tax credit.
  • HB 15-1275 – Concerning Measures to Support Enrollment in Career and Technical Education Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Faith Winter and Sens. Rollie Heath & Vicki Marble. The bill clarifies that career and technical course work related to apprenticeship and internship programs may be used for concurrent enrollment.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

  • HB 15-1170 – Concerning Measures to Raise the Level of Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness that Colorado Students Demonstrate upon Graduation from High School, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Jim Wilson and Sens. Owen Hill & Rollie Heath. The bill adds a requirement of consideration of college enrollment to statistical performance indicator data.
  • HB 15-1180 – Concerning the Creation of a State Sales and Use Tax Refund for Tangible Personal Property that is Used in Colorado for Research and Development by a Qualified Medical Technology or Clean Technology Taxpayer, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Jim Wilson and Sens. Rollie Heath & Chris Holbert. The bill creates a sales and use tax refund for equipment used in clean technology and medical device firms with 35 or fewer employees.
  • HB 15-1230 – Concerning the Creation of the Innovative Industries Workforce Development Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Pete Lee & Mike Foote and Sens. Rollie Heath & John Cooke. The bill creates the Innovative Industries Workforce Development Program to reimburse employers with high-level internships and apprenticeships in innovative industries.
  • HB 15-1276 – Concerning the Creation of a Matching Grant Program to Facilitate Recruitment for Skilled Worker Training Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Angela Williams and Sens. John Cooke & Rollie Heath. The bill creates the Skilled Worker Outreach, Recruitment, and Key Training Grant Program to offer grants for training skills that are needed in the workplace and to provide a certificate upon completion.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Water Right Quantification, Earned Time for Certain Offenders, and More Bills Signed

On Monday, May 4, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law. He signed one more bill on Tuesday, May 5, 2015. To date, the governor has signed 184 bills into law. The bills signed on May 4 and 5 are summarized here.

May 4, 2015

  • HB 15-1239 – Concerning an Exception to the Prohibition Against Paying Postemployment Compensation for the Denver Health and Hospital Authority, by Reps. Beth McCann & Susan Lontine and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill removes the Denver Health and Hospital Authority from the list of government agencies prohibited from offering post-employment compensation to employees who have been terminated.
  • HB 15-1203 – Concerning Earned Time for Certain Offenders Serving Life Sentences as Habitual Offenders, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill allows offenders sentenced before July 1, 1993 for crimes committed after July 1, 1985 to accrue earned time.
  • HB 15-1215 – Concerning In-State Tuition Classification for Dependents of Active Duty Military Members who have Attended School in Colorado, by Rep. Kevin Priola and Sen. Michael Johnston. The bill allows an institute of higher education to provide in-state tuition to active duty military members.
  • HB 15-1218 – Concerning Requiring Certain Disclosures by Defense-Initiated Victim Outreach Specialists, by Rep. Rhonda Fields and Sen. Michael Johnston. The bill specifies parameters for defense-initiated victim outreach in cases involving a Class 1 felony.
  • HB 15-1220 – Concerning Response to Sexual Assault on Campuses of Colorado’s Institutions of Higher Education, by Reps. Jessie Danielson & Su Ryden and Sens. John Cooke & Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill requires institutions of higher education to create Memoranda of Understanding with local hospitals to provide sexual assault examinations.
  • HB 15-1136 – Concerning the Number of Disabled Veteran License Plates with the Identifying Figure Authorizing the Use of Parking Privileges that May Be Issued to a Qualified Individual, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Clarice Navarro and Sen. Laura Woods. The bill increases the number of disabled veteran license plates available to two sets of place per veteran.
  • SB 15-183 – Concerning the Quantification of the Historical Consumptive Use of a Water Right, by Sens. Mary Hodge & Jerry Sonnenberg and Reps. Jeni James Arndt & Jon Becker. The bill specifies use periods for a judicial decree of historical consumptive use of a water right.

May 5, 2015

  • SB 15-225 – Concerning the Governance Structure of the State Historical Society, and, in Connection Therewith, Changing the Method of Appointment of a Board of Directors and Creating a Directors Council, by Sens. Chris Holbert & Nancy Todd and Reps. Su Ryden & Lori Saine. The bill changes the procedures for electing members to the board of directors for the Colorado State Historical Society.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

e-Legislative Report: April 22, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For readers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (LPC) is the CBA’s legislative policy-making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions on requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

The following bills were discussed at the LPC last week. Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

HB 15-1327—Limit Proxy Marriages To Military & Contractors
Sponsors: Rep. Ginal (D), Rep. Roupe (R) & Sen. Cooke (R), Sen. Garcia (D)
The LPC reviewed this legislation (which had passed through its first committee hearing on Thursday, April 16). The consensus of Bar members and sections weighing in was that this bill was an important tool to fight trafficking and to restrain the statute to its original intent (marriage to military personnel and related contactors). The Bar will work with the sponsors to secure passage as the bill moves forward.

HB 15-1359—Savings Program For Persons With Disabilities
Sponsors: Rep. Danielson (D), Rep. Landgraf (R) & Sen. Kefalas (D), Sen. Martinez Humenik (R)
The LPC voted to support this legislation at the request and analysis of the Elder Law Section. The bill authorizes the Department of Higher Education to set up a 529 like savings program for individuals with disabilities—and parallels work that the section was already doing. This bill is supported by the department, and has a favorable path at this point in the session.

Bills that the LPC is monitoring, watching or working on can be found at this link on Priority Bill Track.

At the Capitol—Week of April 10

HB 15-1218—No Contact With Defense-initiated Victim Outreach 
We reached out to the sponsors to communicate that the CBA supported the American Bar Association’s position on this (and similar bills in other states) Bill was amended and made better. No LPC action needed.

HB 15-1285—Law Enforcement Use Of Body-worn Cameras 

HB 15-1286—Police Misconduct Court Require Prosecution

HB 15-1290—Stop Police Interference Cop Incident Recording
The CBA supports these three bills and they are moving forward in the legislative process. The LPC discussed and reviewed the “police package” of legislation, ultimately taking a position in support of these bills as aligned with the advancement of the practice of law.

SB 15-129—Preserving Parent-Child relationships 
This bill was heard in committee on April 16. The bar, through its Family Law section and the LPC was opposed to the bill insofar as it turned the long standing “best interest of the child standard” on its head—substituting the rights of divorcing parents as the preeminent consideration in awarding parenting time. There wasa great deal of testimony (26 opponents and 17 proponents), and after 7 hours of testimony it was PI’d 9 to 4. The Bar was a key opponent and our testimony was very persuasive.

SB 15-181—Immediate Appeal Order Appointing Receiver
This bill has been calendared in the House. We continue to work to oppose the bill notwithstanding the many amendments that have carved out various constituencies and interests. The position of the Bar is that this is not well crafted legislation—and the wrong approach to addressing a legitimate problem.

New Bill of Interest

There are several new bills introduced each week of the session (even with only two weeks left). This is one that each lawyer will want to be aware of:

HB 15-1371—Exempt Lawyer Trust Acct Funds From Unclaimed Prop
Sponsors: Rep. Pabon (D), Rep. Willett (R) & Sen. Johnston

The bill creates an exemption from the “Unclaimed Property Act” for funds held in Colorado lawyer trust account foundation trust accounts, commonly known as lawyer COLTAF trust accounts.