August 22, 2017

Ethical Issues for Lawyers Serving on Nonprofit Boards

nonprofitLawyers are invited to join the boards of nonprofit corporations for a variety of reasons, the best of which relate to the judgment and analytical and communication skills lawyers may bring to bear. Service on nonprofit boards, however, often presents lawyers with irresistible opportunities to their exercise their legal training, with potential ethical implications.

One of the primary ethical concerns for attorneys serving on nonprofit boards is whether the attorney is perceived as representing the organization or actually represents the organization. Lawyers serving on nonprofit boards must take care to avoid establishing an accidental attorney-client relationship. If a lawyer does not want to enter into an accidental attorney-client relationship, he or she would be wise to make it clear from the beginning of his or her service, perhaps in writing, that there is no attorney-client relationship. Similarly, attorneys serving on nonprofit boards should emphasize their roles to the other board members.

Conflicts of interest are another ethical pitfall for attorneys serving on nonprofit boards. The lawyer’s independent professional judgment may be compromised by his or her obligation to respect the conduct of the organization regardless of whether that conduct complies with the Colorado Rules of Professional Conduct. There is also the potential for conflict between the organization and the attorney’s law firm.

Although serving on boards of directors for nonprofit organizations presents unique ethical concerns, attorneys provide valuable contributions to boards. Good practices, such as clarifying the lawyer’s role before beginning board service or refraining from voting on issues involving the lawyer’s firm, can help avoid ethical dilemmas.

Ericka Houck Englert, Of Counsel at Davis Graham & Stubbs, will present a one-hour lunch program on December 20, 2016, to discuss ethics for attorneys sitting on nonprofit boards. Register by calling (303) 860-0608, or click the links below.

 

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CLE Program: Ethical Issues for Attorneys Serving on Nonprofit Boards

This CLE presentation will occur on December 20, 2016, at the CBA-CLE offices (1900 Grant Street, Third Floor), from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Register for the live program here or register for the webcast here. You may also call (303) 860-0608 to register.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here: MP3Video OnDemand.

e-Legislative Report, 5/6/13

CBA Director of Legislative Relations Michael Valdez issued his weekly e-Legislative Report on May 6, 2013. In this edition, he gives a day-by-day report of what happened at the legislature during the week of April 29. He also summarizes a few more late bills of interest, and notes that the CBA Legislative Policy Committee did not meet on May 3.

At the Capitol

Boxscores

Monday, April 29

  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1058. Concerning guidelines for the determination of spousal maintenance (advisory guideline formula to determine spousal maintenance). The adoption of the conference committee report signals the end of the legislative journey for the bill; the bill now heads to Gov. John Hickenlooper for action. The final Senate version of the bill is what the Governor will see when the bill gets to his desk.
  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1204. Concerning the “Uniform Premarital and Marital Agreements Act.” The conference committee report made a conforming amendment to the act to address changes made in SB 13-11. Civil Unions.
  • The House adopted the conference committee report for HB 13-1200. Concerning the “Uniform Deployed Parents Custody and Visitation Act.” The conference committee report adopted several important amendments suggested by the Family Law Section.
  • The House adopted HB 13-1317. Concerning the recommendations made in the public process for the purpose of implementing retail marijuana legalized by section 16 of article XVIII of the Colorado constitution, and in connection therewith, making an appropriation on 3rd Reading by a vote of 35 yes, 29, no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate approved 13-1246. Concerning modifications in connection with current property tax exemptions for nonprofit organizations on 3rd and final reading by a vote of 35–0.
  • The Senate approved 13-255. Concerning child fatality review teams, and, in connection therewith, increasing the capacity and resources, clarifying the responsibilities and processes of state and local child fatality review teams in the departments of public health and environment and human services, and making an appropriation on a 22–13 vote.

Tuesday, April 30

  • The Senate adopted HB 1163. Concerning payment for medical costs associated with obtaining a medical forensic examination for victims of sexual offenses, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on 3rd Reading on a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate approved HB 12-1276. Concerning limitations on the actions a unit owners’ association under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” may take against a unit owner with respect to the collection of debt owed to the unit owners’ association by a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate passed 13-1142. Concerning reforms to the “Urban and Rural Enterprise Zone Act,” and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 21–14.
  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1156. Concerning creation of an adult diversion program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a 35–0 vote.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1138. Concerning benefit corporations, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a party line vote 20–15. The bill was sent back to the House for consideration of the Senate amendments.
  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1134. Concerning unit owners’ associations under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” on a party line vote of 20–15.
  • The Senate unanimously approved SB 13-271. Concerning funding for the address confidentiality program on 3rd and final reading.
  • With a smidgen of bipartisan support, the Senate gave final approval of HB 13-1266. Concerning the alignment of state health insurance laws with the requirements of the federal “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” on a vote of 21–14.
  • The Senate adopted on 3rd and final Reading HB 13-1082. Concerning juvenile delinquency records on a 35–0 vote.
  • The House gave final approval of SB 13-252. Concerning measures to increase Colorado’s renewable energy standard so as to encourage the deployment of methane capture technologies on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House adopted HB 13-1318. Concerning the recommendations made in the public process for the purpose of implementing certain state taxes on retail marijuana legalized by section 16 of article XVIII of the Colorado constitution, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House approved HB 13-1306. Concerning creating a task force to consider persons who pose a threat of harm to themselves or others on 3rd and final reading; the vote: 35 yes, 29 no, and 1 excused.

Wednesday, May 1

  • The House adopted—34 yes, 28 no, and one excused—HB 13-1316. Concerning the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission’s adoption of uniform statewide groundwater sampling rules, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation.
  • The House approved SB 13-47. Concerning protections for youth in foster care against identity theft, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 63 yes, 1 no, and one excused.
  • The House approved 13-246. Concerning creation of a task force to study discovery costs in criminal case by a vote of 64 yes, 1 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House adopted HB 13-111. Concerning abuse of at-risk adults, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation by a vote of 56 yes, 8 no, and 1 absent.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1138. Concerning benefit corporations, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The Senate amendments to the bill represent a significant compromise on the bill. The motion to concur with Senate amendments was passed on a vote of 37 yes, 27 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1276. Concerning limitations on the actions a unit owners’ association under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” may take against a unit owner with respect to the collection of debt owed to the unit owners’ association; the vote: 47 yes, 17 no, and 1 excused.
  • The House voted to concur with the amendments added by the Senate to HB 13-1156. Concerning creation of an adult diversion program, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote of 61 yes, 3 no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate gave its final approval to 13-250. Concerning changes to sentencing of persons convicted of drug crimes, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The final vote was 34–1.
  • The Senate gave final approval to SB 13-244. Concerning a task force to study substance abuse. The final vote was 34–1.

Thursday, May 2

  • The Senate adopted HB 13-1230. Concerning compensation for persons who are exonerated of their crimes after a period of incarceration, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote 32 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1240. Concerning penalties for persistent drunk drivers, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation on a vote 32 yes, 0 no, and 3 excused.
  • Adopted on a vote of 33 yes, 1, no, and 1 excused, the Senate gave final support for HB 13-1160. Concerning criminal theft, and, in connection therewith, reducing an appropriation.
  • The Senate gave final approval of SB 13-283. Concerning implementation of amendment 64, and, in connection therewith, making and reducing an appropriation. The vote was 32 yes, 2, no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate voted to concur with the House amendments to SB 13-111. Concerning abuse of at-risk adults, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation (Mandatory reporting of elder abuse). The vote to concur was 24 yes, 10 no, and 1 excused.
  • The Senate voted to concur with the House amendments to SB 13-147. Concerning protections for youth in foster care against identity theft, and, in connection therewith, making an appropriation. The vote to concur was 34 yes, 0 no, and 1 excused.

Friday, May 3

  • The House gave final approval to SB 13-262. Concerning the exemption of representative services of enrolled agents from the definition of debt management services. The vote was unanimous—65-0.
  • On 3rd and final reading, the House adopted HB 13-1323. Concerning requiring the department of corrections to obtain clarification if a court-issued mittimus omits instruction concerning whether a defendant’s sentences are to be served consecutively or concurrently on a vote of 65–0.
  • The Senate gave final approval to HB 13-1284, Concerning documents that can be filed regarding security interests under the “Uniform Commercial Code.”

The full e-Legislative Report, including summaries of late bills of interest, can be found here.

HB 13-1246: Allowing Property Tax Exemptions for Property Used for Charitable Purposes

On March 4, 2013, Rep. Lois Court and Sen. Pat Steadman introduced HB 13-1246 – Concerning Modifications in Connection with Current Property Tax Exemptions for Nonprofit Organizations. This summary is published here courtesy of the Colorado Bar Association’s e-Legislative Report.

Tax exempt property acquired by nonprofit housing provider for low-income housing: Current law allows a property tax exemption for real property acquired by a nonprofit housing provider upon which the provider intends to construct or rehabilitate housing to be sold to a low-income applicant. The bill modifies the property tax exemption by also allowing it to apply to real property acquired by a nonprofit housing provider that the provider intends to sell to a low-income applicant for the purpose of constructing or rehabilitating housing for the low-income applicant’s residential use.

In addition, the bill changes the criteria to qualify as a low-income applicant from an individual or family whose total median income is no greater than 60 percent of the area median income to an individual or family whose total median income is no greater than 80 percent of the area median income.

Waiver of filing deadline for annual report from owners of tax-exempt property: An owner of property that is exempt from property tax as determined by the property tax administrator is required to file an annual report to the state board of equalization (state board) regarding the tax-exempt property. Currently, the state board may waive the filing deadline for the annual report under certain circumstances. The bill allows the state board to determine a deadline for the property owner to file the report when granting the waiver and specifies that the waiver is invalid after the date established by the state board.

Effective date of property tax exemptions when a public official has made an error: The property tax administrator is currently authorized to grant a property tax exemption for certain types of property. The property tax administrator may grant the exemption back to Jan. 1 of the year preceding the year in which the application was filed, but no earlier. The bill allows the state board to authorize the property tax administrator to make an exemption effective earlier than is currently allowed when the property has been added back to the tax roll as omitted property and would otherwise have met all criteria for exemption during the time that it was omitted.

On March 27, the House gave final approval to the bill on 3rd Reading; the bill has not been assigned to a committee in the Senate.

Since this summary, the bill has been assigned to the Finance Committee in the Senate.

Crowdfunding: A New Means For Start-up Capital (Part 2 of 2)

This is Part 2 of a two-part series. Click here for Part 1.

On April 5, 2012, President Barack Obama signed The JOBS Act (“Act”) into law and Title III of the Act empowers the SEC to set rules for companies to raise capital through crowdfunding. Crowdfunding will permit entrepreneurs to advertise and seek financing from the general public in relatively small amounts in exchange for an interest in their company. These provisions present great opportunity for new companies and investors alike because start-ups can seek capital from a broad pool of investors and investors can seek financial return through the internet from a company that resonates with them. Permitting a diverse group of unaccredited investors as a shareholder base in a company is a large change in securities regulation.

However, there are significant concerns as to whether the SEC will set rules providing adequate flexibility. Currently, Title III of the Act substantially burdens both issuers and funding portals. Regarding issuers, a sweeping scope of individuals in the company must sacrifice limited liability: directors, partners, principal executive officers, principal financial officers, controller, or any person who offers or sells the security in the offering.  Regarding funding portals, there will be financial costs in providing administrative aid to investors and registering with the SEC. Finally, the language in the Act provides for much disclosure and many regulations that do not significantly depart from current requirements for companies at the IPO stage. For both issuers and funding portals, the regulatory costs may be too great.

Additionally, companies will face uncertainties surrounding later rounds of financing and subsequent restructuring if they decide to crowdfund. It will be vitally important for a company to consider the impact that crowdfunding will have on its projected funding model and its ultimate exit strategy. First, companies should consider whether they plan to seek funding from angel investors, venture capitalists, or other traditional sources because such sources might balk at getting involved with a broad base of unaccredited investors. Second, companies should consider that many restructuring plans require a degree of shareholder approval and such shareholder approval could prove difficult and expensive with a crowdfunded shareholder base. Although speculative, these concerns should be contemplated with each client.

Crowdfunding is an exciting legal development that attorneys should monitor as they advise their business clients. The interest surrounding this funding model is justified because crowdfunding has the potential to change the capital raising landscape for start-up companies overlooked by traditional funding sources. Yet, it remains to be seen whether the SEC will implement rules that address current concerns regarding financial costs and issuer liability. Additionally, companies who seek angel or venture capital funding need to be aware of the pragmatic consequences from accepting funds from the general public. In sum, when the rules are promulgated by the SEC crowdfunding should be considered as a potential funding source for start-up companies, but careful scrutiny should be paid to clients’ future plans.

Joel Jacobson is a Contracts and Operations Associate with H.B. Stubbs Company, LCC – a national design and fabrication firm headquartered near Detroit, MI for exhibits displayed by technology and automotive companies. He focuses on contracts, employment law, and a variety of non-legal business issues. Joel serves on the Executive Council of the Denver Bar Association Young Lawyers Division and has an interest in topics impacting start-up companies in the Denver entrepreneurial community. He can be reached by email at jmjacobson1@gmail.com or on Twitter @J_m_Jacobson.

The opinions and views expressed by Featured Bloggers on CBA-CLE Legal Connection do not necessarily represent the opinions and views of the Colorado Bar Association, the Denver Bar Association, or CBA-CLE, and should not be construed as such.

Crowdfunding: A New Means For Start-up Capital (Part 1 of 2)

This is the first part of a two-part series. Stay tuned for Part 2.

Between the Colorado Business Law Institute and Denver Startup Week, October was ripe with exciting events for attorneys in Denver interested in the entrepreneurial community. After speaking with attorneys and entrepreneurs alike, it is clear that great interest exists surrounding the forthcoming federal regulations in The JOBS Act (“Act”) pertaining to “crowdfunding.”  Although there is hope that this funding model will be a great source of capital for wanting entrepreneurs, legitimate concerns exist that regulations will be too strict when implemented at the Federal level.  This two-part piece will briefly introduce the idea of crowdfunding, explore how it fits with traditional start-up financing options, and identify potential issues.

Crowdfunding will enable companies to raise capital by seeking funding from a large number of unaccredited investors in relatively small amounts without violating SEC registration and solicitation rules. Title III of the Act specifically permits companies to leverage the internet for this purpose through “funding portals.” At its core, crowdfunding is a simple idea. By way of example, it will enable entrepreneurs from various geographic locations to advertise the efficacy of their start-up entity through social media outlets to individuals in Denver, among other locations, and an interested Denverite could then invest limited funds with that start-up entity. As a result, a wider base of capital will exist for start-up companies to tap into, thereby complementing traditional funding avenues. This is important because less than two percent of start-up companies are ultimately funded by traditional angel investors or venture capitalists.

Crowdfunding rules and regulations are currently being debated and will be issued by the SEC in 2013 – nothing is final yet. As it stands, Title III of the Act will permit participating companies to sell up to $1 million in securities while remaining exempt from the requirements of Section 5 of the Securities Act. In addition to this cap, proposed restrictions on investors will limit crowdfunding investing to an amount tied to their annual income or net worth. Despite these restrictions, this is an exciting shift in the investment paradigm for entrepreneurs because the new rules will remove the strict restrictions on companies advertising and selling securities to unaccredited investors. Instead, companies will be able to solicit investments directly from unaccredited investors through an intermediary funding portal.

Crowdfunding is not a new idea. Rewards-based crowdfunding has been in existence for years without violating SEC rules and is popular for philanthropic and entrepreneurial causes. In this model, individuals invest money with a company or individual, but only as a donation or for some type of reward – there is no expectation of financial profit. Additionally, some companies are beginning to use existing state securities laws which exist in many states, including Colorado, to setup investment crowdfunding platforms that carefully work within the federal framework. This is a detailed topic beyond the scope of this entry.

This is Part 1 of a two-part series. Stay tuned for Part 2.

Joel Jacobson is a Contracts and Operations Associate with H.B. Stubbs Company, LCC – a national design and fabrication firm headquartered near Detroit, MI for exhibits displayed by technology and automotive companies. He focuses on contracts, employment law, and a variety of non-legal business issues. Joel serves on the Executive Council of the Denver Bar Association Young Lawyers Division and has an interest in topics impacting start-up companies in the Denver entrepreneurial community. He can be reached by email at jmjacobson1@gmail.com or on Twitter @J_m_Jacobson.

The opinions and views expressed by Featured Bloggers on CBA-CLE Legal Connection do not necessarily represent the opinions and views of the Colorado Bar Association, the Denver Bar Association, or CBA-CLE, and should not be construed as such.

Second Annual Strikes for Tykes Event on Saturday, November 3, 2012

On November 3,2012 the Community Action Network of the Denver Bar Association will present the second annual Strikes for Tykes bowling event to raise funds for Children’s Outreach Project, a non-profit, therapeutic preschool and child care center serving north Denver and the surrounding communities. The vision of Children’s Outreach Project is “to provide young children of all abilities with excellent early childhood education and care that is affordable for families.”

Strikes for Tykes will be held from 11 am to 2 pm at Elitch Lanes. Registration is $35 for adults and $20 for children. RSVP online or contact Kasi Schuelke at kasi@bmrpc.com or (303) 623-1836 or Evan Lee at evan@bmrpc.com or (303) 623-1840.

Crowdfunding and the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act

On April 5, 2012, President Barack Obama signed the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (JOBS Act) into law. The JOBS Act was intended to increase the ability of small businesses to raise capital.

The legislation makes several changes to existing laws for small businesses. It enlarges the time from two to five years for certain small companies to begin compliance with some regulations, including provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. It allows certain small businesses to have more shareholders before registering with the SEC and becoming a public company. It also creates a new exemption from public filings with the SEC, and gives wider latitude to “emerging growth companies.”

The JOBS Act makes direct mention of “crowdfunding.” Crowdfunding refers to the funding of a company by selling small amounts of equity to many investors. Title III of the JOBS Act amends Section 4 of the Securities Act to allow “crowdfunding” by exempting issuers from the requirements of Section 5 of the Securities Act when they offer and sell up to $1 million in securities, provided that individual investments do not exceed certain thresholds and the issuer satisfies other conditions in the JOBS Act. The SEC has been tasked with developing regulations for crowdfunding; these are being developed and implemented. Until the regulations are implemented, however, the SEC cautions that “any offers or sales of securities purporting to rely on the crowdfunding exemption would be unlawful under the federal securities laws.”

Chapter 26 of The Practitioner’s Guide to Colorado Business Organizations discusses the JOBS Act and other securities issues for small businesses.

CLE Book: The Practitioner’s Guide to Colorado Business Organizations

The 2012 Supplement to The Practitioner’s Guide to Colorado Business Organizations is now available. Click here to purchase the supplement online, or call (303) 860-0608.

Application Process Open for Family Violence Justice Fund Grants from Colorado Judicial Branch

The Colorado Judicial Branch announced today it has opened the application process for Fiscal Year 2013 grants from the Family Violence Justice Fund, which funds programs that provide civil legal services to indigent Coloradans.

Application forms will be available Monday, April 16, 2012 at http://www.courts.state.co.us/Administration/Unit.cfm/Unit/fvjf and will be accepted only via email.

The program was established by the General Assembly in 1999 to help indigent victims of family violence obtain legal services at no cost to them.

Grants will be awarded based on a formula that considers factors including past participation in the program. For Fiscal Year 2013, $625,000 is available for grants.

Applications must be received by the State Court Administrator’s Office by Friday, May 25, 2012, to be considered for a grant. To be eligible, organizations must be non-profit and currently serving the legal needs of indigent victims of family violence.

Successful organizations must be prepared to provide full legal services, including but not limited to assistance with divorce, child custody, child support, and other related civil matters. Additional information regarding the fund and qualifications for organizations receiving grants may be found in section 14-4-107 of the Colorado Revised Statutes.

Applications will be accepted via email only at jessica.zender@judicial.state.co.us. Questions may be directed to Jessica Zender at the email address above or by calling (303) 861-1111.

Schedule Your Colorado Gives Day Donation Today and Benefit Legal Aid and MVL

The Legal Aid Foundation of Colorado and Metro Volunteer Lawyers are both participating in Colorado Gives Day this year, which is a state-wide effort to encourage Coloradans to “Give Where You Live.” The value of all donations made online to the organizations during a 24-hour period on Tuesday, December 6, 2011 will be increased by the FirstBank Incentive Fund. The more each charity receives from your donations, the more money they will receive from FirstBank in addition to your generosity.

Also on Colorado Gives Day, all credit card and processing fees will be covered, so 100% of donations will go directly to support access to justice.

And to be sure you don’t forget on Tuesday, you can go online and schedule your donation today!

An overview of the Legal Aid Foundation, along with their financials and donation information, can be found here.

An overview of Metro Volunteer Lawyers, along with their financials and donation information, can be found here.

Help increase access to justice and donate to these great organizations!

Division of Real Estate Proposes New Rule About Transferring Conservation Easements to Non-Certified Entities

The DORA Division of Real Estate has proposed a new rule for the conservation easement certification program. The purpose of this rule is to prevent a non-certified organization from holding a transferred conservation easement for which a tax credit is claimed. The rule applies to any nonprofit entity and any government entity that holds a conservation easement for which a tax credit is claimed.

A hearing on the proposed rule will be held on Monday, October 24, 2011 at 1560 Broadway, Suite 1250 C, Denver, Colorado 80202, beginning at 10:00 am.

Full text of the proposed rule can be found here. Further information about the rule and hearing can be found here.

Legal Affairs: Attorney Accolades, July 2011

Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons LLP is proud to announce that Charles Goldberg is the recipient of this year’s Isaac Hecht Award by the American Bar Association’s National Client Protection Organization.

Bryan D. Biesterfel has been elected Chair of the Board of Trustees for The Community Foundation, serving Boulder County. Biesterfeld is a business and real-estate lawyer in the Denver based law firm of Robinson Waters & O’Dorisio, P.C. He works with privately held businesses and their owners in mergers and acquisitions, entity formation and operations, sales, and purchases and leasing of real estate, as well as private placements of securities, wills, trusts and business succession planning.

 

 

Jennifer Eiteljorg, a shareholder at the law firm of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck (Brownstein), was recently appointed to the Project Angel Heart Board of Directors. As a board member, Eiteljorg will help guide the strategic growth of the organization, which includes completion of a capital campaign for a new facility. Project Angel Heart’s mission resonates with her because of the impact a life-threatening illness has had on her own friends and family.

Attorney Otto Hilbert, a commercial litigator with the full-service law firm of Robinson Waters & O’Dorisio, has been named the Colorado Judicial Institute’s Board Chair.

 

As Board Chair, Hilbert will continue the Colorado Judicial Institute’s mission to ensure fair and impartial courts and improve accountability in the legal system.

 

Emma R. Keyser, an associate at the law firm of Brownstein, recently was appointed to the Colorado Ballet Board of Trustees. As a board member, Keyser will help fundraising and advocacy efforts to further the organization’s mission of enhancing the community’s cultural life.

 

 

The Docket eFile brings features from your favorite Denver Bar Association publication to you digitally. When you see the logo, you’re reading an article from The Docket. You’ll also still be able to read the full issue online at denbar.org/docket.

Zhonette Brown of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck Appointed to Food Bank of the Rockies Board of Directors

Zhonette M. Brown, a shareholder at the law firm of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, was recently appointed to the Board of Directors at the Food Bank of the Rockies. As a board member, Brown will provide strategic direction to the organization and help with fundraising efforts. Brown, who grew up on a farm, says that she was drawn to the organization as it will allow her to help address hunger in a meaningful way.

Originally founded in 1978 as the Colorado Food Clearing House, the Food Bank of the Rockies (FBR) has grown from distributing food supplies to one agency to more than 1,100 hunger-relief programs throughout Northern Colorado and Wyoming. FBR serves an area where nearly 400,000 people live in poverty and struggle to meet their basic food needs. Last year, FBR distributed 35.7 million pounds of food—76,000 meals each day—to children, seniors, and families in need. The organization operates with a staff of more than sixty and more than 6,000 volunteers.

Thank you, Ms. Brown, for your dedication to the Food Bank of the Rockies and your commitment to our community.

Click here for more information about the Food Bank of the Rockies.