July 6, 2015

Colorado Court of Appeals: CORA Exception for Prosecuting Attorney Does Not Apply to Land Use Violation

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Shook v. Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners on Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Colorado Open Records Act—Investigatory Records Exception.

In August 2012, the Pitkin County Attorney’s Office received a citizen complaint regarding a potential code violation of plaintiff Shook’s property. The complaint was investigated and a violation notice for failure to obtain a necessary construction permit was issued. Shook cured the violation by obtaining a permit.

Several months later, Shook submitted a Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) request to the county attorney (custodian), seeking access to records related to the violation. The custodian provided certain documents but denied access to the original citizen complaint and the investigating officer’s handwritten notes.

Shook then filed this action, seeking a declaratory judgment that the custodian violated CORA by withholding the records, an order directing the custodian to disclose the records, and attorney fees and costs. The district court held that the custodian properly denied access to the records under CORA’s investigatory records exception, CRS § 24-72-204(2)(a)(I).

The investigatory records exception allows a custodian to withhold records if (1) the records relate to investigations conducted by a sheriff, prosecuting attorney, or police department, or are contained in investigatory files compiled for criminal law enforcement purposes; and (2) disclosure would be contrary to the public interest. Here, the record did not support the finding that the records related to an investigation by a prosecuting attorney. Such an attorney refers to one prosecuting a criminal matter, and this was not a criminal prosecution. The order was reversed for failure to meet the first prong.

CRS § 24-72-204(5) requires the court to award costs and reasonable attorney fees to any person who applies for and receives an order requiring a custodian to permit inspection of public records. The case was remanded with directions to order the custodian to allow Shook to inspect the records and, upon Shook’s application, assess and award reasonable court costs and attorney fees in her favor.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Use of Stock Certificate as Exhibit Does Not Qualify as a Filing or Recording

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Battle North, LLC v. Sensible Housing Co. on Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Spurious Documents—CRS §§ 38-35-201(3) and -204.

This case involves a dispute over ownership of real property in Eagle County (Pine Martin parcel). In 1998, Mortgage Investment Corporation (MIC) filed for judicial foreclosure on a deed of trust encumbering the Pine Martin parcel and the Piney Lumber parcel. Defendants included Pine Martin Mining Company (PMMC) and Piney Lumber Company (PLC). PMMC claimed ownership of the Pine Martin parcel and PLC claimed ownership of the Piney Lumber parcel. This essentially converted the foreclosure case to a quiet title action.

In 2000, PMMC and PLC moved for partial summary judgment and MIC filed a cross-motion for partial summary judgment. In 2004, the motions still pending, MIC assigned its interest in the matter to Ginn Battle Lender, LLC (Ginn). PMMC and PLC purported to transfer their interests in the parcels to respondent Sensible Housing Company (Sensible) by quitclaim deeds that Sensible recorded in the Eagle County Clerk and Recorder’s Office. Two of the deeds, one recorded in 2006 and one in 2008, were from PMMC to Sensible and concerned the Pine Martin parcel. These deeds are at issue in this case.

Pursuant to an approved stipulation for how to proceed to resolve the quiet title case, Sensible filed as an exhibit a purported 1915 Stock Certificate certifying that 1,251,000 shares of the capital stock of PMMC had been issued to Bouvier. Sensible’s principal, Tucker, claimed he had obtained those shares from Bouvier’s heir in 1996. On that authority, Tucker created and recorded the 2006 and 2008 quitclaim deeds.

In 2009, the district court granted Ginn’s cross-motion for summary judgment and denied Sensible’s motion. It found the 1915 Stock Certificate and related documents were incredible as a matter of law and therefore Sensible had no interest in either parcel. Sensible appealed, and a division of the Court affirmed summary judgment as to the Piney Lumber parcel but reversed as to the Pine Martin parcel, finding the 1915 Stock Certificate not “so incredible that no reasonable jury could believe it.”

In April 2012, Battle North, LLC (Battle North) filed a petition for an order to show cause pursuant to CRS § 38-35-204 and CRCP 105.1, alleging the 1915 Stock Certificate was a spurious document and requesting an order directing Sensible to show cause why it should not be declared invalid. Battle North amended the petition to request that the two quitclaim deeds also be declared invalid as spurious documents. Following a hearing, the district court made extensive findings, including that the 1915 Stock Certificate was created by Tucker and was a sham, and that both it and the two quitclaim deeds were spurious documents; the court therefore “released” the three documents. The court also awarded Battle Mountain attorney fees and costs pursuant to CRS § 38-35-204(2).

On appeal, Sensible argued that the priority rule required the district court to stay this case pending resolution of the quiet title action. The Court disagreed, holding that CRCP 105.1 allowed Battle North to bring this petition in a separate action and that staying the case would not further the policies behind the priority rule.

Sensible then argued that allowing Battle North to litigate this action contravened the mandate of the Court in an earlier appeal of the quiet title action where it remanded for further proceedings as to the Pine Martin parcel. The Court found nothing in that order precluding Battle North form proceeding as permitted by CRS § 38-35-204 and CRCP 105.1.

Sensible contended that its use of the 1915 Stock Certificate as an exhibit in the quiet title action did not entitle Battle North to relief under CRS § 38-35-204; filing a document as an exhibit in a civil case does not qualify as recording or filing a document within the meaning of the statute. The Court agreed. It held that “recorded or filed” as used in CRS § 38-35-204(1) is limited by its having to affect a person’s real or personal property. The filing of an exhibit in a civil case does not affect a person’s real property. Moreover, there would be no way to “release” such a document (the remedy in the statute). Thus, although the Court did not disturb the finding that the 1915 Stock Certificate was a sham, it was error to rule it was a spurious document under the statute, and that part of the order was reversed.

Sensible argued that the quitclaim deeds were not spurious because a quitclaim deed can convey only the title or interest that the grantor had, and the district court determined that the newly created PMMC had no title or interest to convey. Therefore, Battle North’s property could not have been affected by the recording of the quitclaim deeds. The Court found this argument to be without merit. Sensible argued that unless a document was a valid lien or encumbrance against real property, it cannot be a spurious document, because it cannot affect real property. However, in that case, the document would not be spurious.

Sensible argued that Battle North is not a “person whose real . . . property is affected by” the 1915 Stock Certificate and quitclaim deeds because it does not own the Pine Martin parcel. This argument was based on deficiencies in the treasurer’s deeds by which Battle North claimed title. The Court rejected those arguments on multiple grounds.

The Court also awarded Battle Mountain reasonable appellate attorney fees for defending the judgment as to the quitclaim deeds. The case was remanded to the district court for a determination of that amount.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Fish & Wildlife Service Appropriately Evaluated Environmental Impact of Rocky Flats Transportation Improvement

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in WildEarth Guardians v. United States Fish & Wildlife Service on Friday, April 17, 2015.

WildEarth Guardians, Rocky Mountain Wild, and the Town of Superior (Appellants) challenged the authority of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) to construct a parkway through the former Rocky Flats nuclear facility. Rocky Flats was formerly used to manufacture nuclear weapons, and since 1989 the Department of Energy (DOE) has been tasked with a cleanup effort to remediate the land. Under the Rocky Flats Act, Congress designated authority to the DOE to manage the central area of the Flats, which was contaminated by plutonium and other hazardous materials, and transferred the remainder of the land to the FWS to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The Rocky Flats Act further provided the DOE would transfer the remainder of the land to the FWS as soon as the cleanup was complete, and set aside a large parcel of land at the Flats’ border to be used for transportation improvements (specifically, the parkway).

The DOE transferred the remaining land to the FWS in 2007, and the FWS began considering applications for the transportation project jointly with the DOE. Prior to final approval of the land exchange and construction project, the FWS issued two opinions regarding the potential consequences to the Preble’s Meadow Jumping Mouse, a threatened species with a critical habitat in the corridor. The FWS also issued an environmental assessment pursuant to its duties under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Appellants sued in district court, arguing the FWS violated the Rocky Flats Act, the NEPA, and the Endangered Species Act. The district court rejected all three claims, and Appellants timely appealed.

The Tenth Circuit considered the appeal under the Administrative Procedures Act, evaluating only whether the FWS’s actions were arbitrary and capricious. The Tenth Circuit first addressed Appellants’ argument that the FWS lacked authority to convey the land under the Rocky Flats Act. Applying the Chevron test, the Tenth Circuit found that Congress did not directly discuss whether the FWS could convey the corridor, but by effectuating the intent of Congress and taking the statutory language in context, the Tenth Circuit determined that it was reasonable to assume Congress intended the FWS to convey the corridor for transportation purposes if it had not already been conveyed by DOE. The FWS further asserted it had authority to convey the land under the Refuge Act and Fish and Wildlife Act, and the Tenth Circuit agreed. The Tenth Circuit rejected Appellants’ argument that a catch-all clause in the Rocky Flats Act was meant only to refer to the transportation conveyance, finding that the conveyance was discussed in detail in other parts of the Act, and “Congress knew how to write ‘transportation improvements'” but did not do so in the catch-all clause.

The Tenth Circuit turned next to Appellants’ arguments that the FWS violated NEPA, specifically with respect to contaminated soils, air pollution, and the protected mouse. Appellants argued the FWS erred by issuing an environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact instead of the more formal and detailed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Addressing the soil contaminants, particularly plutonium, the FWS relied on a 2006 EPA certification that the soil conditions were acceptable for unlimited use and unlimited exposure. Although Appellants argued the construction workers would be at greater risk for plutonium exposure, the FWS asserted that a 2011 letter from the EPA sufficiently addressed the risk faced by construction workers. The Tenth Circuit found no impropriety in the FWS’s reliance on the certification and letter and found no NEPA violation regarding the contaminated soils. The Tenth Circuit similarly dismissed Appellants’ contention of a NEPA violation regarding air pollution. Appellants argued the FWS failed to consider 2008 air quality standards when contemplating the transportation improvement. However, the FWS’s action occurred in 2006, and the Tenth Circuit found it unreasonable to expect the FWS to comply with an act that was not yet in existence. Finally, as to the protected mouse, the Tenth Circuit found support for the FWS action because the FWS considered the mouse habitat and found it would not be significantly affected by the transportation improvement. The Tenth Circuit noted the FWS appropriately issued an incidental take statement regarding the mouse.

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s rejection of Appellants’ claims. Appellants had requested leave to file a supplemental appendix, which the Tenth Circuit denied, and it also denied the FWS’s request to file supplemental rebuttal appendix documents as moot.

Tenth Circuit: Bare Legal Title Is Not An Interest that Can Be Avoided in Bankruptcy

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Nguyen: Davis v. Pham on Monday, April 13, 2015.

In September 2007, Hoa Thi Pham purchased property in joint tenancy with her now common law husband, Noel Esplund, so that Pham had a two-thirds interest in the property and Esplund had a one-third interest. Pham then conveyed her interest to the couple’s children, Tung Nguyen and Lisa Dang (now Lisa Stirrat), as joint tenants with rights of survivorship. In May 2008, Nguyen transferred his interest to Esplund and Dang via quit claim deed for no compensation. In May 2009, Nguyen and his wife filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. The bankruptcy trustee, Carl Davis, filed a complaint in Bankruptcy Court, seeking to avoid the transfer from Nguyen under 11 U.S.C. § 548(a)(1)(B), alleging that Nguyen transferred his interest in the property less than two years before filing from bankruptcy, was insolvent at the time of the transfer, and received inadequate consideration for the transfer.

The Bankruptcy Court concluded Nguyen possessed only bare legal title to the property and his mother possessed equitable ownership of his one-third share, finding the transfer created a resulting trust under a Kansas statute that allows a trust to form when a payor provides consideration for a piece of property and then enters into an agreement with another “without fraudulent intent” to hold the property in trust. The Bankruptcy Court based its decision on the circumstances of the agreement, to which Pham and Nguyen testified at the evidentiary hearing, and concluded that bare legal title, when transferred for no consideration, is not an “interest in property” that may be avoided. The trustee appealed to the BAP, which affirmed the Bankruptcy Court’s decision.

The Tenth Circuit first noted that the parties do not dispute the correctness of the Bankruptcy Court’s determination that if Nguyen possessed solely “bare legal title” to the property, § 548(a)(1)(B) could not be used to avoid the transfer. The Tenth Circuit further found no dispute as to the Bankruptcy Court’s factual finding regarding the intent of the parties in the transfer. Therefore, the issue on appeal was whether such transfers are contrary to Kansas law.

Davis argued that a resulting trust is incompatible with a joint tenancy under Kansas law and Tenth Circuit precedent. The Tenth Circuit first found that the precedent on which Davis relied had been impliedly overruled by the Kansas Supreme Court. Analysis of the Kansas case law revealed that Kansas law does allow resulting trusts in joint tenancy situations. Because Davis did not challenge the Bankruptcy Court’s factual finding that Pham and Nguyen intended to create a resulting trust, or its conclusion that bare legal title is not an interest that can be avoided under § 548(a)(1)(B), the Tenth Circuit affirmed the findings of the Bankruptcy Court.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Retroactive Tax Assessment Based on Underreporting of Value Affirmed

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Kinder Morgan CO2 Company, L.P. v. Montezuma County Board of Commissioners on Thursday, June 4, 2015.

Property Tax Assessment—Oil and Gas—Retroactive Application—Transportation Deduction.

In April 2008, Kinder Morgan CO2 Company submitted six operator statements, one for each tax district, detailing its production in Montezuma County for 2007. The operator statements for 2007 showed a decrease in valuation of carbon dioxide from the previous tax year. A Montezuma County assessor audited the statements and determined that Kinder Morgan had underreported the selling price of oil and gas produced, because it had applied the incorrect method of calculating the transportation deduction. The audit resulted in an increased assessment. Kinder Morgan thereafter appealed the order issued by the Board of Assessment Appeals (BAA) upholding the Montezuma County assessor’s collection of additional oil and gas leasehold taxes for the 2007 tax year.

On appeal, Kinder Morgan contended that the BAA erred in concluding that the Assessor’s retroactive increase in value was authorized under the property tax code. HB 90-1018 amended CRS § 39-10-107(1) to permit retroactive assessment of property taxes on the value of oil and gas leaseholds omitted due to underreporting of the selling price of oil and gas or the quantity sold therefrom. Therefore, the BAA’s ruling was affirmed as to the retroactive assessment.

Kinder Morgan also contended that the BAA erred in determining that Kinder Morgan and the Cortez Pipeline Company were related parties for purposes of calculating the transportation deduction. There was sufficient evidence in the record that Kinder Morgan and Cortez Pipeline were partners and a majority of Cortez Pipeline’s income was earned from the owners of the Cortez Pipeline, one of which was Kinder Morgan. Accordingly, the BAA’s ruling regarding the transportation deduction was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Partial Subordination Approach to Lien Priority Best Reflects Colorado Law

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Tomar Development, Inc. v. Friend on Thursday, June 4, 2015.

Lien—Subordination Agreement—Partial Subordination Approach.

The Friend family sold its ranch to Friend Ranch Investors Group (FRIG) to develop it into a resort-style golf course community. In 2010, FRIG conveyed the property to Mulligan, LLC, and at that time, the relevant order of priority was (1) Colorado Capital Bank’s (CCB) senior lien; (2) Tomar Development (Tomar); (3) the Damyanoviches; (4) the Friends; and (5) CCB’s junior lien. Bent Tree, Mulligan, and CCB then entered into a subordination agreement whereby CCB’s senior lien became subordinate to CCB’s junior lien. Neither Tomar, the Damyanoviches, nor the Friends was involved in or an intended beneficiary of the subordination agreement. CCB’s senior lien was never released. Bent Tree then foreclosed on CCB’s senior lien and, in November 2010, Bent Tree bought the property at a public trustee’s foreclosure sale for approximately $11,800. Tomar, the Friends, and the Damyanoviches filed claims, each of which sought declaratory judgments as to the priority of their interests, which were dismissed by the trial court under CRCP 12(b)(5).

On appeal, Tomar, the Friends, and the Damyanoviches argued that the trial court erred in applying the partial subordination approach to the subordination of liens. The partial subordination approach applies when the most senior lienholder (A) agrees to subordinate his interest to the most junior lienholder (C) without consulting the intermediary lienholders (B). Under this approach, when A subordinates to C, C becomes the most senior lienholder, but only to the extent of A’s original lien. Under this partial subordination approach, B is not affected by the agreement between A and C, to which it was not privy. Colorado adopts the partial subordination approach, and it was properly applied in this case. Accordingly, the trial court did not err in dismissing Tomar’s, the Damyanoviches’, and the Friends’ claims seeking a declaratory judgment that each of their interests was senior to all other interests.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Property Owner Can Incorporate HOA Without Consent of Other Owners

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in DeJean v. Grosz on Thursday, June 4, 2015.

Condominium—Declaration—Homeowners’ Association—Preliminary Injunction.

The DeJeans and Grosz each owned one unit in a two-unit condominium in Aspen. Before either the DeJeans or Grosz had purchased their units, Schiff, the original owner, had filed and recorded a declaration (Declaration) stating that the covenant runs with the land and that the condominium project called for the existence of a unit owners’ association (Association) to manage the common areas. In March 2013, Grosz incorporated the Association. When the DeJeans learned that the Association had been incorporated, they demanded that Grosz terminate it. The DeJeans thereafter brought this lawsuit. In issuing a preliminary injunction against Grosz, the trial court found that because no Association existed when the DeJeans purchased their unit, the DeJeans have a reasonable probability of success in contesting how the Association was created.

On appeal, Grosz argued that the trial court erred in granting the preliminary injunction because the DeJeans failed to demonstrate that they had a reasonable probability of success on the merits. Where the condominium declaration contemplates a homeowners’ association, and especially where the covenant runs with the land, a property owner can incorporate a homeowners’ association without further consent from the other unit owners. Therefore, the DeJeans had notice of the Association and consented to membership in it when they purchased their unit, regardless of when the Association was incorporated. Accordingly, the DeJeans did not have a reasonable probability of success on the merits of their claims, and the preliminary injunction was vacated.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Final Bills of 2015 Legislative Session Signed; Three Sent to Secretary of State Without Signature

CapitolbuildingOn Friday, June 5, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed 60 bills into law and allowed three bills to become law without a signature. To date, Governor Hickenlooper has signed 362 bills into law, vetoed three bills, and allowed three to become law without a signature. The bills signed Friday are summarized here.

  • SB 15-011 – Concerning the Pilot Program for Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries Relating to the Use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill continues the Medicaid Spinal Cord Injury Alternative Medicine Pilot Program and expands the program so it can serve additional clients.
  • SB 15-090Concerning the Adoption of Standards Governing Temporary Permits on Motor Vehicles for Effective Readability, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Max Tyler. The bill requires that temporary motor vehicle plates meet the same requirements regarding readability as permanent plates.
  • HB 15-1310 – Concerning the Authority of the Division of Parks and Wildlife to Acquire Real Property for their Garfield County Administrative Office and Public Service Center, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Bob Rankin and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill allows the Division of Parks and Wildlife to purchase a specific property in Garfield County.
  • HB 15-1318 – Concerning the Requirements for Administering a Single Medicaid Waiver for Home- and Community-Based Services for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill requires the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to consolidate two waiver programs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • HB 15-1252 – Concerning an Extension of the Number of Years the Individual Income Tax Return Includes a Voluntary Contribution Designation for the Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund, by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill extends the voluntary check-box contribution for the Colorado Healthy Rivers Fund until 2020.
  • HB 15-1166 – Concerning the Creation of a Tributary Groundwater Monitoring Network in the South Platte River Alluvial Aquifer, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Lori Saine & Jeni James Arndt and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill creates a basin-wide tributary groundwater monitoring network in the South Platte River alluvial aquifer based on recommendations from a CWCB report.
  • HB 15-1283 – Concerning Marijuana Testing, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating a Reference Lab by December 31, 2015, that will House a Library of Testing Methodologies and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Steve Lebsock and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill requires the Department of Public Health and Environment to develop and maintain a marijuana laboratory testing reference library.
  • HB 15-1368 – Concerning the Creation of a Cross-System Response for Behavioral Health Crises Pilot Program to Serve Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill creates a pilot program to support collaborative approaches for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities and a mental health or behavioral disorder.
  • HB 15-1247 – Concerning the Implementation of the Legislative Audit Committee’s Recommendations for Review of Dam Safety, by Rep. Lori Saine and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill increases the fees charged by the State Engineer for dam project design review.
  • HB 15-1248 – Concerning Limited Access by Private Child Placement Agencies to Records Relating to Child Abuse or Neglect for Purposes of Ensuring Safe Placements for Foster Children, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Jonathan Singer and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill permits one representative at each child placement agency to review records of potential foster parents for reports of abuse or neglect.
  • HB 15-1355 – Concerning Access to Personal Records Relating to a Person’s Family History, by Reps. Lori Saine & Jonathan Singer and Sens. Vicki Marble & Linda Newell. The bill allows an adult adoptee to access his or her birth certificate and that of his or her adult sibling in Colorado.
  • HB 15-1357 – Concerning the Establishment of the Ratio of Valuation for Assessment of Residential Real Property, by Reps. Lois Court & Brian DelGrosso and Sens. Tim Neville & Michael Johnston. The bill establishes the residential assessment rate for 2015-2016 and does not change it.
  • SB 15-020 – Concerning Education Regarding the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Assault, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Linda Newell and Rep. Beth McCann. The bill expands the duties of the School Safety Resource Center to include providing education and materials regarding awareness and prevention of child sexual assault.
  • SB 15-109 – Concerning the Mandatory Reporting of Mistreatment Against an Adult with a Disability, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dave Young. The bill expands the at-risk adult reporting requirements to include adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • SB 15-195 – Concerning Appropriating to the Department of Corrections Moneys Generated as Savings from the Awarding of Achievement Earned Time to Inmates, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill limits the amount of earned time savings that may be used toward education and parole programs.
  • SB 15-196 – Concerning Measures to Ensure Industrial Hemp Remains Below a Delta-9 Tetrahydrocannabinol Concentration of No More than Three-Tenths of One Percent on a Dry Weight Basis, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Vicki Marble & Pat Steadman and Reps. Steve Lebsock & Lois Saine. The bill expands the industrial hemp committee and imposes new regulations on industrial hemp.
  • SB 15-220 – Concerning Security for the Colorado General Assembly, by Sens. Morgan Carroll & Bill Cadman and Reps. Crisanta Duran & Brian DelGrosso. The bill requires the Colorado State Patrol to provide protection for the members of the General Assembly.
  • SB 15-256 – Concerning the Operation of the Legislative Committee that Oversees the Colorado Health Benefit Exchange, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. Beth McCann. The bill makes several changes to the Colorado health benefit exchange committee’s duties.
  • SB 15-115 – Concerning the Sunset Review of the Medical Marijuana Programs, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Ellen Roberts. The bill continues the Medical Marijuana Code until 2019 and implements some changes to the program.
  • HB 15-1063 – Concerning Prohibited Communication Concerning Patents, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dan Pabon and Sen. David Balmer. The bill establishes a framework for communications between parties regarding patent rights.
  • HB 15-1178 – Concerning the State Engineer’s Authority to Allow Well Users to Lower the Water Table in an Area that the State Engineer Determines is Experiencing Damaging High Groundwater Levels, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing an Emergency Dewatering Grant Program for the Purpose of Lowering the Water Table in Areas of Gilcrest, Colorado, and Sterling, Colorado and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Lori Saine & Stephen Humphrey and Sens. Vicki Marble & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill establishes the Emergency Dewatering Grant Program for the emergency pumping of wells.
  • HB 15-1102 – Concerning the Expansion of the “Colorado Cottage Foods Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Food Products a Producer Can Sell Under the Act, Requiring an Additional Disclaimer, and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Millie Hamner & Yeulin Willett and Sens. Kerry Donovan & Kevin Grantham. The bill divides the foods that can be produced under the Cottage Foods Act into two tiers.
  • SB 15-012 – Concerning the Treatment of Child Support for Purposes of the Colorado Works Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. John Kefalas and Rep. Brittany Pettersen. The bill allows the Department of Human Services to disregard child support income when determining eligibility for the TANF program.
  • HB 15-1219 – Concerning the Enterprise Zone Investment Tax Credit for Renewable Energy Products, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Beth McCann & Jon Becker and Sens. Mary Hodge & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill allows a taxpayer who places a renewable energy product in an enterprise zone to receive a refund of the tax credit.
  • HB 15-1228 – Concerning the Special Fuel Excise Tax on Liquefied Petroleum Gas, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Diane Mitsch Bush & Jon Becker and Sen. Ray Scott. The bill makes several changes to the administration and collection of the special fuel excise tax program for liquefied petroleum.
  • HB 15-1350 – Concerning Performance Measures for Accrediting an Alternative Education Campus, by Rep. Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill requires the Department of Education to convene stakeholder meetings to review statutes and rules related to performance indicators for the accreditation of alternative education campuses.
  • HB 15-1392 – Concerning Changes to the State’s Payroll System to Allow All State Employees to be Paid Twice a Month, by Reps. Dave Young & Jack Tate and Sens. Linda Newell & Tim Neville. The bill changes the pay schedule for all state employees to twice a month.
  • HB 15-1352 – Concerning Modifications to the Naturopathic Formulary of Medications that a Registered Naturopathic Doctor is Authorized to Use in the Practice of Naturopathic Medicine, by Reps. Joann Ginal & Kathleen Conti and Sens. Larry Crowder & Linda Newell. The bill expands the authority of naturopathic doctors in several ways.
  • HB 15-1353 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Conveyances, and, in Connection Therewith, Extending the Certification of Conveyances and Conveyance Mechanics, Contractors, and Inspectors of Elevators and Escalators Until July 1, 2022, by Rep. Alec Garnett and Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill extends the Elevator and Escalator Certification Act to regulate conveyances.
  • HB 15-1360 – Concerning the Use of Injection Therapy by Acupuncturists Licensed Pursuant to Article 29.5 of Title 12, Colorado Revised Statutes, by Rep. Joann Ginal and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill allows licensed acupuncturists to practice injection therapy.
  • HB 15-1083 – Concerning Patient Financial Contributions for Physical Rehabilitation Services, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill requires the Colorado Commission on Affordable Health Care to conduct a study of the costs of physical rehabilitation services.
  • HB 15-1261 – Concerning the Maximum Reserve for a Cash Fund with Fee Revenue, by Rep. Dave Young and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Pat Steadman. The bill alters the cash fund reserve requirement.
  • HB 15-1273 – Concerning Additional Comprehensive Reporting Requirements for School Discipline Reports, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring a Post-Enactment Review of the Implementation of this Act and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Polly Lawrence and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill adds sexual assaults and marijuana violations to the list of items that must be included in a safe schools report.
  • HB 15-1370 – Concerning Access to Certain Records of a County Department of Human or Social Services Containing Personal Identifying Information by an Auditor Conducting a Financial or Performance Audit of that Department, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sens. Lucia Guzman & Tim Neville. The bill permits an auditor access to all files of a county department of human or social services that are needed to conduct the audit.
  • SB 15-029 – Concerning a Study of Volunteer Firefighter Pension Plans in the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Jessie Ulibarri and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill requires the state auditor to conduct a study of firefighter pension plans in Colorado.
  • SB 15-184 – Concerning Enforcement of Compulsory Education Requirements, by Sen. Chris Holbert and Rep. Rhonda Fields. The bill requires the chief judge in each judicial district to convene a meeting of stakeholders to find ways to address truancy other than detention.
  • SB 15-203 – Concerning Continuation of the Regulation of Debt-Management Service Providers by the Attorney General, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Report by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill continues the Uniform Debt-Management Services Act.
  • SB 15-228 – Concerning a Process for the Periodic Review of Provider Rates Under the “Colorado Medical Assistance Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill establishes a process for the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to review Medicare provider rates.
  • SB 15-261 – Concerning a Modification to the Statute that Specifies the Forms of Public Notice that a Public Utility May Provide Regarding a Change in the Public Utility’s Schedule of Charges to Allow a Request for an Alternative Form of Notice within the Same Formal Application that the Public Utility Files with the Public Utilities Commission When Applying for a Change in the Public Utility’s Schedule of Charges, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Dave Young. The bill allows public utilities to request rate changes during existing proceedings.
  • HB 15-1282 – Concerning the Creation of Crimes Involving Deception about Material Information in Connection with Birth Certificates, by Rep. Lois Saine and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill creates a class 2 misdemeanor for anyone who intentionally omits material information in the preparation of a birth certificate.
  • HB 15-1309 – Concerning the Placement of Interim Therapeutic Restorations by Dental Hygienists, and, in Connection Therewith, Ensuring Medicaid and Children’s Basic Health Plan Reimbursement for Services Provided Through the Use of Telehealth Related to Interim Therapeutic Restoration Procedures and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Joann Ginal and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill allows dental hygienists to perform therapeutic restorations.
  • HB 15-1333 – Concerning the Creation of a Regional Center Depreciation Account in the Capital Construction Fund for Maintenance of the State’s Regional Centers, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill creates the Regional Center Depreciation Account to hold moneys for depreciation and capital construction.
  • HB 15-1337 – Concerning Placement Stability for Children, by Rep. Angela Williams and Sen. Linda Newell. The bill requires a court to consider all statutory factors when placing a child for foster care.
  • HB 15-1340 – Concerning an Extension of the Period During Which the Voluntary Contribution Designation Benefiting the Colorado Multiple Sclerosis Fund will Appear on the State Individual Income Tax Return Form, by Reps. Faith Winter & Perry Buck and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Linda Newell. The bill extends the Colorado Multiple Sclerosis Fund check-off through 2021.
  • HB 15-1345 – Concerning an Exemption from Certain Traffic Requirements for the Riders of a Three-Wheel Low-Speed Motorcycle, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill exempts motorcyclists who ride low-speed three-wheeled motorcycles from requirements of licensure and eye protection.
  • HB 15-1366 – Concerning the Expansion of the Colorado Job Growth Incentive Tax Credit to Allow Credits for Businesses that Enter Into a Qualified Partnership with a State Institution of Higher Education, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Yeulin Willett and Sen. David Balmer. The bill allows the job growth incentive tax credit to be refundable under certain conditions.
  • HB 15-1387 – Concerning the Elimination of the Authorized Transfer of Medical Marijuana to Retail Marijuana at the Time that a Retail Marijuana Establishment License Becomes Effective, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Bob Rankin and Sens. Pat Steadman & Kent Lambert. The bill prohibits a medical marijuana facility with a retail marijuana license from transferring any of its medical marijuana to the retail establishment.
  • SB 15-192 – Concerning the Provision of a Therapeutic Alternative Drug Selection to Patients Residing in Certain Long-Term Care Facilities, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Janak Joshi. The bill allows licensed pharmacists to provide therapeutic alternate drug selections to patients in nursing care facilities and long-term acute care hospitals if certain conditions are met.
  • SB 15-209 – Concerning an Amendment to Specified Statutes Governing the Management of the Financial Affairs of a Unit Owners’ Association Under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act” so as to Exempt Communities in Which a Majority of Units Designated for Residential Use are Time Share Units, by Sen. David Balmer and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill exempts certain timeshare communities from the definitions of “common interest community” and “homeowners’ association.”
  • SB 15-210Concerning Creation of the Title Insurance Commission, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill creates the Title Insurance Commission to serve as an advisory body to the Commissioner of Insurance.
  • SB 15-229 – Concerning the Creation of an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis License Plate for Motor Vehicles, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Reps. Janak Joshi & Diane Mitsch Bush. The bill creates an ALS license plate, available when the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the ALS Association receives 3,000 signatures of individuals committed to purchase the plate.
  • SB 15-262 – Concerning Updates to the Statutes Regulating Blanket Sickness and Accident Insurance, by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill expands and clarifies the groups that may receive blanket accident and sickness insurance.
  • SB 15-267 – Concerning the Financing of Public Schools, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill increases per-pupil funding for public schools to reflect inflation.
  • SB 15-270 – Concerning the Creation of the Office of the State Architect, and, in Connection Therewith, Adding Statewide Planning Responsibilities and Making and Reducing an Appropriation, by Sen. Kent Lambert and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill creates the Office of the State Architect in law.
  • SB 15-271 – Concerning the Continuation of the Entities Charged with Representing the Interests of Certain Utility Consumers in Matters Heard by the Public Utilities Commission, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Jon Becker. The bill continues the Office of the Consumer Counsel and implements recommendations from the sunset review.
  • SB 15-278 – Concerning an Amendment to the Annual General Appropriation Act for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year to Allow Unspent Moneys Appropriated for the Colorado State Capitol Dome Restoration Project to be Used for the Next Planned Phase of the Colorado State Capitol Restoration, by Sens. Kent Lambert & Pat Steadman and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill allows the Department of Personnel and Administration to use moneys from the capitol restoration project on other projects.
  • SB 15-281 – Concerning Parent Engagement in Institute Charter Schools, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill requires charter schools, rather than the Charter School Institute, to hold meetings regarding school priority implementation.
  • SB 15-283 – Concerning Debt Collection Proceedings, and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Scope and Value of Assets that may be Exempted, Clarifying Definitions of “Earnings”, and Specifying the Procedure for Service of Notice of Exemption and Pending Levy in Certain Garnishment Proceedings, by Sen. Laura Woods and Rep. Pete Lee. The bill modifies exemptions and procedures in certain debt collection actions.
  • SB 15-202 – Concerning the Regulation of Water Conditioning Appliances Pursuant to the Plumbing Code, by Sen. David Balmer and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill creates three new categories of registered water conditioners.
  • HB 15-1301 – Concerning the Creation of a Credit for Tobacco Products that a Distributor Ships or Transports to an Out-of-State Consumer, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating the “Cigar On-Line Sales Equalization Act” and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Angela Williams and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Owen Hill. The bill creates a credit against tobacco excise tax equal to Colorado excise taxes paid on tobacco products other than cigarettes sold by a distributor to an out-of-state consumer.

In addition to the bills signed Friday, the governor allowed three bills to become law without a signature. These bills are also summarized here.

  • HB 15-1316 – Concerning a Simplification of the Process by which the Public Utilities Commission may Issue a Certificate to Provide Taxicab Service in Certain Metropolitan Counties, by Reps. Steve Lebsock & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Owen Hill & Jessie Ulibarri. The bill changes the prerequisites for an applicant seeking authorization to provide taxicab service within certain counties.
  • SB 15-067 – Concerning an Increase in the Class of Offense for Certain Acts of Assault Against Persons Engaged in Performing their Duties as Emergency Responders, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Janak Joshi. The bill raises the classification for assault of a first responder to assault in the second degree.
  • SB 15-290 – Concerning Creation of the Colorado Student Leaders Institute, And, In Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Nancy Todd and Rep. Jim Wilson. The bill creates the Colorado Student Leaders Institute, a competitive summer residential education program for high school students.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Traffic Camera Bills Vetoed; PERA Reduction, School Safety, and More Bills Signed

On Wednesday, June 3, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed six bills into law and vetoed two bills. To date, he has signed 296 bills into law and vetoed two bills. The bills on which he took legislative action Wednesday are summarized here.

Signed

  • HB 15-1391 – Concerning an Adjustment to the Total Employer Contribution Rate of the Denver Public Schools Division of the Public Employees’ Retirement Association in Connection with the Equalization Status of the Association’s Denver Public Schools Division with the Association’s School Division as Required by the Merger of the Denver Public Schools Retirement System with the Association, by Reps. Lois Court & Jim Wilson and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill reduces the employer PERA contribution rate, effective January 1, 2015, and allows adjustment of the employer contribution rate every five years.
  • SB 15-213Concerning the Limited Waiver of Governmental Immunity for Claims Involving Public Schools for Injuries Resulting from Incidents of School Violence, by Sens. Bill Cadman & Mark Scheffel and Reps. Dickey Lee Hullinghorst & Crisanta Duran. The bill allows schools and school districts to be held liable if they fail to exercise reasonable care in protecting students and staff from reasonably foreseeable acts of violence.
  • SB 15-214 – Concerning Creating a Legislative Committee on Safety in Schools, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Mark Scheffel & Bill Cadman and Reps. Crisanta Duran & Dickey Lee Hullinghorst. The bill establishes the School Safety and Youth Mental Health Committee to study issues related to school safety and prevention of threats to safety.
  • SB 15-221 – Concerning Public Transit Officers, by Sen. John Cooke and Reps. Jessie Danielson & Kevin Priola. The bill clarifies that a public transit officer who is classified as a peace officer through his or her job is a peace officer at all times, even when off-duty.
  • HB 15-1359 – Concerning the Creation of the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Savings Program for Individuals with Disabilities, by Reps. Jessie Danielson & Lois Landgraf and Sens. John Kefalas & Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill allows the Department of Higher Education to create the ABLE Savings Program for people with disabilities so they may create accounts exempt from federal taxable income.
  • SB 15-288Concerning the Compensation Paid to Certain Public Officials, by Sens. Randy Baumgardner & Mary Hodge and Reps. Millie Hamner & Bob Rankin. The bill aligns the salaries of legislative branch officials with the salaries of judicial branch officials.

Vetoed

  • SB 15-276 – Concerning the Elimination of the Use of Automated Vehicle Identification Systems for Traffic Law Enforcement, by Sens. David Balmer & Morgan Carroll and Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & Stephen Humphrey. The bill would have prohibited the issuance of citations from traffic cameras with specific exceptions for toll roads and toll highways.
  • HB 15-1098 – Concerning the Elimination of the Use of Automated Surveillance Camera Vehicle Identification Systems for Traffic Law Enforcement, by Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & Steve Lebsock and Sen. Tim Neville. The bill would have required local governments to obtain voter approval before utilizing red light cameras, and would have required existing programs to receive voter approval in 2017 in order to continue.

In addition to the bills signed Wednesday, Governor Hickenlooper signed six bills into law on Thursday, bringing the total number of signed bills to 302. The bills signed Thursday are summarized below.

  • HB 15-1367 – Concerning Retail Marijuana Taxes, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill refers a ballot issue to voters regarding whether the state may retain and spend revenue created from retail marijuana excise taxes.
  • HB 15-1249 – Concerning Amendments to the Fees Associated with Water Pollution Control, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing Appropriations, by Rep. KC Becker and Sen. Mary Hodge. The bill recodifies fees for clean water and drinking water programs, and adds fees for pesticide application activities and CDPHE certifications.
  • HB 15-1341 – Concerning Increasing the Penalty from a Class 6 Felony to a Class 5 Felony for Sexual Exploitation of a Child by Possession of Sexually Exploitative Material, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Kathleen Conti & Rhonda Fields and Sens. John Cooke & Michael Johnston. The bill increases the penalty for possession of certain sexually exploitative material and modifies terms concerning electronic media.
  • HB 15-1033 – Concerning Long-Term Strategies to Address Colorado’s Aging Population, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating a Strategic Action Planning Group to Develop a Comprehensive, Long-Term Action Plan for Colorado’s Aging Population and Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Dianne Primavera and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill creates a strategic planning group to study issues facing Coloradoans age 50 and older, and outlines specific study areas.
  • HB 15-1335 – Concerning Access to Personal Records Relating to a Person’s Family History, by Reps. Lori Saine & Jonathan Singer and Sens. Vicki Marble & Linda Newell. The bill allows an adult adoptee to obtain access to a non-certified copy of an original birth certificate and amended birth certificates of adult siblings or half-siblings.
  • SB 15-206 – Concerning Phased Conservation Easement Donations for Conservation Easements Donated On or After January 1, 2015, and, in Connection Therewith, Lowering Transaction Costs for Agricultural Producers, Facilitating Endangered Species Mitigation, and Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Ellen Roberts & Mary Hodge and Reps. Alec Garnett & Jon Keyser. The bill increases the credit awarded for the first $100,000 of a conservation easement tax credit and also increases the maximum credit for a single donor.

Vetoed

  • HB 15-1390 – Concerning an Increase in the Allowable Finance Charge for Certain Consumer Credit Transactions, by Reps. Jovan Melton & Jack Tate and Sens. Chris Holbert & Cheri Jahn. The bill would have increased the unpaid balance limit for current tiered maximum finance charges allowed on certain supervised loans and consumer credit sales.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding Endangered Species Preservation, Career Training, and More Signed

On Friday, May 22, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law, and on Tuesday, May 26, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed four bills into law. To date, he has signed 252 bills into law this legislative session. The bills signed Friday and Tuesday are summarized here.

Friday, May 22, 2015

  • HB 15-1321 – Concerning Measures to Support Rural School Districts, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & Jim Wilson and Sens. Kevin Grantham & Kerry Donovan. The bill provides administrative flexibility for funding for small rural school districts.
  • HB 15-1277 – Concerning Measures to Effectuate the Conservation of Native Species in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Appropriations from the Species Conservation Trust Fund for Purposes Recommended by the Department of Natural Resources, by Rep. Ed Vigil and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill transfers funds for the purpose of conserving native species that are threatened or endangered.
  • SB 15-199 – Concerning the Continuation of the Funding for the Habitat Partnership Program in the Division of Parks and Wildlife, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill continues a program that transfers moneys from big game licenses to the Habitat Partnership Cash Fund.
  • SB 15-226 – Concerning the Education Requirements Necessary to Qualify for a License to Take Wildlife, by Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg and Rep. Ed Vigil. The bill allows the Parks and Wildlife Commission to establish alternatives to a mandatory hunter education course.
  • HB 15-1315 – Concerning Support for County Veterans Service Officers, by Rep. Su Ryden and Sen. Larry Crowder. The bill eliminates a requirement that counties match DMVA funding for county veterans service officers.
  • HB 15-1307 – Concerning a Modification in the Definition of the Term “Qualified Commercial Structure” as the Term is Used in the “Colorado Job Creation and Main Street Revitalization Act”, by Rep. Daneya Esgar and Sen. Pat Steadman. The bill changes the definition of a qualified commercial structure for purposes of the historic preservation tax credit.
  • HB 15-1275 – Concerning Measures to Support Enrollment in Career and Technical Education Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Faith Winter and Sens. Rollie Heath & Vicki Marble. The bill clarifies that career and technical course work related to apprenticeship and internship programs may be used for concurrent enrollment.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

  • HB 15-1170 – Concerning Measures to Raise the Level of Postsecondary and Workforce Readiness that Colorado Students Demonstrate upon Graduation from High School, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Jim Wilson and Sens. Owen Hill & Rollie Heath. The bill adds a requirement of consideration of college enrollment to statistical performance indicator data.
  • HB 15-1180 – Concerning the Creation of a State Sales and Use Tax Refund for Tangible Personal Property that is Used in Colorado for Research and Development by a Qualified Medical Technology or Clean Technology Taxpayer, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Jim Wilson and Sens. Rollie Heath & Chris Holbert. The bill creates a sales and use tax refund for equipment used in clean technology and medical device firms with 35 or fewer employees.
  • HB 15-1230 – Concerning the Creation of the Innovative Industries Workforce Development Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Pete Lee & Mike Foote and Sens. Rollie Heath & John Cooke. The bill creates the Innovative Industries Workforce Development Program to reimburse employers with high-level internships and apprenticeships in innovative industries.
  • HB 15-1276 – Concerning the Creation of a Matching Grant Program to Facilitate Recruitment for Skilled Worker Training Programs, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Dan Pabon & Angela Williams and Sens. John Cooke & Rollie Heath. The bill creates the Skilled Worker Outreach, Recruitment, and Key Training Grant Program to offer grants for training skills that are needed in the workplace and to provide a certificate upon completion.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Regarding Community Association Manager Licensure, Peace Officer Transparency, and More Signed

On Wednesday, May 20, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed 14 bills into law. To date, he has signed 241 bills into law this legislative session. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1323 – Concerning Assessments in Public Schools, and, in Connection Therewith, Codifying the Consensus Recommendations of the Standards and Assessments Task Force Created in House Bill 14-1202, and Reducing an Appropriation, by Reps. John Buckner & Jim Wilson and Sens. Chris Holbert & Andy Kerr. The bill modifies the system of statewide assessments in English language arts.
  • SB 15-056 – Concerning Reducing the Frequency of Administering the Statewide Assessment in Social Studies and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Andy Kerr and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill eliminates the requirement that each public school administer an assessment in social studies and instead allows school districts to administer the test in a representative sampling of schools.
  • HB 15-1317 – Concerning Pay for Success Contracts, by Reps. Alec Garnett & Bob Rankin and Sens. Michael Johnston & Beth Martinez Humenik. The bill creates “pay for success” contracts, into which the Office of State Planning and Budgeting can enter to increase economic opportunity and improve living conditions.
  • HB 15-1129 – Concerning Disaster Prediction and Decision Support Systems by the Department of Public Safety, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill requires the Division of Fire Prevention and Control to develop systems to predict disasters, specifically wildfires.
  • HB 15-1344 – Concerning the Financing of State Capital Construction Projects that are Included in the National Western Center or Capitol Complex Master Plans, and, in Connection Therewith, Authorizing the State to Enter Into Lease-Purchase Agreements to Finance Facilities for Colorado State University that are Included in the National Western Master Plan, Creating the National Western Center Trust Fund, and Creating a Capitol Complex Master Plan Implementation Fund as a Funding Source for Projects that are Included in the Capitol Complex Master Plan, by Reps. Crisanta Duran & Jon Becker and Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & Pat Steadman. The bill authorizes the state treasurer to enter into lease-purchase agreements with CSU to construct facilities at the National Western Complex and CSU’s main campus.
  • HB 15-1285 – Concerning Use of Body-Worn Cameras by Law Enforcement Officers and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing a Grant Program and a Study Group to Recommend Policies on the Use of Body-Worn Cameras and Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Daniel Kagan & Angela Williams and Sens. John Cooke & Jessie Ulibarri. The bill creates the body-worn camera fund to purchase body-worn cameras and train officers in their use, as well as study best practices.
  • HB 15-1287 – Concerning Measures to Improve Peace Officer Training, by Rep. Angela Williams and Sen. John Cooke. The bill expands the scope of the Peace Officers Standards and Training Board in the Department of Law.
  • HB 15-1290 – Concerning Prohibiting a Peace Officer from Interfering with a Person Lawfully Recording a Peace Officer-Involved Incident, by Reps. Joseph Salazar & Daneya Esgar and Sens. Lucia Guzman & David Balmer. The bill specifies that people have the lawful right to record officer-involved incidents.
  • HB 15-1303 – Concerning Eliminating the Application of Certain Sentencing Provisions to Certain Persons who are Convicted of Assault in the Second Degree, by Rep. Jovan Melton and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill removes mandatory crime of violence sentencing for assault against first responders.
  • SB 15-217 – Concerning Data Collection Related to Peace Officer-Involved Shootings of a Person, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Sens. Ellen Roberts & John Cooke and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill creates a process for public reporting of specified data concerning officer-involved shootings.
  • SB 15-218 – Concerning Requiring a Law Enforcement Agency to Disclose Whether a Peace Officer has Made a Knowing Misrepresentation in Certain Settings, by Sens. Ellen Roberts & John Cooke and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill requires a law enforcement agency to report any knowing instance of misrepresentation by a peace officer to the district attorney.
  • SB 15-219 – Concerning Measures to Provide Additional Transparency to Peace Officer-Involved Shootings, by Sens. John Cooke & Ellen Roberts and Rep. Joseph Salazar. The bill requires local law enforcement agencies to make public its protocols regarding contacting other agencies following officer-involved shootings.
  • HB 15-1262 – Concerning Separate Legal Entities Established by a Contract Between Two or More Political Subdivisions of the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying the Legal Status and Scope of Powers of Such an Entity, by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. David Balmer. The bill specifies the legal status and powers of an entity formed by two or more governments to provide public improvements.
  • HB 15-1343 – Concerning a Streamlined Process to Simplify the Licensure of Persons who Manage the Affairs of Common Interest Communities Under the “Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act”, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation, by Reps. Angela Williams & Dan Thurlow and Sens. Nancy Todd & David Balmer. The bill makes several changes to the community association manager licensure program.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Zoning and Land Use Control (3)

Editor’s note: This is Part 22 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

By Frederick B. Skillernfrederick-b-skillern

Board of County Commissioners of Teller County v. City of Woodland Park
Colorado Supreme Court, May 20, 2014
2014 CO 35

Municipal Annexation Act of 1965; timely motion for reconsideration with the municipality as condition to judicial review; C.R.S. § 31-12-116.

The Supreme Court, in a direct appeal by Woodland Park under C.A.R. 21, holds that the district court lacked jurisdiction to review Teller County’s petition for judicial review of an annexation by the City of Woodland Park under C.R.S. § 31-12-116. Subsection (2)(a)(II) of the statue requires a party (such as a county in which the property is located) to file a motion for reconsideration with the governing body of the annexing municipality within ten days of the effective date of an annexation ordinance as a precondition for obtaining judicial review of a municipal annexation. The effective date of the ordinance can, and is here, different than the effective date of the annexation. The petition for reconsideration with the City should have been filed by September 16, 2013, but was not filed until September 20, 2013.

 

Town of Dillon v. Yacht Club Condominiums Home Owners Association
Colorado Supreme Court, May 27, 2014
2014 CO 37

Homeowners association; town parking ordinance; “tandem” parking in town right-of-way; police power; due process.

This is a declaratory judgment action brought by a condominium association near the Dillon Marina in Summit County. The small complex was built in the 1960’s, not long after the creation of the Dillon reservoir, and occupies the corner of an intersection of two residential streets (Tenderfoot and Gold). The reservoir lies to the rear. The condominium buildings consist of approximately 64 “available units,” but only 44 parking spaces. The discrepancy is apparently due to the creation of additional “lockoff” units through subdivision of original units over the years. Over the decades, parking became a problem, for neighbors, bicyclists, and the town. The project provides parking for its owners in paved spaces in front of the building, which is parallel to the adjacent streets. In recent years the occupants have adopted the practice of parking “two cars deep,” front to rear, at right angles to the building along both city streets. This created some stress, as cars parked in front of the building might be forced to back out through a “tunnel” of two cars on each side. Moreover, the second row of cars frequently (neighbors might say substantially) encroached on the town “right-of-way,” which is Town property.

The Town sought by ordinance to prohibit the stacked parking procedure, citing the danger and inconvenience to town residents and interference with the town’s new recreational path — a popular bicycle path connecting Dillon with Frisco and Keystone.

Noting that “only one” accident had been reported in the past 40 years, the district court ruled that the parking ordinance was unreasonable, and a violation of procedural due process. Along with this came an award for attorney fees against the Town under 42 U.S.C. § 1985. The court of appeals affirmed, in an unpublished decision, reasoning that the ordinances were not reasonably related to a legitimate governmental interest because they caused the condo owners significant economic harm and there were alternatives available which would have furthered the Town’s interests. The supreme court accepted the case for review, which is interesting for an unpublished, 3-0 decision. The court reverses the lower courts.

The Supreme Court, in a 7-0 decision by Justice Marquez, holds that the Town did not abuse its police power in enacting the two parking ordinances at issue here.

Can a municipality constitutionally exercise its police power to undertake a road improvement project that eliminates parking on the municipality’s street near a condominium? An ordinance comports with due process where it bears a reasonable relationship to a legitimate government interest. The two ordinances here were within the Town’s police power to regulate matters of public health, safety, and welfare, and were a reasonable exercise of that power because the measures are reasonably related to the Town’s objectives of improving traffic safety, improving water drainage, and remedying a missing portion of a recreational bike path.

Importantly, the Court holds that the inquiry turns on the reasonableness of the relationship between the ordinance and the government objectives to be achieved, and not on the burden on the complaining party or the availability of less burdensome alternatives. Accordingly, the Court reversed the court of appeals’ judgment, and remands the case to the court of appeals for further proceedings – the lower court had affirmed the district court’s ruling solely on the police power issue, without considering the district court’s alternative findings that the ordinances were unconstitutionally retrospective.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.