June 23, 2018

Bills Requiring Elected Officials to Swear by “Everliving God,” Providing Representation to Indigent Defendants in Municipal Courts, and More Signed

On Friday, June 1, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 10 bills into law and vetoed three bills. On Monday, June 4, the governor signed seven bills and vetoed two. To date, he has signed 367 bills into law, sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature, and vetoed five bills.

Some of the bills signed include a bill requiring elected officials who choose to swear their oath of office, rather than affirm, to do so by the “everliving God” while raising their hand, a bill allowing transportation services for foster children in order to improve high school graduation rates, a bill allowing independent representation for indigent defendants in municipal courts, and more. Some of the bills vetoed include a bill allowing out-of-state electors to participate in Colorado elections, a bill restricting parties able to receive autopsy reports for minors, and a bill allowing a credit for tobacco products shipped out of state. The bills signed and vetoed Friday are summarized here.

Signed

  • SB 18-003 – “Concerning the Colorado Energy Office,” by Sen. Ray Scott and Reps. Chris Hansen & Jon Becker. The bill repeals several programs providing energy grants for schools, and specifies several preferred energy methods.
  • SB 18-200 – “Concerning Modifications to the Public Employees’ Retirement Association Hybrid Defined Benefit Plan Necessary to Eliminate with a High Probability the Unfunded Liability of the Plan Within the Next Thirty Years,” by Sens. Jack Tate & Kevin Priola and Reps. KC Becker & Dan Pabon. The bill makes changes to the hybrid defined benefit plan administered by PERA with the goal of eliminating, with a high probability, the unfunded actuarial accrued liability of each of PERA’s divisions and thereby reach a 100% funded ratio for each division within the next 30 years.
  • SB 18-203 – “Concerning the Provision of Independent Counsel to Indigent Defendants in Municipal Courts, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Vicki Marble and Rep. Susan Lontine. The bill requires each municipality, on and after January 1, 2020, to provide independent indigent defense for each indigent defendant facing a possible jail sentence for a violation of a municipal ordinance. Independent indigent defense requires, at minimum, that a nonpartisan entity independent of the municipal court and municipal officials oversee the provision of indigent defense counsel.
  • SB 18-219 – “Concerning the Rates a Motor Vehicle Dealer Charges a Motor Vehicle Manufacturer for Work Performed by the Dealer in Accordance with a Warranty Obligation,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill requires motor vehicle manufacturers to fulfill warranty obligations. A manufacturer must compensate each of its motor vehicle dealers in accordance with a set of standards designed to reflect the current market rate for labor and the profit margin on parts the dealer can expect to obtain. Dealers must submit certain repair orders to the manufacturer as required by the bill to establish compensation rates.
  • SB 18-230 – “Concerning Modification of the Laws Governing the Establishment of Drilling Units for Oil and Gas Wells, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying that a Drilling Unit may Include more than One Well, Providing Limited Immunity to Nonconsenting Owners Subject to Pooling Orders, Adjusting Cost Recovery from Nonconsenting Owners, and Modifying the Conditions upon which a Pooling Order may be Entered,” by Sen. Vicki Marble and Reps. Lori Saine & Matt Gray. Current law authorizes ‘forced’ or ‘statutory’ pooling, a process by which any interested person–typically an oil and gas operator–may apply to the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission for an order to pool oil and gas resources located within a particularly identified drilling unit. The bill clarifies that an order entered by the commission establishing a drilling unit may authorize more than one well.
  • SB 18-242 – “Concerning the Swearing of a Public Official Oath of Office,” by Sens. Vicki Marble and Reps. Timothy Leonard & Stephen Humphrey. The bill requires a person swearing an oath of office for a public office or position to do so by swearing by the everliving God. The bill also requires the person swearing the oath of office to do so with an uplifted hand.
  • SB 18-243 – “Concerning the Retail Sale of Alcohol Beverages, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Chris Holbert & Lucia Guzman and Reps. Daneya Esgar & Hugh McKean. Under current law, effective January 1, 2019, the limitation on the maximum alcohol content of fermented malt beverages, also referred to as ‘3.2% beer’, is eliminated, thereby allowing grocery stores, convenience stores, and any other person currently licensed or licensed in the future to sell fermented malt beverages for consumption on or off the licensed premises to sell fermented malt beverages containing more than 3.2% alcohol by weight or 4% alcohol by volume, referred to as ‘malt liquor’. The bill modifies laws governing the retail sale of fermented malt beverages, which will be synonymous with malt liquor as of January 1, 2019.
  • SB 18-276 – “Concerning an Increase in the General Fund Reserve,” by Sens. Kevin Lundberg & Millie Hamner and Reps. Kent Lambert & Dave Young. For the fiscal year 2018-19, and each fiscal year thereafter, the bill increases the statutorily required general fund reserve from 6.5% to 7.25% of the amount appropriated for expenditure from the general fund.
  • HB 18-1006 – “Concerning Modifications to the Newborn Screening Program Administered by the Department of Public Health and Environment, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Millie Hamner & Larry Liston and Sens. Bob Gardner & Dominick Moreno. The bill updates the current newborn screening program to require more timely newborn hearing screenings. The department of public health and environment (department) is authorized to assess a fee for newborn screening and necessary follow-up services. The bill creates the newborn hearing screening cash fund for the purpose of covering the costs of the program.
  • HB 18-1185 – “Concerning Changes to the State Income Tax Apportionment Statute Based on the Most Recent Multistate Tax Commission’s Uniform Model of the Uniform Division of Income for Tax Purposes Act,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Cole Wist and Sens. Tim Neville & Dominick Moreno. For income tax years commencing on and after January 1, 2019, the bill generally replaces the method for sourcing of sales for purposes of apportioning the income of a taxpayer that has income from the sale of services or from the sale, lease, license, or rental of intangible property in both Colorado and other states from the cost-of-performance test in the case of services and the commercial domicile test in the case of intangible property to a market-based sourcing system.
  • HB 18-1187 – “Concerning the Lawful Use of a Prescription Drug that Contains Cannabidiol that is Approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration,” by Reps. Janet Buckner & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Dominick Moreno & John Cooke. The bill amends the definition of ‘marijuana’ to exclude prescription drug products approved by the federal food and drug administration and dispensed by a pharmacy or prescription drug outlet registered by the state of Colorado. The bill also specifies that the change does not restrict or otherwise affect regulation of or access to marijuana that is legal under Colorado’s statutory or constitutional scheme or industrial hemp and its derivatives.
  • HB 18-1244 – “Concerning the Creation of a Submarine Service License Plate to Honor the Service of Submarine Veterans, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Jessie Danielson and Sens. Nancy Todd & Bob Gardner. The bill creates the submarine service license plate. In addition to the standard motor vehicle fees, the plate requires 2 one-time fees of $25. One fee is credited to the highway users tax fund and the other to a fund that provides licensing services.
  • HB 18-1270 – “Concerning Energy Storage, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring the Public Utilities Commission to Establish Mechanisms for Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to Procure Energy Storage Systems if Certain Criteria are Satisfied,” by Reps. Chris Hansen & Jon Becker and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill directs the public utilities commission to adopt rules establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity.
  • HB 18-1271 – “Concerning the Authorization of Economic Development Rates to be Charged by Electric Utilities to Qualifying Nonresidential Customers,” by Reps. Matt Gray & Yeulin Willett and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill allows the public utilities commission to approve, and electric utilities to charge, economic development rates, which are lower rates for commercial and industrial users who locate or expand their operations in Colorado so as to increase the demand by at least 3 megawatts.
  • HB 18-1286 – “Concerning Allowing School Personnel to Give Medical Marijuana to a Student with a Medical Marijuana Registry Card while at School,” by Rep. Dylan Roberts and Sens. Irene Aguilar & Vicki Marble. Under current law, a primary caregiver may possess and administer medical marijuana in a nonsmokeable form to a student while the student is at school. The bill allows a school nurse or the school nurse’s designee, who may or may not be an employee of the school, or school personnel designated by a parent to also possess and administer medical marijuana to a student at school. The bill provides a school nurse or the school nurse’s designee or the school personnel designated by a parent protection from criminal prosecution if he or she possesses and administers medical marijuana to a student at school.
  • HB 18-1306 – “Concerning Ensuring Educational Stability for Students in Out-of-Home Placement, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Sens. Don Coram & Dominick Moreno. The bill aligns state law with federal ‘Every Student Succeeds Act’ (ESSA) provisions relating to students in foster care, referred to in state statutes as ‘students in out-of-home placement’. ESSA permits students in out-of-home placement at any time during the school year to remain in their school of origin, as defined in the bill, rather than move to a different school upon placement outside of the home or changes in placement, unless the county department of human or social services determines that it is not in the child’s best interest to remain in his or her school of origin.
  • HB 18-1430 – “Concerning the Requirement that a State Agency Prepare a Long-Range Financial Plan,” by Reps. Kevin Van Winkle & Dave Young and Sen. Kevin Lundberg. The bill requires each state agency to develop a long-range financial plan on or before November 1, 2019, and to update the plan each of the next 4 years thereafter. The department of state, the department of treasury, the department of law, and the judicial branch shall each publish the required components of the plan for their respective state agencies. The office of state planning and budgeting shall publish the required components of the plan in its annual budget instructions for all other state agencies.

Vetoed

  • SB 18-179 – “Concerning Adjustments to Total Gross Purchases for Purposes of Calculating the Excise Tax on Tobacco Products, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Owen Hill & Angela Williams and Reps. Edie Hooten & Dan Pabon. Currently and until September 1, 2018, a distributor can claim a credit for taxes paid on tobacco products that are shipped or transported by the distributor to a consumer outside of the state. The bill would have made the credit permanent and requires the distributor to maintain certain records related to the out-of-state sales to consumers. “While the bill’s economic benefits appear minimal, the negative health effects of cheaper tobacco are both significant and compelling,” said Governor John Hickenlooper in the veto letter. “These concerns remain from when we vetoed SB 17-139.”
  • SB 18-223 – “Concerning the Circumstances Under Which an Autopsy Report Prepared in Connection with the Death of a Minor may be Released to Certain Parties,” by Sen. Bob Gardner and Reps. Matt Gray & Terri Carver. The bill specified that an autopsy report prepared in connection with the death of a minor is confidential and may be disclosed by the county coroner to any other person or entity only in accordance with certain exceptions. “Transparency can lead to enhanced government protections, greater public and private resources, and heightened public understanding and demand for change,” wrote Governor John Hickenlooper in the veto letter. He went on to say, “An informed public has societal benefits for all at-risk children, present and future.”
  • HB 18-1181 – “Concerning Measures to Expand the Ability of Nonresident Electors to Participate in the Governance of Special Districts, and, in Connection Therewith, Allowing Nonresident Electors Who Own Taxable Property Within the Special District to Vote in Special District Elections And Allowing Such Electors to Serve on Special District Boards in a Nonvoting Capacity,” by Rep. Larry Liston and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill would have expanded the definition of ‘eligible elector’, as used in reference of persons voting in special district elections, to include a natural person who owns, or whose spouse or civil union partner owns, taxable real or personal property situated within the boundaries of the special district or the area to be included in the special district and who has satisfied all other requirements in the bill for registering to vote in an election of a special district but who is not a resident of the state. “Allowing non-Coloradans to vote in Colorado elections to select our elected representatives is poor public policy,” said Governor John Hickenlooper in the veto letter. “Out-of-state landowners enjoy Colorado’s great views, activities, and economy. While we are grateful to our out-of-state neighbors and their love of Colorado, we are unpersuaded that the State should allow those who spend days or weeks in Colorado to make decisions impacting those who make it their home each and every day.”
  • HB 18-1258 – “Concerning Authorization for an Endorsement to an Existing Marijuana License to Allow for a Marijuana Accessory Consumption Establishment for the Purposes of Consumer Education, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Jovan Melton & Jonathan Singer and Sens. Tim Neville & Stephen Fenberg. The bill would have  authorized each licensed medical marijuana center or retail marijuana store to establish one retail marijuana accessory consumption establishment that may sell marijuana, marijuana concentrate, and marijuana-infused products for consumption, other than smoking, at the establishment. “Since Colorado approved Amendment 64 in 2012, this Administration implemented a robust regulatory system to carry out the intent of this voter-initiated measure,” said Governor John Hickenlooper in the veto letter. “Amendment 64 is clear: marijuana consumption may not be conducted ‘openly’ or ‘publicly’ on ‘in a manner that endangers others’ We find that HB 18-1258 directly conflicts with this constitutional requirement.”
  • HB 18-1427 – “Concerning a Prohibition on Conflicts of Interest of Members of the Sex Offender Management Board,” by Reps. Leslie Herod & Cole Wist and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill would have prohibited members of the sex offender management board from receiving a direct financial benefit from the standards or guidelines adopted by the board. “We all support proper handling of conflicts. We veto this bill today, however, because it is redundant and overbroad,” wrote Governor John Hickenlooper in the veto letter. He went on to say, “Despite the issues with HB 18-1427, recent media reports raise important issues as to the need for better conflict of management interests.”

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.

Bills Signed Regarding Domestic Violence Statute of Limitations, Prohibiting Use of Criminal Convictions to Deny Employment, and More

Concerning liability limits in snow and ice removal contractsOn Wednesday, May 30, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed 34 bills into law. He also signed one bill on Thursday, May 31, 2018. To date, he has signed 350 bills into law this legislative session, and sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature. Some of the bills signed Wednesday and Thursday include a bill continuing the Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice, a bill prioritizing support for foster parents, a bill providing municipal grants to reimburse local governments for the cost of defense counsel for certain defendants, a bill to fund Colorado Water Conservation Board projects, and more. The bills signed Wednesday and Thursday are summarized here.

  • HB 18-1004 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Income Tax Credit for a Qualifying Contribution to Promote Child Care in the State,” by Reps. James Coleman & James Wilson and Sens. Jack Tate & John Kefalas. A taxpayer who makes a monetary contribution to promote child care in the state is allowed an income tax credit that is equal to 50% of the total value of the contribution. This exemption is currently available for income tax years that commence prior to January 1, 2020. The bill extends the credit for 5 years.
  • HB 18-1070 – “Concerning an Increase in the Amount of Financial Assistance that can be Provided for Public School Capital Construction Under the ‘Building Excellent Schools Today Act,’ and, in Connection Therewith, Increasing the Amount of Retail Marijuana Excise Tax Revenue that is Credited to the Public School Capital Construction Assistance Fund and Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Dave Young & Cole Wist and Sens. Ray Scott & Rachel Zenzinger. Currently, the first $40 million of retail marijuana excise tax revenue annually collected is credited to the public school capital construction assistance fund for purposes of the ‘Building Excellent Schools Today Act’ and the remainder of the revenue is credited to the state public school fund.
  • HB 18-1094 – “Concerning the Reauthorization of the ‘Child Mental Health Treatment Act,’ and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Leslie Herod & Cole Wist and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Dominick Moreno. The bill extends indefinitely the ‘Child Mental Health Treatment Act’ and renames it the ‘Children and Youth Mental Health Treatment Act’. It also makes several changes to the act.
  • HB 18-1176 – “Concerning Continuation of the Grant Program in the Department of Corrections to Provide Funding to Eligible Community-Based Organizations that Provide Reentry Services to Offenders, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations in the 2017 Report of the Department of Regulatory Agencies,” by Reps. Pete Lee & Cole Wist and Sen. John Cooke. Under current law, a grant program exists in the Department of Corrections to provide funding to eligible community-based organizations that provide reentry services to offenders. The grant program is scheduled to repeal on September 1, 2018. The bill reschedules the repeal of the grant program to September 1, 2023. The bill also provides that, in awarding grants from the grant program, the department shall release as much as one quarter of the amount annually appropriated to the grant program to an intermediary at the beginning of each fiscal year.
  • HB 18-1189 – “Concerning Pilot Programs to Expand Effective Teacher Residency Programs Across the State, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & Lang Sias and Sens. Owen Hill & Nancy Todd. The bill creates the teacher residency expansion program in the Department of Education. The goal of the program is to identify and communicate to school districts, charter schools, and boards of cooperative services that operate public schools the best practices, effective strategies, and critical components of effective teacher residency programs and thereby facilitate expansion of the effective teacher residency programs across the state.
  • HB 18-1190 – “Concerning Modifications to the ‘Colorado Job Creation and Main Street Revitalization Act,'” by Reps. Daneya Esgar & Hugh McKean and Sens. Jack Tate & Leroy Garcia. The bill makes several modifications to the existing ‘Colorado Job Creation and Main Street Revitalization Act.’
  • HB 18-1236 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations in the Department of Regulatory Agencies’ Sunset Report,” by Reps. Barbara McLachlin & Jon Becker and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill implements the recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies in its sunset review and report on the Colorado food systems advisory council by extending the council indefinitely.
  • HB 18-1267 – “Concerning an Income Tax Credit for Retrofitting a Residence to Increase the Residence’s Visitability, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Matt Gray & Hugh McKean and Sen. Jack Tate. The bill provides an income tax credit to an individual who retrofits or hires someone to retrofit the individual’s residence, and makes several specifications concerning the retrofit.
  • HB 18-1287 – “Concerning the Extension of the Repeal of the Colorado Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Rep. Mike Weissman and Sens. Daniel Kagan & John Cooke. Current law repeals the Colorado commission on criminal and juvenile justice, effective July 1, 2018. The bill extends the repeal date to July 1, 2023, and requires the Department of Regulatory Agencies to perform a sunset review of the commission prior to such repeal.
  • HB 18-1295 – “Concerning Modifications to the ‘Colorado Food and Drug Act’ to Allow Products Containing Industrial Hemp, and, in Connection Therewith, Establishing that Products Containing Industrial Hemp are not Adulterated or Misbranded by Virtue of Containing Industrial Hemp,” by Reps. Joseph Salazar & Daneya Esgar and Sen. Don Coram. The bill establishes that food and cosmetics are not adulterated or misbranded by virtue of containing industrial hemp. The bill also sets forth the Department of Public Health and Environment’s powers with regard to applicants and registrants engaged in, or attempting to engage in, the wholesale food selling, manufacturing, processing, or storage of an industrial hemp product, as that term is defined in the bill.
  • HB 18-1321 – “Concerning Efficient Administration of Nonemergency Medical Transportation Within the Existing Benefit under the Medical Assistance Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making and Reducing an Appropriation,” by Reps. Hugh McKean & Jeni James Arndt and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Dominick Moreno. The bill requires the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing to create and implement a method for meeting urgent transportation needs within the existing nonemergency medical transportation benefit under the medical assistance program.
  • HB 18-1340 – “Concerning Transfers of Money to be Used for the State’s Infrastructure,” by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Kent Lambert. The bill makes several transfers of money through the 2018-19 fiscal year.
  • HB 18-1346 – “Concerning Child Abuse Related to Youth who are Under the Continuing Jurisdiction of the Court in an Out-of-Home Placement when they are Younger than Twenty-one Years of Age,” by Reps. Jim Smallwood & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Jim Smallwood & John Kefalas. The bill directs the Colorado commission on criminal and juvenile justice to study the issue of institutional child abuse for children and youth in facilities operated by the department of human services. On or before July 1, 2019, the commission shall provide a report with its findings and recommendations to the General Assembly.
  • HB 18-1348 – “Concerning Families Involved in the Child Welfare System, and, in Connection Therewith, Prioritizing Services and Providing Support for Foster Parents,” by Reps. Jonathan Singer & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Bob Gardner & John Kefalas. The bill allows foster parents access to certain information regarding a foster child or prospective foster child, including judicial information and education records. The bill requires that a county prioritize child care assistance for certified foster parents and certified kinship foster parents and for noncertified kinship care providers that provide care for children with an open child welfare case.
  • HB 18-1353 – “Concerning the Creation of a Grant Program to Reimburse Local Governments for Costs Associated with the Provision of Defense Counsel to Certain Defendants at their First Appearances in Municipal Courts, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Susan Lontine & Terri Carver and Sen. Vicki Marble. The bill creates the defense counsel on first appearance grant program in the division of local government within the Department of Local Affairs. The division shall award grants from the program to reimburse local governments, in part or in full, for costs associated with the provision of defense counsel to defendants at their first appearances in municipal courts.
  • HB 18-1354 – “Concerning a Requirement that Written Warranties for Powersports Vehicles be Honored,” by Rep. Hugh McKean and Sen. Rachel Zenzinger. Current law appears to forbid a powersports vehicle manufacturer or distributor from honoring written warranties. The bill clarifies that the powersports dealer is required to honor written warranties.
  • HB 18-1355 – “Concerning Changes to the Accountability System for the Elementary and Secondary Public Education System to Strengthen the Accountability System for the Benefit of Students,” by Reps. Brittany Pettersen & Lang Sias and Sens. Bob Gardner & Dominick Moreno. The bill changes the criteria that the Department of Education must consider in assigning an accreditation category to a school district or the state charter school institute or in recommending the type of performance plan that a public school must implement.
  • HB 18-1361 – “Concerning Expanded Eligibility for a Veteran of the Vietnam War Specialty License Plate,” by Reps. Tony Exum & Donald Valdez and Sen. Angela Williams. The bill extends the end date to be eligible for a veteran of the Vietnam war specialty license plate from January 27, 1973, to July 1, 1975.
  • HB 18-1364 – “Concerning the Continuation of the Colorado Advisory Council for Persons with Disabilities, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Sunset Review Recommendations of the Department of Regulatory Agencies, and Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Lois Landgraf and Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Rachel Zenzinger. The bill continues the Colorado advisory council for persons with disabilities, but transfers it from the office of the governor to the department of health care policy and financing. The makeup of the council is decreased from no more than 20 members to a total of 10 members, 3 of whom are nonvoting members. The newly appointed council shall convene its first meeting on or before August 1, 2018, and meet quarterly thereafter. The department is authorized to provide staff support to the council. The powers and duties of the council are expanded and articulated.
  • HB 18-1367 – “Concerning Professional Development in Leadership for Public School Principals, and, in Connection Therewith, Creating the School Leadership Pilot Program and Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. Barbara McLachlin & James Wilson and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill creates the school leadership pilot program  to provide professional development for public elementary, middle, and high school principals. During the 2018-19 budget year, the Department of Education is directed to design and implement the program or contract with a nonprofit entity to design and implement the program.
  • HB 18-1398 – “Concerning the Statute of Limitations for Commencing a Civil Action in Tort to Recover Damages for an Act of Domestic Violence,” by Reps. Matt Gray & Cole Wist and Sen. Bob Gardner. The bill states that any civil action to recover damages caused by an act of domestic violence must be commenced within 6 years after a disability has been removed for a person under disability or within 6 years after a cause of action accrues, whichever occurs later.
  • HB 18-1418 – “Concerning the Use of Criminal Convictions in Employment,” by Rep. Mike Weissman and Sens. Don Coram & Daniel Kagan. Current law directs a state or local agency, when deciding whether to issue a license or permit, to consider an individual’s criminal record in determining whether the individual is of good moral character. The bill changes the determination to consider whether the individual is qualified. The bill adds to the factors that an agency considers whether the applicant will be directly responsible for the care of individuals susceptible to abuse or mistreatment.
  • SB 18-001 – “Concerning Transportation Infrastructure Funding, and, in Connection Therewith, Requiring Specified Amounts to be Transferred from the General Fund to the State Highway Fund, the Highway Users Tax Fund, and a New Multimodal Transportation Options Fund During State Fiscal Years 2018-19 and 2019-20 for the Purpose of Funding Transportation Projects and to the State Highway Fund During Any State Fiscal Year from 2019-20 through 2038-39 for State Highway Purposes and to Repay any Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes that may be Issued as Specified in the Bill and, if no Citizen-Initiated Ballot Measure that Requires the State to Issue Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes is Approved by the Voters of the State at the November 2018 General Election, Requiring the Secretary of State to Submit a Ballot Question to the Voters of the State at the November 2019 Statewide Election, which, if Approved, Would Require the State, with no Increase in any Taxes, to Issue Additional Transportation Revenue Anticipation Notes for the Purpose of Addressing Critical Priority Transportation Needs in the State by Funding Transportation Projects; Would Exclude Note Proceeds and Investment Earnings on Note Proceeds from State Fiscal Year Spending Limits; and Would Reduce the Amount of Lease-Purchase Agreements Required by Current Law to be Issued for the Purpose of Funding Transportation Projects,” by Sens. Randy Baumgardner & John Cooke and Reps. Perry Buck & Faith Winter. The bill requires the state treasurer to transfer $500 million from the general fund to the state highway fund on June 30, 2019, and to transfer $250 million from the general fund to the state highway fund annually on June 30 of state fiscal years 2019-20 though 2038-39. Several other transfers are also specified.
  • SB 18-016 – “Concerning the Repeal Date for the Transfer of Money from Community Corrections to the Housing Assistance for Persons Transitioning from the Criminal or Juvenile Justice System Cash Fund, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Rhonda Fields and Reps. Jonathan Singer & Adrienne Benavidez. In 2017, the general assembly enacted a provision requiring at the end of the 2016-17 fiscal year the state treasurer to transfer unexpended and unencumbered money appropriated for community corrections programs to a new fund to assist persons transitioning from the criminal or juvenile justice systems. The act repealed the provision in 2018.
  • SB 18-062 – “Concerning Liability Limits in Snow and Ice Removal Contracts,” by Sen. Dominick Moreno and Rep. Jovan Melton. The bill enacts the ‘Snow Removal Service Liability Limitation Act’, which makes void provisions of snow removal agreements that require one party to indemnify the other party for damages, hold the other party harmless for damages, and provide for the defense of the other party in a liability lawsuit.
  • SB 18-086 – “Concerning the Use of Cyber Coding Cryptology for State Records, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Kent Lambert & Angela Williams and Reps. Joann Ginal & Bob Rankin. The chief information security officer in the governor’s office of information technology (OIT), the director of OIT, the department of state, and the executive director of the department of regulatory agencies are required to take certain actions to protect state records containing trusted sensitive and confidential information from criminal, unauthorized, or inadvertent manipulation or theft.
  • SB 18-087 – “Concerning In-state Tuition at Institutions of Higher Education for Certain Foreign Nationals Legally Settled in Colorado,” by Sen. Stephen Fenberg and Reps. Dafna Michaelson Jenet & Faith Winter. The bill contains a legislative declaration about the circumstances facing special immigrants and refugees and the benefit of access to education. The bill grants eligibility for in-state tuition status to refugees and special immigrants admitted to the United States pursuant to federal law who have settled in Colorado.
  • SB 18-218 – “Concerning the Funding of Colorado Water Conservation Board Projects, and, in Connection Therewith, Making Appropriations,” by Sen. Don Coram and Rep. Jeni James Arndt. The bill appropriates money from the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) construction fund to the CWCB or the division of water resources in the department of natural resources for certain projects.
  • SB 18-219 – “Concerning the Rates a Motor Vehicle Dealer Charges a Motor Vehicle Manufacturer for Work Performed by the Dealer in Accordance with a Warranty Obligation,” by Sen. Jack Tate and Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp. The bill requires motor vehicle manufacturers to fulfill warranty obligations. A manufacturer must compensate each of its motor vehicle dealers in accordance with a set of standards designed to reflect the current market rate for labor and the profit margin on parts the dealer can expect to obtain. Dealers must submit certain repair orders to the manufacturer as required by the bill to establish compensation rates.
  • SB 18-231 – “Concerning a Task Force on the Transition of Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities from Educational Services to Home- and Community-Based Services, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Kent Lambert & Dominick Moreno and Rep. Dave Young. The bill establishes a task force for transition planning to make recommendations on improvements for the transition of individuals with disabilities who are receiving services and supports in an educational setting to receiving services and supports through home- and community-based services. It specifies membership on the task force and duties including making a report to specified committees of the general assembly.
  • SB 18-232 – “Concerning a Clarification of the Calculation used to Determine the Amount of Money that Must be Spent to Acquire Works of Art for Capital Construction Projects that are the Subject of a Lease-Purchase Agreement,” by Sens. Jerry Sonnenberg & John Kefalas and Reps. Daneya Esgar & Chris Hansen. The bill clarifies that for any capital construction project that is the subject of a lease-purchase agreement, the one percent of the total construction costs that is required to be used for the acquisition of works of art is calculated on the state-funded portion of the total construction costs and not on the total construction costs.
  • SB 18-234 – “Concerning Measures to Reduce the sale Without Consent of the Remains of a Human who was Born Alive, and, in Connection Therewith, Registering Nontransplant Tissue Banks and Prohibiting Certain Owners of Nontransplant Tissue Banks from Owning Certain Other Businesses that Provide for the Final Disposition of Human Remains, and Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Don Coram & Larry Crowder and Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Marc Catlin. The bill makes it unlawful under the ‘Mortuary Science Code’ for a person to own more than a 10% indirect interest in a funeral establishment or crematory while simultaneously owning interest in a nontransplant tissue bank.
  • SB 18-248 – “Concerning the Treatment under Statutory Provisions Governing Tax Increment Financing of Revenues Received by an Urban Renewal Authority Following Certain Voter-Approved Revenue Increases,” by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Reps. Polly Lawrence & Matt Gray. Under current law, in connection with the use of a special fund of an urban renewal authority to collect the increment used to finance urban renewal projects, any additional revenues received by a municipality, county, special district, or school district  resulting because the voters have authorized the taxing entity to retain and spend such money under the TABOR requirements of the state constitution after the creation of the fund or as a result of an increase in the property tax mill levy approved by the voters of the taxing entity after the creation of the fund are not included in the amount of the increment that is allocated to and, when collected, paid into the special fund. Under the bill, such additional revenues that have been received because of the 2 specified forms of voter-approved revenue changes are restricted from being pledged by an authority for the payment of any bonds of, or any loans or advances to, or any indebtedness incurred by the authority without the consent of the relevant taxing entity.
  • SB 18-249 – “Concerning Establishing Alternative Programs in the Criminal Justice System to Divert Individuals with a Mental Health Condition to Community Treatment, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Bob Gardner & Kent Lambert and Reps. Pete Lee & Dave Young. The bill creates up to 4 pilot programs in judicial districts in the state that divert individuals with low-level criminal behavior and a mental health condition to community resources and treatment rather than continued criminal justice involvement. The programs must be developed in accordance with the principles and proposed model recommended by the Colorado commission on criminal and juvenile justice, adopted on January 12, 2018.
  • SB 18-271 – “Concerning Changes to Improve Funding for Marijuana Research, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Vicki Marble and Rep. Dan Pabon. Subject to rules of the marijuana enforcement division, the bill authorizes marijuana research and development licensees and marijuana research and development cultivation licensees (research licensees) to transfer unused marijuana within the regulated marijuana industry; and research licensees to be co-located at the premises of a medical marijuana-infused products manufacturer or a retail marijuana products manufacturer.
  • SB 18-272 – “Concerning Suicide Prevention Training in Schools, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sens. Beth Martinez Humenik & Nancy Todd and Reps. Terri Carver & Barbara McLachlin. The bill creates the crisis and suicide prevention training grant program in the Department of Public Health and Environment. The purpose of the grant program is to provide financial assistance to schools in providing crisis and suicide prevention training to schools, with priority given to those schools that have previously not received such training. The grant program may authorize up to $400,000 in grants per year in varying amounts. The office of suicide prevention and the school safety resource center shall work collaboratively with the department to develop guidelines and criteria for the grant program. Grant recipients are required to report on their activities using grant money.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2018 legislative decisions, click here.