April 25, 2015

Crowdfunding, Medical Testing of Assault Victims, and PERA Supplemental Needs Trust Bills Signed

As the 2015 legislative session continues, Governor Hickenlooper continues to sign legislation that crosses his desk. To date, the governor has signed 136 bills this legislative session. The bills signed in the past week are summarized here.

April 10, 2015

  • HB 15-1008 – Concerning the Classification of Agricultural Land When the Land is Destroyed by a Natural Cause, by Rep. Millie Hamner and Sen. Ellen Roberts. The bill allows agricultural land destroyed by natural causes to retain its agricultural classification for the year of destruction and four more property tax years.
  • HB 15-1256 – Concerning the Reclassification of Routt County to a Category II County for the Purpose of Establishing the Salaries of County Officers, by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sen. Randy Baumgardner. The bill recategorizes Routt County as a category II county for the purpose of setting salaries for county officers.
  • HB 15-1073 – Concerning Allowing a Driver to Challenge the Validity of a Law Enforcement Officer’s Initial Contact With the Driver, by Rep. Joseph Salazar and Sen. Jessie Ulibarri. The bill allows drivers who successfully challenge an officer’s initial stop in an administrative hearing to avoid revocation.
  • HB 15-1197 – Concerning Limitations on Indemnity Obligations in Public Construction Contracts, by Rep. Jack Tate and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill clarifies the manner in which indemnification clauses may be used in public construction contracts.
  • HB 15-1224 – Concerning Accounting for State Moneys Received by Public Postsecondary Institutions That Do Not Participate in the College Opportunity Fund Program, by Rep. Diane Mitsch Bush and Sens. Owen Hill & Nancy Todd. The bill separates the appropriation allocation for the two local district junior colleges affected.
  • HB 15-1183 – Concerning the Admission of a Child’s Statements Describing Attempted Acts of an Unlawful Sexual Offense, by Rep. Rhonda Fields and Sen. Lucia Guzman. The bill allows admission of a child’s statements regarding attempted sexual offenses.
  • HB 15-1191 – Concerning the Addition of Dentists to the “Physician Designation Disclosure Act,” by Rep. Brittany Pettersen and Sen. Kevin Grantham. The bill specifies that the standards and requirements for health care entities that assign designations to physicians based on performance assessments also apply to dentists.

Monday, April 13, 2015

  • HB 15-1245 – Concerning the Authority of the State Board of Land Commissioners to Use a Specified Portion of the Investment and Development Fund Moneys for Asset Maintenance, by Rep. Edward Vigil and Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill allows the State Board of Land Commissioners to spend up to $1 million from the Investment and Development Fund for certain maintenance projects.
  • HB 15-1246 – Concerning the Authorization of Crowdfunding of Intrastate Securities, by Reps. Pete Lee & Dan Pabon and Sens. Mark Scheffel & Owen Hill. The bill creates the Colorado Crowdfunding Act, which allows online investments in Colorado companies through a simple regulatory regime.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

  • SB 15-005 – Concerning Medical Testing for Certain First Degree Assault Cases, by Sen. John Cooke and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill requires a defendant in a first degree assault to submit to blood testing for communicable diseases if his or her bodily fluids contact another person.
  • SB 15-015 – Concerning a Clarification of Benefits for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Health Benefit Plans Issued in this State, by Sen. John Kefalas and Rep. Dianne Primavera. The bill allows mental health benefits under health benefit plans for autism spectrum disorders, and removes caps on the number of visits.
  • SB 15-030 – Concerning Removing Culpability for Prostitution for a Victim of Human Trafficking, by Sen. Morgan Carroll and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill creates an affirmative defense of human trafficking for those charged with prostitution and establishes a procedure to petition courts to seal records.
  • SB 15-058 – Concerning Statewide Policies and Procedures for Law Enforcement Agencies that Conduct Eyewitness Identifications, by Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Elena Kagan. The bill requires law enforcement agencies to develop policies and procedures regarding eyewitness identifications.
  • SB 15-097 – Concerning the Eligibility of a Supplemental Needs Trust to Receive Certain Public Employees’ Retirement Association Benefits, by Sen. Irene Aguilar and Rep. Lois Landgraf. The bill allows a PERA member to designate a supplemental needs trust as a co-beneficiary.
  • SB 15-099 – Concerning Eliminating Certain Duties for Probation Officers, by Sen. John Cooke  and Rep. Polly Lawrence. The bill eliminates  certain duties of probation officers to conform to actual practice.
  • SB 15-105 – Concerning the Continuation of the Regulation of Respiratory Therapists by the Director of the Division of Professions and Occupations in the Department of Regulatory Agencies, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the Department in its Sunset Review of and Report on the Profession, by Sen. Beth Martinez Humenik and Rep. Diane Primavera. The bill makes changes to licensing of respiratory therapists as recommended by the sunset review committee.
  • SB 15-126 – Concerning Medical Tests for Victims of Crimes of Assault, by Sens. John Cooke & Michael Johnston and Rep. Mike Foote. The bill requires defendants in second or third degree assault cases to undergo medical testing for communicable diseases if their bodily fluids came in contact with another person.
  • SB 15-171 – Concerning the Continuation of the “Private Occupational Education Act of 1981″, and, in Connection Therewith, Implementing the Recommendations of the 2014 Sunset Review by the Department of Regulatory Agencies, by Sen. Owen Hill and Rep. Dominick Moreno. The bill extends the Private Occupational School Board and the Division of Private Occupational Schools.
  • SB 15-186 – Concerning the Exemption of Yoga Teacher Training from Regulation Under Statutes Governing Private Occupational Education and, in Connection Therewith, Reducing an Appropriation, by Sen. Laura Woods and Reps. Timothy Dore & Alec Garnett. The bill exempts yoga teacher training from the Private Occupational Education Act.
  • SB 15-187 – Concerning Authorization for the High-Performance Transportation Enterprise to Deposit Money Received as a Loan from the State Highway Fund to a Separate Account Within the Statewide Transportation Enterprise Special Revenue Fund, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Dave Young. The bill allows money loaned from the State Highway Fund to the High Performance Transportation Enterprise to be deposited into the Statewide Transportation Enterprise Operating Fund.
  • SB 15-188 – Concerning the Use of the First Tier of Statutorily Allocated Tobacco Litigation Settlement Money, and in Connection Therewith, Making an Annual Statutory Allocation of Such Money to the Tobacco Settlement Defense Account of the Tobacco Litigation Settlement Cash Fund and Making an Offsetting Reduction in the Annual Statutory Allocation of Such Money to the Children’s Basic Health Plan Trust, Authorizing the Department of Revenue to Use Money in the Tobacco Settlement Defense Account for Settlement Enforcement Related Activities, and Making an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill allocates tobacco settlement funds from the Children’s Basic Health Plan Trust to the defense fund for tobacco litigation.
  • SB 15-189 – Concerning the Repeal of Consolidated Tobacco Settlement Program Monitoring and Reporting Requirements and, in Connection Therewith, Reducing an Appropriation, by Sen. Pat Steadman and Rep. Bob Rankin. The bill repeals the current requirement that the State Board of Health monitor programs receiving funding from the state’s tobacco settlement fund.
  • SB 15-190 – Concerning the Repeal of the Requirement that the Executive Director of the Department of Personnel Promulgate Rules to Establish State Archives’ Fees, by Sen. Kevin Grantham and Rep. Millie Hamner. The bill eliminates a statutory requirement that fees for the State Archives must be established through a formal rulemaking process.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Forms for Restricted Account, Sealing Minor In Possession Records, Instructions for Adoptions, and More Amended

In March and April 2015, the Colorado State Judicial Branch amended several forms and instructions in many different categories. Forms are available for download here as PDFs and from the State Judicial website as Word documents and PDFs.

ADOPTION

  • JDF 498 – “Instructions for Kinship Adoption” (revised 03/15)
  • JDF 499 – “Instructions for Custodial Adoption” (revised 03/15)

DOMESTIC RELATIONS

  • JDF 1302 – “Order for Publication of Summons/Service by Certified Mail/Publication by Consolidated Notice” (revised 03/15)

EVICTIONS AND FORECLOSURES

  • JDF 100 – “Instructions for Forcible Entry and Detainer (FED)/Eviction” (revised 03/15)
  • JDF 140 – “Instructions for Forcible Entry and Detainer (FED)/Eviction for Owner Occupied Mobile Home” (revised 04/15)

GARNISHMENTS AND JUDGMENTS

  • JDF 84 – “Notice to Terminate Income Assignment” (revised 03/15)

MISCELLANEOUS

  • JDF 5“Authorization to Pay a Law Firm for Attorney Appointments” (revised 03/15)
  • JDF 98 – “Affidavit of Service” (revised 03/15)

PROBATE

  • JDF 866 – “Order for Deposit of Funds to Restricted Account and Annual Filing of Restricted Account Report” (revised 04/15)
  • JDF 896 – “Restricted Account Report” (revised 04/15)

SEAL MY CASE

  • JDF 314 – “Order Regarding the Sealing of Records Related to Illegal Possession or Consumption of Ethyl Alcohol by an Underage Person (MIP) Pursuant to § 18-13-122(10), C.R.S.” (revised 03/15)
  • JDF 314 – “Order Regarding the Sealing of Records Related to Illegal Possession or Consumption of Ethyl Alcohol or Marijuana by an Underage Person (MIP) Pursuant to § 18-13-122(13), C.R.S.” (revised 03/15)

For all of State Judicial’s forms, click here.

Frederick Skillern: Real Estate Case Law — Titles and Title Insurance (1)

Editor’s note: This is Part 16 of a series of posts in which Denver-area real estate attorney Frederick Skillern provides summaries of case law pertinent to real estate practitioners (click here for previous posts). These updates originally appeared as materials for the 32nd Annual Real Estate Symposium in July 2014.

frederick-b-skillernBy Frederick B. Skillern

Grosboll v. Grosboll (In re Estate of Grossboll)
Colorado Court of Appeals, October 24, 2013
2013 COA 141

Partnership property; statute of frauds.

Jo Ann Grosboll, decedents’ daughter, appeals the district court’s order finding that the sales proceeds of an apartment building are an asset of the parents’ estates rather than an asset of Grosboll Manor, L.L.L.P., a limited partnership formed by Jo Ann and her parents. Jo Ann’s brother, understandably, argues that the apartments are property of the estate. The key issue revolves around the fact that there is no deed of conveyance to the partnership.

As a matter of first impression, the court considers whether real property owned individually by one who enters into a partnership with others may become a partnership asset without a written conveyance sufficient to satisfy the statute of frauds. The court holds that a written conveyance (such as a deed) from a partner to the partnership is not necessarily required.

The court reviews the historical development of the entity theory of partnerships and the Uniform Partnership Act. The current version of the partnership act allows real property titled in an individual partner’s name to be deemed an asset of the partnership. The trust relationship between partners provides adequate protection against fraud in oral agreements making a partner’s real property a partnership asset. As a result, by statute, the intention of the partners determines whether such real property is a partnership asset. The existence of a written conveyance is a factor for a court to consider in evaluating that intent.

Jo Ann contended that, according to the terms of the written partnership agreement and the intention of the partners, Loma Vista was a partnership asset. The partnership agreement provided that (1) title to all assets of the partnership shall be deemed to be owned by the partnership”; (2) record title to any or all assets of the partnership may be held in the name of . . . one or more nominees”; and (3) all assets of the partnership shall be recorded as the property of the partnership in the books and records of the partnership, irrespective of the name in which record title to such assets is held.” Jo Ann testified that when the partnership was established, she and her parents had agreed to make Loma Vista a partnership asset. Additionally, the accountant for the partnership testified that he treated Loma Vista as a partnership asset on the partnership books. Therefore, Jo Ann asserted she was entitled to the sale proceeds because decedents’ wills devised their interests in the partnership to her.

The partnership act provides a rebuttable presumption that a partner’s property is separate if it is not acquired with partnership assets:

Property acquired in the name of one or more of the partners, without an indication in the instrument transferring title to the property of the person’s capacity as a partner or of the existence of a partnership and without use of partnership assets is presumed to be separate property, even if used for partnership purposes.

C.R.S. § 7-64-204(4).

Because the UPL and UPA specifically contemplate that real property titled in an individual partner’s name may be deemed an asset of the partnership, the appeals court holds here that a written conveyance from a partner who originally brings real estate into the partnership, although a factor to consider, is not required to convert real property into partnership property.

Frederick B. Skillern, Esq., is a director and shareholder with Montgomery Little & Soran, P.C., practicing in real estate and related litigation and appeals. He serves as an expert witness in cases dealing with real estate, professional responsibility and attorney fees, and acts as a mediator and arbitrator in real estate cases. Before joining Montgomery Little in 2003, Fred was in private practice in Denver for 6 years with Carpenter & Klatskin and for 10 years with Isaacson Rosenbaum. He served as a district judge for Colorado’s Eighteenth Judicial District from 2000 through 2002. Fred is a graduate of Dartmouth College, and received his law degree at the University of Colorado in 1976, in another day and time in which the legal job market was simply awful.

Bills Regarding Trustee Notification, Recorded Documents, and More Signed

On Wednesday, March 18, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper signed nine bills into law. Governor Hickenlooper has now signed 58 bills this legislative session. The bills signed Wednesday are summarized here.

  • HB 15-1010 – Concerning a Presumption that a Trustee has Notified a Beneficiary when the Trustee has Adopted a Beneficiary Notification Procedure, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying that a Trustee May Deliver Information to Beneficiaries Electronically, by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Dan Nordberg and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill creates a presumption that a beneficiary of a trust has received notifications about the status of a trust when the trustee has notification procedures in place, and also allows electronic notifications for beneficiaries who elect electronic notifications.
  • HB 15-1022 – Concerning Juveniles Charged with Certain Minor Offenses, by Rep. Beth McCann and Sens. Pat Steadman & John Cooke. The bill allows police officers to issue petty offense tickets to juveniles if certain conditions are met.
  • HB 15-1028 – Concerning Repeal of the Mercantile Licensing Standards, by Rep. Jon Keyser and Sen. Cheri Jahn. The bill repeals licensing requirements for merchants because the requirements are not enforced.
  • HB 15-1062 – Concerning Increasing the Penalties for Persons who Engage in Animal Fighting, by Reps. Jovan Melton & Steve Lebsock and Sens. David Balmer & Jerry Sonnenberg. The bill requires mandatory fines for convictions for animal fighting.
  • HB 15-1064 – Concerning Access to the Safe Deposit Box of a Decedent, and, in Connection Therewith, Limiting the Obligations of Custodians who Access the Box, by Rep. Dan Nordberg and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill clarifies who has access to a decedent’s safe deposit box under the Colorado Probate Code and and clarifies that the custodian is not deemed to have knowledge about the contents of the box.
  • HB 15-1069 – Concerning Information Required to be Included in Recorded Written Instruments Filed with the County Clerk and Recorder to Claim a Homestead Exemption, by Rep. Su Ryden and Sen. Chris Holbert. The bill adds a requirement that a property owner’s name be included on a homestead exemption document.
  • HB 15-1071 – Concerning Clarification that, Following a Merger of Entities, the Surviving Entity is Entitled to Control the Premerger Attorney-Client Privileges of a Constituent Entity, by Rep. Jon Keyser and Sen. Owen Hill. The bill specifies that a corporation that merges with another entity inherits the attorney-client privilege from the other entity.
  • SB 15-057 – Concerning the Reporting Requirements of the Colorado Clean Claims Task Force, by Sen. David Balmer and Rep. Angela Williams. The bill changes the reporting requirements for the Colorado Medical Clean Claims Task Force so that the reports will go to the Commissioner of Insurance and the business committee of the General Assembly.
  • SB 15-142 – Concerning a Change in State Law to Make Requirements for Moneys Held in Escrow for the Payment of Ad Valorem Property Taxes the Same as the Requirements of the Federal “Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act of 1974″, by Sen. Ellen Roberts and Rep. Dan Pabon. The bill conforms state law to the requirements of the federal Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, specifically repealing May 30 date for final settlement and changing the provision to reference RESPA.

For a complete list of Governor Hickenlooper’s 2015 legislative decisions, click here.

Tenth Circuit: Citizenship of Beneficiaries to Trust Necessary to Determine Diversity Jurisdiction

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in ConAgra Foods, Inc. v. Americold Logistics, LLC on Tuesday, January 27, 2015.

Multiple plaintiffs brought suit against Americold Logistics, LLC and Americold Realty Trust (collectively, Americold) in Kansas state court. Americold removed to the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, asserting complete diversity of the parties. No party challenged removal and the district court did not address the issue. The district court granted summary judgment to Americold and plaintiffs timely appealed on the merits. On appeal, the Tenth Circuit noticed a potential defect in the notice of removal and ordered Americold to file supplemental briefing to address whether Americold’s Notice of Removal was sufficient to establish diversity jurisdiction and, if not, what curative facts could correct the defect in the appeal?

In its supplemental briefing, Americold asserted the omission of the citizenship of the beneficiaries of the Americold Realty Trust was not a jurisdictional defect because the citizenship of a trust is determined solely by the citizenship of its trustees. The Tenth Circuit disagreed. After analyzing Supreme Court precedent in Navarro and Carden, the Tenth Circuit found the citizenship of a trust depends on not only the citizenship of the trustees but also that of its beneficiaries. The Tenth Circuit ruled that when a trustee is a party to litigation, it is the trustee’s citizenship that controls for diversity jurisdiction purposes, as long as the trustee satisfies Navarro‘s real-party-in-interest test. However, when a trust itself is party to the litigation, the citizenship of the trust is derived from all of the trust’s “members.” In this case, the Tenth Circuit found that at a minimum the trust’s “members” were its beneficiaries.

The Tenth Circuit found Americold failed to meet its burden to establish diversity jurisdiction because it failed to present evidence of the citizenship of its beneficiaries. The Tenth Circuit remanded to the district court to vacate its judgment on the merits and remand to state court.

In Memoriam: Billie Castle

Billie_CastleBillie Castle, Grand Junction trust and estate attorney and former author and speaker for CBA-CLE, died on February 22, 2015, at St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction. Billie was respected and admired by colleagues and clients alike. She was a solo practitioner at the Law Office of Billie M. Castle, where she offered estate planning, disability planning, Medicaid, will probates, and preparation of wills and trusts.

Billie wrote a chapter, “Medicaid: Use of Trusts in Medicaid Planning,” in the Colorado Elder Law Handbook from 2004 to 2007, and she co-authored the “Trusts in Long-Term Care and Disability Planning” chapter in the Colorado Estate Planning Handbook (Orange Book Handbook) from 2006 to 2009. She was also faculty at the Colorado Estate Planning Retreat from 2004 to 2007. She was a CBA member and a former chair of the CBA Elder Law Section. She was certified by the National Elder Law Foundation as a Certified Elder Law Attorney, and wrote numerous articles on estate planning, Medicaid, and trusts.

Billie was a native of Colorado’s western slope and a strong supporter of Colorado Mesa University, where she received her undergraduate degree, summa cum laude. She received her law degree, magna cum laude, from Willamette University in Oregon, where she was ranked second in her class. She served on the Willamette Law Review and clerked for the Marion County District Attorney’s Office while in law school.

A memorial service will be held on Thursday, February 26 in Grand Junction. Tributes to and memories of Billie can be left on this webpage. To donate in Billie’s memory to her charity of choice, Colorado Mesa University Foundation, click here.

e-Legislative Report: February 17, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Meeting held Friday, February 13

SB 15-129 — Preserving Parent-child Relationships
Sponsor: Senator Kevin Lundberg (R)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill in part because of the fundamental way that it changed the presumption of parenting time away from the “best interest of the child” to a different standard more focused on the parents in divorce proceedings. The bill was heard in committee on Wednesday the 11th and was passed on a party line vote after substantial amendments. SB-129 was referred to the Appropriations Committee for consideration of the bill’s fiscal impact.

SB 15-174 — Uniform Substitute Decision Making Documents Act
Sponsor: Senator Patrick Steadman (D)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill. The committee felt that the bill conflicts with existing statute, was unnecessary in many respects and that it potentially created more gaps and questions with existing law than its adoption would solve.

HB 15-1091 — Policies On Juvenile Shackling In Court
Sponsors: Representative Susan Lontine (D), Senator Michael G. Merrifield (D)
The LPC was concerned that while this bill was very well intentioned, it raised significant potential problems with separation of power between the legislative and judicial branches.

At the Capitol: Week of February 9

SB 15-049 — Real Estate Title Vests In Entity Once Formed
Sponsors: Senator Beth Martinez Humenik (R), Representative Jon Keyser (R)
This bill, supported by the Bar, passed through the Senate this past week. It has been assigned to the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee and has not yet been calendared for a hearing.

HB 15-1121 — Wind Energy Generation
Sponsors: Representative Jon Becker (R), Senator Jerry Sonnenberg (R)
The bill, supported by the Bar, also passed through its first chamber (the House) last week. It will next be heard in the Senate, where it has been assigned to the Agriculture, Natural Resources & Energy Committee. It will be heard by that committee on February 19.

SB 15-077 — Parents’ Bill of Rights
Sponsors: Senator Tim Neville (R), Representative Patrick Neville (R)
The bill passed out of the Senate committee hearing on a party line vote, and was debated on the floor. The bill was passed with amendments, and now moves to the House for consideration. It has not been calendared for consideration.

SB 15-042 — Mandatory Reports Of Animal Abuse
Sponsors: Senator Jerry Sonnenberg (R), Representative Jon Becker (R)
This bill was Postponed Indefinitely (killed) in committee. It will not be considered again this year. The CBA was opposed to the legislation.

HB 15-1101 — Public Defender ADC Records Open Records
Sponsors: Representatives Rhonda Fields (D), Polly Lawrence (R)
This bill was Postponed Indefinitely (killed) in committee. It will not be considered again this year. The CBA was opposed to the legislation.

HB 15-1174 — Information Protections Domestic Violence Victims
Sponsors: Representative Terri Carver (R), Senator Laura Woods (R)
The CBA has not taken a position on this bill—though we are working with the sponsors to ensure that the program will work as intended and not harm the real estate transaction process as a result of its adoption or implementation. It is likely that the CBA and its sections will participate in stakeholder groups and work sessions this summer.

New Bills of Interest

Senate

SB 15-177 — HOA Construction Defect Lawsuit Approval Timelines
Sponsors: Brian DelGrosso (R), Mark Scheffel (R), Jonathan Singer (D), Jessie M. Ulibarri (D)
The bill states that when the governing documents of a common interest community require mediation or arbitration of a construction defect claim and the requirement is later amended or removed, mediation or arbitration is still required for a construction defect claim. These provisions are in section 2 of the bill.

Section 2 also specifies that the mediation or arbitration must take place in the judicial district in which the community is located and that the arbitrator must:

  • Be a neutral third party;
  • Make certain disclosures before being selected; and
  • Be selected as specified in the common interest community’s governing documents or, if not so specified, in accordance with the uniform arbitration act.

Section 1 adds definitions of key terms. Section 3 requires that before a construction defect claim is filed on behalf of the association:

  • The parties must submit the matter to mediation before a neutral third party; and The board must give advance notice to all unit owners, together with a disclosure of the projected costs, duration, and financial impact of the construction defect claim, and must obtain the written consent of the owners of units to which at least a majority of the votes in the association are allocated.

Section 4 adds to the disclosures required prior to the purchase and sale of property in a common interest community a notice that the community’s governing documents may require binding arbitration of certain disputes.

House

HB 15-1025 — Competency To Proceed Juvenile Justice System
Sponsors: Representative Paul Rosenthal (D), Senator Linda M. Newell (D)
The bill establishes a juvenile-specific definition of “incompetent to proceed” for juveniles involved in the juvenile justice system, as well as specific definitions for “developmental disability”, “intellectual disability”, “mental capacity”, and “mental disability” when used in this context. The bill clarifies the procedures for establishing incompetency, as well as for establishing the restoration of competency.

HB 15-1216 — Basis For Expert Opinion Testimony
Sponsors: Representative Kevin Priola (R), Senator John Cooke (R)
The bill prohibits a person from testifying concerning the person’s expert opinion unless certain conditions are met.

e-Legislative Report: February 10, 2015

legislationCBA Legislative Policy Committee

For followers who are new to CBA legislative activity, the Legislative Policy Committee (“LPC”) is the CBA’s legislative policy making arm during the legislative session. The LPC meets weekly during the legislative session to determine CBA positions from requests from the various sections and committees of the Bar Association.

Meeting held Friday, February 6
The following bills were discussed for action during last Friday’s LPC meeting.  Other bills of interest from that agenda are tracked and updated below.

SB 15-042 – Mandatory Reports Of Animal Abuse
(Senator Sonnenberg & Representative J. Becker)
The intent of the sponsors was to criminalize the recording of undercover videos showing animal cruelty in farming practices.  The Bar sections could not support the bill, or a subsequent “strike below”* amendment, because the language was overly broad, potentially unconstitutional and would lead to unintended consequences.  The LPC voted to oppose this bill at the recommendation of the Animal Law and Agricultural Law Sections.

HB 15-1101 – Public Defender ADC Records Open Records
(Representatives Field and Lawrence)
The LPC voted to oppose this bill as well.  The committee was concerned about the impact of Rule 1.6 and the financial impact of the bill to the State.  There was also concern that this bill would open the door for CORA requests of the Judicial Branch – and the potential impact that would have.  The LPC voted unanimously to oppose this bill.

HB 15-1037 – Freedom of Conscience Higher Ed
(Representative Priola & Senator Neville)
This bill was considered at the request of the Civil Rights Committee who presented that the bill was intended to “protect religious freedom and the right of association.”  After some discussion, the LPC voted to take no position on this bill.

At the Capitol: Week of February 2

HB 15-1135 – Terminally Ill Individuals End-of-life Decisions
(Representatives Court and Ginal & Senator Guzman)
HB 1135 was the big bill last week at the capitol.  Testimony began a little after 9:30am and concluded shortly before 10pm!  The emotional level of testimony was compelling.  There were approximately 120 people that signed up to testify for the bill ranging from all types of organizations and all walks of life. Many made passionate testimony on both sides of the bill which was a true indicator that our group made the correct policy decision to fix the issues and then maintain our neutrality. It is an issue that people either feel at a core level to support or they don’t.  The Committee voted to send the bill to the next committee Appropriations.  That motion failed 8-5.  There was a motion to Postpone the bill indefinitely, (passing 9-4) killing the bill for the remainder of the session.

Many Bar sections weighed in on the bill, its technical merits, and the drafting problems of the bill.  While individual sections had vigorous debates on the policy of “death with dignity” or physician assisted suicide, the LPC took no position on the bill itself.

SB 15-077 – Parents’ Bill of Rights
(Senator Neville & Representative Neville)
This Senate Bill sponsored by the father-son legislative team from Jefferson County was heard and passed out of the Senate committee last week.  The bill is set for its key second reading on Wednesday. Senate Bill 77, the so-called “Parents’ Bill of Rights” sponsored by Sen. Tim Neville and Rep. Patrick Neville, would give parents certain rights over the health care, education and mental health care of minor children.  The Bar Association voted to oppose this legislation at its LPC meeting on January 30.

SB 15-049 – Real Estate Title Vests In Entity Once Formed
(Senator Martinez Humenik & Representative Keyser)
This bill – supported by the bar – continues through the legislature on a straightforward course. It has now passed the Senate and will be heard in the Hose Business Affairs and Labor Committee, where Rep. Keyser will be the key sponsor.

HB 15-1121 – Wind Energy Generation
(Representative J. Becker & Senator Sonnenberg)
This Bar supported bill is also progressing through the legislative process.  Representative Becker has successfully completed the House process, and the bill passes to Senator Sonnenberg for the final leg of its legislative journey.

New Bills of Interest

Senate

SB 15-129 – Preserving Parent-child Relationships
(Senator Lundberg)
The bill amends provisions relating to best interests of a child in domestic relations actions and certain other actions in the juvenile code. With respect to such actions, the bill:

Amends the legislative declaration to emphasize the fundamental liberty interest of both parents and children in maintaining the parent-child relationship;

With respect to temporary orders hearings, if there has been a temporary or permanent protection order entered against one or both parties either prior to or in conjunction with the domestic relations action, requires the court to grant an expedited hearing at the request of either party for purposes of modifying provisions in the protection order relating to parenting time, communication, and access to a child. The court shall order substantially equal parenting time and access to the child unless it finds that such orders are clearly not in the child’s best interest. The court shall also enter any orders necessary for the safety of the protected party relating to the restrained party’s parenting time with the child.

Changes the nature of an investigation by a court-appointed child and family investigator (CFI) from evaluation and recommendations to investigation and fact-finding. CFIs will conduct an objective investigation of issues as specifically directed by the court and will provide written factual findings to the court that are supported by credible evidence. A CFI’s report will not make recommendations regarding the allocation of parental responsibilities but will provide the court with the factual findings the court deems necessary to make such determinations.

Amends language in the legislative declaration regarding the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities relating to the best interests of the child. Also, the bill requires the court to allocate substantially equal parenting time unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall award mutual decision-making responsibilities with respect to the child unless the court finds that such an order is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

For purposes of temporary orders in a domestic relations action, requires the court to award substantially equal parenting time to the parties unless the court finds that doing so would endanger a child’s physical health or significantly impair the child’s emotional development. In addition, the court shall order mutual decision-making responsibilities unless mutual decision-making is clearly not in the child’s best interest.

Changes the nature of an evaluation by a court-appointed parental responsibilities evaluator to an investigation by a mental health professional. The mental health investigation is limited to mental health diagnoses, assessments of relevant addictions, or other mental health-related issues that are relevant to the court’s allocation of parental responsibilities for the child. The investigator’s report shall contain findings of fact but shall not contain conclusions or recommendations relating to the allocation of parental rights and responsibilities.

Clarifies that the 2-year restriction on filing motions that request a substantial change in parenting time and that also change the party with whom the child resides the majority of the time do not apply to moderate changes to parenting time when the existing parenting time order awarded substantially equal parenting time to the parties; and

Amends the provisions relating to modification of decision-making responsibility for a child from requiring the court to retain the prior decision-maker unless certain criteria are met to permitting the court to change the decision-maker after considering certain criteria, including whether an award of mutual decision-making responsibilities is now in the child’s best interest.

SB 15-174 – Uniform Substitute Decision Making Documents Act
(Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill adopts, with amendments, the “Uniform Substitute Decision-making Documents Act” as Colorado law. The bill establishes the circumstances under which a substitute decision-making document (document) executed outside this state is valid in this state. A person may assume in good faith that a document is genuine, valid, and still in effect and that the decision-maker’s authority is genuine, valid, and still in effect. A person who is asked to accept a document shall do so within a reasonable amount of time. The person may not require an additional or different form of document for authority granted in the document presented. A person who refuses to accept a substitute document is subject to:  A court order mandating acceptance of the document; and Liability for reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred in an action or proceeding that mandates acceptance of the document. A person is not required to accept a substitute document under certain described conditions.

House

HB 15-1043 – Felony Offense For Repeat DUI Offenders
(Senators Cooke and Johnson & Representatives McCann and Saine)
Under current law, a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI is a misdemeanor offense. The bill makes such an offense a class 4 felony if the violation occurred: (1) After 3 or more prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof; or (2) not more than 7 years after the first of 2 prior convictions for DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI; vehicular homicide; vehicular assault; or any combination thereof, if the violation included at least one of the following circumstances: One or more persons less than 18 years of age were present in the person’s vehicle at the time of the violation;  In committing the violation, the person caused damage or injury to any property or persons;  After committing the violation, the person fled the scene; or At the time of the violation, or within 2 hours after the violation, the person’s BAC was 0.15 or higher. Under current law, aggravated driving with a revoked license is a class 6 felony. The bill changes the penalty to a class 1 misdemeanor but requires a sentencing court to ensure that an offender spends a minimum of 60 days in the custody of a county jail. Under current law, a person whose privilege to drive was revoked for multiple convictions for any combination of a DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI must hold an interlock-restricted license for at least one year following reinstatement prior to being eligible to obtain any other driver’s license. The bill expands this period to a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 5 years. The bill repeals provisions relating to the crime of aggravated driving with a revoked license when the offender also commits DUI, DUI per se, or DWAI as part of the same criminal episode. The bill makes conforming amendments.

HB 15-1161 – Public Accommodation First Amendment Rights
(Representative Klingenschmitt)
The bill specifies that neither the civil rights division, the civil rights commission, nor a court with jurisdiction to hear civil actions brought under the public accommodations laws may compel involuntary speech or acts of involuntary artistic expression or involuntary religious expression by a person when such speech or acts of artistic or religious expression would lead to that person directly or indirectly participating in, directly or indirectly supporting, or endorsing or impliedly endorsing an ideology, ceremony, creed, behavior, or practice with which the person does not agree.

HB 15-1189 – Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act
(Representative Keyser & Senator Steadman)
Colorado Commission on Uniform State Laws. The bill enacts the “Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act”, as amended, as Colorado law. The bill sets forth the conditions under which certain fiduciaries may access: The content of an electronic communication of a principal or decedent; A catalog of electronic communications sent or received by a decedent or principal; and  Any other digital asset in which a principal has a right or interest or in which a decedent had a right or interest at death. As to tangible personal property capable of receiving, storing, processing, or sending a digital asset, a fiduciary with authority over the property of a decedent, protected person, principal, or settlor may access the property and any digital asset stored in it and is an authorized user for purposes of computer fraud and unauthorized computer access laws.

“Fiduciary” means a personal representative, a conservator, an agent, or a trustee. A custodian and its officers, employees, and agents are immune from liability for an act or omission done in good-faith compliance with the provisions of the bill.

HB 15-1203 – Concerning earned time for certain offenders serving life sentences as habitual offenders
(Representative Rosenthal & Senator Steadman)
Under current law, an offender who was sentenced to a habitual offender 40-calendar-year life sentence before July 1, 1993, is not accruing earned time. The bill permits those sentenced under those circumstances to accrue earned time.

HB 15-1212 – Authority To Sell State Trust Lands To Local Gov
(Representative KC Becker & Senator Kerr)
In 2010, a law was enacted that allowed the state board of land commissioners (board) to convey land to units of local government if the conveyance would add value to adjoining or nearby state trust property, benefit board operations, or comply with local land use regulations. When enacted, the authority was set to repeal on July 1, 2015. The bill repeals that automatic repeal and makes the board’s authority permanent.

 

*a “Strike Below” amendment essentially replaces the entire bill below the title with an entirely different bill.  In practice this changes almost everything about the bill – but addresses the same topic, allowing for the sponsor to retain his/her bill and to continue working on the topic.  It is generally used when interested parties and stakeholders need a complete rewrite of the bill as originally introduced in ordrr to try and reach consensus.

 

Tenth Circuit: Plain Language of Regulation Requires Mortgage Subordination at Date of Conservation Easement Donation

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Mitchell v. Commissioner of Internal Revenue on Tuesday, January 6, 2015.

Ms. Mitchell and her late husband purchased property from Mr. Sheek subject an agreement to pay the balance to Mr. Sheek in yearly installments. In 2003, they granted a conservation easement on part of their property to the Montezuma Land Conservancy. At the time of the donation, the Mitchells did not obtain a mortgage subordination agreement from Mr. Sheek, but they did obtain one in 2005. The Mitchells claimed a charitable contribution deduction on their 2003 tax return.

In 2010, the Commissioner of the IRS mailed a notice of deficiency to Ms. Mitchell disallowing the charitable contribution for failure to meet certain Code requirements, specifically for not obtaining a mortgage subordination agreement at the time of the donation. Ms. Mitchell challenged the Commissioner’s determination in Tax Court, but the Tax Court denied the claimed charitable contribution, concluding the Code and its implementing regulations mandated that the mortgage be subordinated on the date of the donation. Ms. Mitchell appealed to the Tenth Circuit.

The Tenth Circuit first analyzed the applicable Code provisions, in particular noting the Code mandates that a contribution shall not be treated as exclusively for contribution purposes unless the contribution is protected in perpetuity. The Commissioner developed the mortgage subordination provision as a means to protect the conservation in perpetuity. The Tenth Circuit accordingly focused its inquiry on whether the regulations can be interpreted to entitle Ms. Mitchell to the deduction despite the undisputed fact that the mortgage was not subordinated on the date of the donation.

The Tenth Circuit first turned to Ms. Mitchell’s claim that, because the regulations are silent on the date of subordination, she is entitled to the deduction because the mortgage was eventually subordinated. The Tenth Circuit disagreed, finding the plain language of the regulation precluded her interpretation, and even if they were to view the regulation as ambiguous, they would defer to the Commissioner’s reasonable interpretation.

Ms. Mitchell next argues that strict compliance with the regulation was unnecessary because the risk of foreclosure was so remote as to be negligible, and because of a Deed provision that allegedly protected the property in perpetuity. The Tenth Circuit found that the plain language of the regulation required it to reject Ms. Mitchell’s arguments.

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the Tax Court’s decision.

2015 Probate Cost of Living Numbers Now Available

The Colorado Department of Revenue released the 2015 indexed amounts with cost of living adjustments as required by C.R.S. § 15-10-112. The cost of living adjustments affect the amount of share of intestate estate for surviving spouses, supplemental elective share, exempt property allowance, lump sum family allowance, and small estate limit. These numbers should be used for the estates of decedents dying in 2015.

2015 Probate COLA Numbers

Colorado Court of Appeals: Interlocutory Review Dismissed Because No Question of Law Involved

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Rich v. Ball Ranch Partnership on Thursday, January 29, 2015.

Contract—Question of Law—Interlocutory Appeal—CRCP 56(h)—CAR 4.2(b).

This case involves a dispute over operation of the Ball Ranch Partnership. Petitioners moved for a determination of a question of law pursuant to CRCP 56(h), asking the court to interpret a section of the partnership agreement.

CRS § 13-4-102.1(1) and CAR 4.2(b) authorize the Court of Appeals to allow “an interlocutory appeal of a certified question of law” in a civil case, if the lower court “certifies that immediate review may promote a more orderly disposition or establish a final disposition of the litigation” and “[t]he order involves a controlling and unresolved question of law.” Although the lower court certified this case for immediate review, a typical issue of contract interpretation, such as the issue in this case, is not such a question of law within the meaning of CRS § 13-4-102.1 and CAR 4.2. Because this case does not present any abstract or pure question of law underlying the district court’s interpretation of the contract, the petition was dismissed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

HB 15-1010: Creating Presumption of Notification to Beneficiaries by Trustee

On January 7, 2015, Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp and Dan Nordberg and Sen. Cheri Jahn introduced HB 15-1010 — Concerning a Presumption that a Trustee has Notified a Beneficiary when the Trustee has Adopted a Beneficiary Notification Procedure, and, in Connection Therewith, Clarifying that a Trustee May Deliver Information to Beneficiaries Electronically. This summary is published here courtesy of the Colorado Bar Association’s e-Legislative Report.

Current law requires a trustee to keep beneficiaries of a trust informed about the status of the trust. The bill creates a presumption that a beneficiary has received information or a statement of account when the trustee has procedures in place requiring the mailing or delivery of information or a statement of account to a beneficiary. The presumption applies to electronic notifications if the beneficiary has agreed to receive such electronic delivery or access and to a beneficiary’s receipt of a final account or statement.

The bill was assigned to the House Business Affairs and Labor Committee. The bill passed through the committee unamended and also survived Second and Third Reading in the House with no amendments.