May 19, 2019

Archives for April 23, 2010

Update: Ann Frick Named to Second Judicial District Court Bench

Governor Bill Ritter has appointed Denver lawyer Ann B. Frick to the Second Judicial District Court bench.

Of Frick’s appointment, Gov. Ritter remarked:

As a longtime leader in Colorado’s legal community, Ann will bring a diverse mix of experiences, skills and knowledge to the bench. Her recent experiences as an arbitrator and a mediator will serve her well as a district court judge, where I know she will treat everyone who appears in her courtroom fairly and respectfully.

Frick succeeds former Judge Larry E. Naves, who retired from the court earlier this month to join a local arbitration and mediation group. She began her legal career in 1978 as an associate with Holme Roberts & Owen, then served in the Denver District Attorney’s Office for several years before returning to private practice with Kelly, Haglund, Garnsey & Kahn. She has been a partner, specializing in business litigation, at Jacobs, Chase, Frick, Kleinkopf & Kelly since 1995.

Frick’s appointment to the Denver District Court is effective immediately.

Legislation: Ritter Creates Healthcare Reform Task Force

Taking initiative from the national healthcare reform enacted last month, Colorado Governor Bill Ritter issued an executive order calling for the formation of an interagency task force to implement the goals of the mandate.

The executive order also named Lorez Meinhold, Ritter’s health policy analyst, as director, in charge of facilitating and coordinating the efforts of the 10 state agencies involved with implementing the widespread changes to the healthcare system.

At the signing ceremony, held at the Wellington E. Webb Center For Primary Care in Denver, Gov. Ritter remarked:

Colorado has never waited for Washington on healthcare reform, and we aren’t about to start waiting now. Because of our efforts the past few years, Colorado is better positioned than most states to make the most of national reform. National reform allows us to accelerate and build on our work to provide higher quality care at lower costs to more Coloradans. Today marks a new chapter for healthcare in Colorado.

With his signature, Gov. Ritter also enacted four legislative bills related to healthcare:

HB 10-1004, “Concerning Standardization of Health Insurance Information Provided to Consumers”

HB 10-1166, “Concerning the Use of Plain Language in Insurance Policies”

HB 10-1138, “Concerning the Program to Repay Educational Loans of Healthcare Professionals”

SB 10-058, “Concerning the Eligibility Requirements for the Nursing Teacher Loan Forgiveness Pilot Program”

(image source: Colorado Office of the Governor)

Legislation: New Bill Establishes Veterans Treatment Court Program

Governor Bill Ritter signed a bill that enables the creation of treatment courts for combat veterans suffering from head injuries or mental disorders as a consequence of their warzone experiences.

HB 10-1104 offers an alternative to incarceration to combat veterans or members of the military who enter the criminal justice system for offenses involving drugs and alcohol that were used as self-medication for combat-related syndromes.

Over 1.6 million American men and women have served in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001, and of them, a significant number have or will “suffer, as a result of their military service, mental health injuries, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, depression, anxiety, and acute stress,” according to research cited in the bill.

The bill’s sponsors, Rep. Marsha Looper (R-El Paso) and Sen. Suzanne Williams (D-Arapahoe), proposed the legislation to augment the benefits the government extends to members of the military and veterans. According to the text of the bill, HB 10-1104 is a way to “honor the military service of our men and women by attempting to provide them with an alternative to incarceration when feasible, permitting them instead to access proper treatment for mental health and substance abuse problems resulting from military service.”

(image source: Wikimedia Commons)