August 21, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Tort Claims in Breach of Contract Action Barred by Economic Loss Rule

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Van Rees, Sr. v. Unleaded Software, Inc. on Thursday, December 5, 2013.

Negligence—Fraud—Fraudulent Concealment—Constructive Fraud—Negligent Misrepresentation—Colorado Consumer Protection Act—Civil Theft—Contract—Economic Loss Rule—Duty of Care.

Plaintiff John Van Rees, Sr. appealed the trial court’s dismissal of his claims against defendant Unleaded Software, Inc. (Unleaded). The judgment was affirmed.

Van Rees and Unleaded executed three contracts wherein Unleaded agreed to design and build a website, perform “search engine optimization” (SEO) services for the website, and host the website on a dedicated server. Van Rees brought this action due to the lack of work performed. Unleaded moved to dismiss the seven tort claims—all the claims except the three breach-of-contract claims—as barred by the “economic loss rule,” which the court granted.

Van Rees contended that the trial court erred in dismissing his claims without sufficient written analysis. A trial court, however, need not make findings of fact and conclusions of law when it dismisses a complaint for failure to state a claim under CRCP 12(b)(5).

Van Rees argued that the trial court erred in dismissing his claims of fraud, fraudulent concealment, constructive fraud, and negligent misrepresentation because he alleged duties independent of the three contracts. Here, all alleged misrepresentations related directly to contractual duties. Because Van Rees failed to allege any independent duty on which to base his tort claims, the trial court did not err in dismissing those four claims.

Van Rees also contended that the trial court erred when it dismissed his negligence claim. Van Rees, however, failed to allege that Unleaded owed him a duty of care independent of its contractual duties.

Van Rees further argued that the trial court erred in dismissing his claim under the Colorado Consumer Protection Act (CCPA). This dispute pertains to a private contract between two sophisticated business entities, and Van Rees does not allege any harm or potential harm to identifiable segments of the public. Therefore, Van Rees failed to allege sufficient facts to support a CCPA claim.

Finally, Van Rees contended that the trial court erred in dismissing his civil theft claim. Van Rees’s civil theft claim fails, however, because it arises out of the alleged breaches of contract, and nothing in the complaint could be construed to establish an independent legal duty.

Summary and full case available here.

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