May 22, 2019

Tenth Circuit: In Consolidated Bankruptcy Appeal, One Case is Moot, Court Lacks Jurisdiction to Hear Other

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals published its opinion in Gordon v. Bank of America and Pahs v. Kiehl on Thursday, February 20, 2014.

After Pahs filed his appeal with this court, he and the Chapter 13 trustee agreed that Pahs would continue to make the payments required by the Chapter 13 plan while this appeal was pending. When Pahs failed to make those payments, one of his creditors moved for the dismissal of Pahs’ bankruptcy. After no one objected to the motion, the bankruptcy court granted it, dismissing Pahs’ bankruptcy. In light of that dismissal, the Tenth Circuit held it could no longer grant Pahs any relief and his appeal was therefore moot.

Regarding the Gordons’ appeal, The Tenth Circuit held it had no jurisdiction because it was not taken from a final appealable decision and the parties had not invoked any mechanism that might permit an interlocutory appeal.

Although the district court’s decision required the Gordons to use the model Chapter 13 plan without modification, they would be free to revise the substantive portion of their plan. And the bankruptcy court will have to give creditors notice of the new amended plan, permit time for any objections, and then conduct another confirmation hearing. All of which is to say, the district court remanded the Gordons’ case to the bankruptcy court for significant further proceedings. This did not constitute a final appealable decision, and the Tenth Circuit lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

The Pahs’ appeal was DISMISSED as moot.

The Gordons’ appeal was DISMISSED for lack of jurisdiction.

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