June 18, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Treasurer Did Not Undertake Diligent Inquiry as to Actual Residence for Notice

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Cordell v. Klingsheim on Thursday, October 9, 2014.

Tax Lien—Deed—Treasurer—Diligent Inquiry—Notice—Jurisdictional.

Plaintiffs Carl and Wanda Cordell were record owners of a tract of land in La Plata County (Tract 1). Carl Cordell was also the record owner of an adjoining tract (Tract 2). The Cordells failed to pay the taxes owed on the properties, and Brenda Heller purchased the tax liens on the properties. Heller assigned the tax liens to Klingsheim, who later requested and received deeds from the La Plata County Treasurer to the two properties after the Treasurer sent notice to the Cordells. Upon learning of the Treasurer’s deeds, the Cordells filed the present action seeking, as relevant here, a declaratory judgment that the Treasurer’s deeds are void, which the trial court granted.

On appeal, Klingsheim contended that the trial court erred in concluding that the Treasurer had failed to undertake diligent inquiry in attempting to determine Carl’s and Wanda’s residences. The Treasurer sent the notices, by certified mail, to 705 N. Vine, Farmington, New Mexico, which was the address listed for them in the county tax rolls. The return receipts from the mailings, however, indicated that the notices were not delivered to plaintiffs, nor were they delivered to 705 N. Vine. Rather, the receipts indicated that the notices were delivered to Cleo Cordell at 703 N. Vine, and the box for “agent” on the return receipts had not been checked. Despite this discrepancy, the Treasurer conducted no further inquiry to determine whether 705 N. Vine was indeed plaintiffs’ residence.

Such inaction after learning that the notices were not delivered either to plaintiffs or to a person claiming to be their agent does not constitute “diligent inquiry” in attempting to determine their residences. Because a treasurer’s “full compliance” with the requirements of CRS §39-11-128 is jurisdictional, the trial court properly set aside the deeds as void.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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