March 20, 2019

Archives for November 14, 2014

2014 Colorado Assembly of Lawyers and New Attorneys Sworn in at Fall Admissions Ceremony

groupoathMany of the 632 new attorneys who passed the Colorado bar exam in July of this year were admitted to practice law in Colorado on Monday, November 3, 2014, at the Boettcher Concert Hall in Denver. Preceding the admittance ceremony was the 2014 Colorado Assembly of Lawyers. The annual assembly culminates October’s Legal Professionalism Month, during which members of the Colorado legal profession rededicate themselves to the highest standard of professionalism and integrity. This year’s assembly featured a panel discussion about professionalism in the 21st century. Following the assembly, the new attorneys took the Oath of Admission, and were welcomed to practice by Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Nancy Rice, U.S. District Court Chief Judge Marcia Krieger, and CBA President Charley Garcia. The keynote address was given by former Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Michael Bender.

The University of Colorado, University of Denver, and the Colorado Bar Association Young Lawyers Division all held receptions immediately following the fall admission ceremony. CU’s reception for their alumni was held at Kevin Taylor’s at the Opera House and DU’s reception for their alumni was held at Rock Bottom Brewery. For the first time, CBA YLD held a reception for those just sworn into practice from out of state schools. The CBA YLD reception was held at Pizza Republica where more than 50 new attorneys and their family enjoyed drinks and appetizers.  

Tenth Circuit: Plaintiff Denied Due Process When Not Allowed Hearing on Allegations of Sexual Harassment

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in McDonald v. Wise on Tuesday, October 28, 2014.

Wayne McDonald was a Special Assistant to Denver Mayor Michael Hancock in 2011 and 2012. He was appointed by the mayor to serve “at the pleasure of the Special Assistant,” and in his official duties, he worked closely with Denver police officer Leslie Wise, who provided security to the mayor. He communicated with Ms. Wise on and off duty, discussing both work-related and personal matters. Between September 2011 and March 2012, Ms. Wise called Mr. McDonald at least 41 times on his personal phone, with calls as early as 6:26 a.m. and as late as 7:39 p.m. On November 3, 2011, unbeknownst to Mr. McDonald, Ms. Wise recorded two of these calls. At least 3/4 of the calls from Ms. Wise to Mr. McDonald occurred after November 3, 2011. She also gave him a Christmas gift, attended church with him, and met his family. They last spoke on March 14, 2012, when Ms. Wise telephoned Mr. McDonald.

On May 18, 2012, the mayor’s deputy chief of staff and the city attorney informed Mr. McDonald that Ms. Wise had accused him of sexual harassment and produced the two recorded phone calls from November 3, 2011. Mr. McDonald denied the allegations and agreed to participate fully in an investigation. He left the meeting with the understanding that he was suspended pending the outcome of an investigation and hearing. At a subsequent meeting on May 21, Mr. McDonald was told he could either resign or be fired due to the allegations. Mr. McDonald requested an investigation and opportunity to defend himself, but was fired on the spot. The mayor and his staff subsequently informed the news media that Mr. McDonald was fired for sexual harassment. Mr. McDonald applied for unemployment compensation benefits, but was denied based on his termination for sexual harassment. He appealed to the Colorado Department of Labor, and the hearing officer determined Mr. McDonald was not responsible for the separation from employment. Mr. McDonald has not been able to find subsequent employment, and has been told by potential employers that his termination for sexual harassment is the reason. He brought suit against the city, the mayor, and the mayor’s press secretary for due process violations, breach of contract, and unlawful disclosure of confidential information. He sued Ms. Wise for defamation. The district court rejected all of his claims, and this appeal followed.

The Tenth Circuit first addressed Mr. McDonald’s claims that he was deprived due process of the law for both property and liberty interests. The Tenth Circuit found that Mr. McDonald did not have a property interest in his continued employment, because he served at the pleasure of the mayor and as such was an at-will employee. He could not have had a property interest in continued employment because of his at-will status, and the district court correctly dismissed this claim. The Tenth Circuit reached a different outcome as to Mr. McDonald’s liberty interest in his good name and continued employment. The mayor said at a press conference that Mr. McDonald was terminated for sexual harassment, not because of allegations, thus effectively affirming the allegations in a public forum. The statements called Mr. McDonald’s good name into question, and Mr. McDonald has been unable to secure further employment due to the statements. The Tenth Circuit determined that Mr. McDonald’s liberty interest was infringed upon, and next turned to the question of whether he had a chance to clear his name at a proper name-clearing hearing. Because Mr. McDonald received no hearing at all on this issue, the Tenth Circuit found a serious deprivation of due process related to his protected liberty interest, and reversed the district court. However, the Tenth Circuit found that the mayor’s press secretary need not be named in her official capacity in the suit, since the mayor and the city were named. On remand, the proper parties for this issue are solely the mayor and the city.

Mr. McDonald also contended that his termination was a breach of his employment contract with the city. The Tenth Circuit disagreed, finding as above that his employment was at will, and his claim is not one for which relief can be granted. The Tenth Circuit likewise disposed of his claim regarding non-disclosure of personnel records under the Colorado Open Records Act, because there is no private right of action under CORA and he did not allege sufficient reason to amend his complaint.

Finally, the Tenth Circuit turned to Mr. McDonald’s defamation claim against Ms. Wise. The district court dismissed his defamation claim, finding qualified immunity for Ms. Wise, and that even if she were not immune, Mr. McDonald failed to allege a viable defamation claim. The Tenth Circuit disagreed with the trial court’s reasoning, finding instead that Ms. Wise was not entitled to qualified immunity since her actions were willful and wanton. Mr. McDonald’s complaint alleged sufficient facts to support an inference of willful and wanton conduct, including the numerous phone calls made to him by Ms. Wise after the date of the alleged sexual harassment, and he was entitled to a trial on the merits. As to the defamation claim, the Tenth Circuit found that Ms. Wise held no qualified privilege since she made the allegedly defamatory statements with actual malice, and the district court erred by concluding Ms. Wise was immune from liability.

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal of Mr. McDonald’s property interest due process claim, breach of employment contract claim, and CORA violation claim. The Tenth Circuit reversed the district court’s dismissal of Mr. McDonald’s liberty interest due process claim and defamation claim against Ms. Wise, and remanded for further proceedings.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Announcement Sheet, 11/13/2014

On Thursday, November 13, 2014, the Colorado Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and 38 unpublished opinions.

Neither State Judicial nor the Colorado Bar Association provides case summaries for unpublished appellate opinions. The case announcement sheet is available here.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 11/13/2014

On Thursday, November 13, 2014, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued three published opinions and two unpublished opinions.

Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. Insulvail, LLC

Kechi Township v. Freightliner, LLC

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.