June 17, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: All Separations from Base Period Employers Must Be Evaluated to Determine Unemployment Eligibility

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Nagl v. Industrial Claim Appeals Office on Thursday, April 23, 2015.

Unemployment Compensation—CRS § 8-73-108(5)(e)(IV)—Constitutional Right to Travel.

Claimant worked as a front desk agent for Destination Vail Hotel, Inc. He quit this job to be located closer to his girlfriend in Telluride. Claimant found a new position in Telluride, but was subsequently laid off.

Claimant then sought unemployment insurance benefits. A deputy for the division of unemployment insurance denied claimant’s request for benefits based on his employment with Destination Vail Hotel. However, claimant did receive benefits based on his work for his Telluride employer. Claimant appealed, and the hearing officer affirmed the deputy’s decision. The Industrial Claim Appeals Office (Panel) affirmed.

On appeal, claimant contended that the Panel’s decision was inconsistent with the express purpose of the Colorado Employment Security Act (CESA), which is to provide unemployment benefits to persons who are unemployed through no fault of their own. Whether a claimant is entitled to unemployment benefits attributable to wages paid by a particular employer depends on the reason for the separation from that employment. Because it was undisputed that claimant voluntarily quit his employment with Destination Vail Hotel, and thus was at fault for that separation, the hearing officer and the Panel did not err in determining that he was disqualified from receiving benefits from that employer.

Claimant also argued that the move to Telluride was not a disqualifying event under CRS § 8-73-108(4)(n). However, the hearing officer properly limited the proceeding to the circumstances surrounding his Vail job, not his subsequent employer. The fact that he accepted work after leaving the Vail job does not bear on whether he refused to accept work following the termination of his Telluride job. Thus, CRS § 8-73-108(4)(n) does not provide a basis for awarding benefits to claimant based on his employment with Destination Vail Hotel.

Claimant further argued that the hearing officer’s application of CESA violated his right to travel, as protected by the Colorado Constitution, because it effectively penalized his right to move within the state. To succeed on an “as applied” challenge, a party must show that the statute is unconstitutional under the circumstances in which the party acted. Here, the loss of benefits resulting from claimant’s decision to quit his job to move closer to his girlfriend is not a constitutionally significant restriction. The order was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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