April 22, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Picture of Accused in Photo Lineup Must Match Victim’s Initial Description

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Singley on Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Due Process—Out-of-Court Identification—Photo Lineup—Jury Instructions—Witness Credibility—Subpoena—Testimony—Cumulative.

The victim, J.A.C., was commuting home from work when two men, both carrying handguns, confronted him. When J.A.C. shouted for help, one of the men opened fire, shooting him three times, fracturing his pelvic bone, and causing permanent scarring. Singling and another man were arrested later that evening after robbing another woman. J.A.C. identified Singley as the shooter in a photo lineup. A jury found Singley guilty of attempted second-degree murder, first-degree assault, attempted aggravated, robbery, and felony menacing.

On appeal, Singley contended that the trial court violated his right to due process and a fair trial when it declined to suppress the allegedly impermissibly suggestive and unreliable out-of-court identification, as well as the subsequent in-court identification. Immediately after the shooting, J.A.C. told officers that the shooter was in his 20s with a medium-length Afro. Several days later, the police presented J.A.C. with a photographic lineup built around Singley, which showed six bald men, all of whom appear to be of the same general age as Singley, who was 46. Because the picture of Singley did not match the initial description given by the witness, the trial court erred when it found that the lineup was not impermissibly suggestive. Under the totality of the circumstances, including J.A.C.’s view of the witness at the crime scene and only taking forty-five seconds to identify Singley in the photo lineup, J.A.C.’s identifications of Singley were nonetheless reliable.

Singley contended that the trial court abused its discretion when it refused to give four proposed jury instructions on the reliability of eyewitness identification testimony. The court gave the jury a pattern witness credibility instruction, accurately informing it of the applicable law. Therefore, the trial court did not abuse its discretion when it refused to give Singley’s four additional instructions.

Singley contended that the trial court abused its discretion and violated his right to present a complete defense when it quashed his subpoena of the Aurora police chief. Specifically, he asserted that the court improperly precluded the police chief’s testimony regarding his assistance in helping J.A.C. obtain a U-Visa, which allowed him to reside and work legally in the United States. Singley cross-examined J.A.C. regarding receipt of this U-Visa in exchange for his cooperation in the investigation to establish his motive for testifying and bias. Singley’s counsel also questioned the officer who helped J.A.C. with the U-Visa application. Therefore, the testimony of the Aurora police chief was cumulative and irrelevant, and the trial court did not abuse its discretion when it quashed the subpoena. The judgment was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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