July 17, 2019

Archives for July 24, 2015

Business Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (Drones) Expanding Exponentially

DroneDrones, also known as Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) or Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles (UAV), are not just for hobbyists anymore. Drones are devices that are used for flight in the air without an onboard pilot. Drones can be small and simple, such as remote-controlled aircraft popularized by hobbyists, or large and complex, like the surveillance aircraft used by the military in hostile areas. The military has been using drones for many years to conduct surveillance and deliver weapons in dangerous war zones. However, in the last several years, civilian and business use of drones has increased dramatically.

Non-military drone use is categorized into public aircraft operations and civil operations. Public aircraft operations are uses by public agencies or organizations of a particular aircraft for a particular purpose in a particular area. Public operation uses can include law enforcement, firefighting, border patrol, disaster relief, search and rescue, and military training. Civil operations are any operations that do not meet the statutory criteria for public aircraft operations, including business uses such as for agricultural purposes, construction, security, TV and movie industry uses, environmental monitoring, insurance, aerial photography, news media, and much more.

Because they utilize airspace for their operations, drones are regulated by the FAA. In 2013, the FAA issued a comprehensive plan for the safe integration of civil unmanned aircraft systems into the country’s airspace. In early 2015, the FAA issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for small UAS. The goal of the proposed rules is to provide a framework of regulations to allow routine use of certain small UAS while maintaining flexibility to accommodate future changes in technology. The public comment period for the proposed rules ended April 24, 2015.

Businesses wishing to utilize drones must obtain a Section 333 Exemption from the FAA. Petitions for Section 333 Exemption must be filed with and approved by the FAA before the drone may be used for business purposes. The FAA can also grant businesses the right to use airspace via Special Airworthiness Certificates. Special Airworthiness Certificates are available for research and development or experimental aircraft.

Attorney Thomas Dougherty, II, head of Lewis Roca Rothgerber’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Industry Team, will discuss drone law at CLE on July 28, 2015. Topics to be explored include potential drone uses, FAA regulations covering drones, required information for petitions for Section 333 Exemption, Certificates of Waiver or Authorization, the FAA’s enforcement authority, and legal issues arising out of state and local laws for the use of drones. Register now by clicking the links below or calling (303) 860-0608.

CLE Program: Drones for Lawyers: The Do’s and Don’ts for Clients

This CLE presentation will take place Tuesday, July 28, 2015 at the CLE offices. Click here to register for the live program or click here to register for the webcast.

Can’t make the live program? Order the homestudy here – Video OnDemand – MP3

 

Colorado Court of Appeals: Maintenance Awards Exempt from Attorney Charging Liens

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Marriage of Dixon v. Samuel J. Stoorman & Associates PC on Thursday, July 16, 2015.

Charging Lien—Maintenance—Attorney Fees.

Samuel J. Stoorman & Associates PC (law firm) sought to enforce its lien against the maintenance payments that husband was obligated to pay to the law firm’s former client (wife). The law firm had represented wife in the dissolution action giving rise to husband’s maintenance obligation. The trial court determined that the maintenance payments were exempt from enforcement of the attorney’s lien.

On appeal, the law firm contended that the trial court erred in finding that the law firm’s attorney’s lien could not be enforced against husband’s spousal maintenance obligations. A charging lien automatically attaches to the fruits of the attorney’s representation of the client, to the extent of the attorney’s reasonable fees remaining due and unpaid. An attorney may immediately enforce the lien against the client once judgment in favor of the client is entered. Maintenance payments and obligations are exempt from enforcement of the charging lien. Accordingly, an attorney’s charging lien may not be enforced against a court-ordered spousal maintenance obligation or payment. The trial court’s denial of the law firm’s motion to enforce the lien against husband’s maintenance obligations to wife was affirmed. Nevertheless, the law firm’s position did not lack substantial justification because the question whether a charging lien may be enforced against spousal maintenance payments or obligations had not been decided at the time of the law firm’s motion. Consequently, the award of attorney fees and costs to husband was reversed and husband’s request for an award of attorney fees and costs incurred on appeal was denied.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Seller in Installment Land Contract Not Landowner Under Premises Liability Act

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Lucero v. Ulvestad on Thursday, July 16, 2015.

Installment Land Contract—Landowner—Colorado Premises Liability Act—Trespasser—Injuries—Negligence.

This case arose from 15-year-old Lucero’s unsupervised use of a steam room in a home purchased by Landers from Ulvestad. The installment land contract provided Landers immediate possession of the property, but record title would remain in Ulvestad’s name until Landers paid the entire purchase price. With permission from Landers, Lucero entered the steam room and suffered a seizure rendering her unconscious. Before she was found, Lucero suffered severe burns to her face, head, and arm. Lucero brought this lawsuit against both Landers and Ulvestad. The trial court found that Ulvestad owed Lucero no common law duty of care and dismissed her negligence claim. The jury returned a verdict in favor of Ulvestad on Lucero’s claim under the Colorado Premises Liability Act (Act).

Lucero appealed the trial court’s determination that she was a trespasser on the property at the time she was injured. Based on the plain language of the installment land contract, Ulvestad, on the date possession of the property was transferred to Landers, was no longer a person “in possession of real property” or “legally responsible for the condition of real property.” Therefore, because Ulvestad was not a landowner under the Act, the trial court should have granted Ulvestad’s motion for a directed verdict. Therefore, Lucero was not harmed by the trespasser determination, and the judgment against Lucero was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Red Rocks’ Creation Rock is Natural Condition of Unimproved Property

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Ackerman v. City & County of Denver on Thursday, July 16, 2015.

Personal Injury—Colorado Governmental Immunity Act—Waiver—Unimproved Property.

Plaintiffs filed this personal injury action after being struck and injured by rocks that fell from “Creation Rock,” a rock formation that abuts one side of the Red Rocks Park amphitheater, while attending a concert. The City and County of Denver (Denver) brought this interlocutory appeal after the trial court determined that Denver’s immunity from suit had been waived.

On appeal, Denver argued that the trial court erred in finding it had waived its immunity under the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act (CGIA). Creation Rock is a natural sandstone monolith that rises 300 feet and extends the entire length of the amphitheater on the north side. Therefore, Creation Rock is a natural condition of unimproved property. Denver’s voluntary efforts to protect the public from a natural condition does not render the government liable for injuries that occur when those efforts are inadequate. Further, plaintiffs’ location in the amphitheater does not support a waiver of immunity under CRS § 24-10-106(1)(e) for injuries caused by a natural condition. The order was reversed and the case was remanded with directions to dismiss plaintiffs’ claims against Denver for lack of subject matter jurisdiction under the CGIA and to award Denver its attorney fees.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 7/23/2015

On Thursday, July 23, 2015, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued no published opinion and three unpublished opinions.

Salinas v. New Mexico State Police Department

Arden v. McIntosh

Quarrie v. New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.