December 18, 2018

Archives for August 7, 2015

Tenth Circuit: Concealment of Arbitration Agreements Until Late Stage of Litigation Constituted Waiver of Right to Arbitrate

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in In re Cox Enterprises, Inc.: Healy v. Cox Communications, Inc. on Wednesday, June 24, 2015.

Cox is a cable provider involved in class-action litigation brought by subscribers to its cable service. In 2009, subscribers in several jurisdictions filed suits against Cox, alleging the company illegally tied provision of its cable service to rental of a set-top box. The actions were consolidated in a multi-district litigation and transferred to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma. Cox moved to dismiss, and during the pendency of its motion began inserting mandatory arbitration clauses into contracts with many of its customers, including class members. Cox does not appear to have notified the District Court about its insertion of the clauses. Plaintiffs’ efforts to certify a nationwide class failed, and instead they sought to certify several classes for geographic regions. These actions were again consolidated and transferred to the Western District of Oklahoma.

The instant case was originally brought in April 2012, and Cox unsuccessfully moved to dismiss in September 2012. The parties then engaged in substantial discovery, and named plaintiff Healy moved to certify a class in September 2013. Cox at no time mentioned the arbitration clauses. The court granted class certification in January 2014 as the parties continued to engage in discovery. Cox appealed to the Tenth Circuit in March 2014, again failing to mention the arbitration clauses, but its petition was denied. In April 2014, Cox moved for summary judgment, and that same day it moved to compel arbitration against both the absent class and named plaintiff Healy, citing the arbitration clauses for the first time. It later clarified that it was not compelling arbitration against Healy. The district court denied the motion to compel on the basis that Cox’s prior conduct in the litigation constituted waiver. Cox appealed.

The Tenth Circuit used its six-factor Peterson test to evaluate whether the right to arbitration had been waived. The six factors are (1) whether the party’s actions are inconsistent with the right to arbitrate, (2) whether the parties were well into the preparation of a lawsuit before a party notified the opposing party of an intent to arbitrate, (3) whether a party requested arbitration enforcement close to a trial date or delayed for a long period before seeking a stay, (4) whether a defendant seeking arbitration filed a counterclaim without requesting a stay, (5) whether important intervening steps like discovery had taken place, and (6) whether the delay affected, misled, or prejudiced the opposing party.

The district court determined Cox’s failure to inform it of the presence of arbitration agreements until after class certification was inconsistent with an intent to arbitrate and suggested an attempt to manipulate the process, as it would affect the numerosity of the class. The Tenth Circuit agreed, also finding that because Cox did not request for its motion for summary judgment to be stayed pending arbitration implied an attempt to “play heads I win, tails you lose” by manipulating the litigation machinery. The district court found, and the Tenth Circuit agreed, that the second, third, and fifth Peterson factors also cut strongly against Cox. Cox did not invoke the arbitration agreements until two years after the lawsuit was commenced, and substantial discovery had occurred before the invocation. Further, Cox failed to mention a factor that would have significantly affected the district court’s Rule 23 analysis, and Healy would be significantly prejudiced if arbitration were allowed. The Tenth Circuit opined that perhaps the greatest prejudice would be to the integrity of the judicial process, since both the district court and Tenth Circuit had invested significant time and energy in analyzing literally thousands of pages of documents.

Cox argued the Peterson factors were inapplicable because a party does not invariably waive its right to impose arbitration by filing its motion to compel after class certification. The district court rejected this argument as an improper attempt to artificially narrow the scope of the waiver, and the Tenth Circuit agreed. Cox could have asserted its right to arbitration at many earlier litigation stages but chose to conceal the arbitration provisions. Further, the district court’s denial of the motion to compel was based not on Cox’s failure to compel arbitration earlier but rather its specific conduct evincing an attempt to “take multiple bites of the apple.”

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court.

Tenth Circuit: Waiver of 11th Amendment Immunity Applies to All Divisions of State Department of Labor

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Arbogast v. State of Kansas Department of Labor on Friday, June 19, 2015.

Kathleen Arbogast worked for the Kansas Department of Labor (KDOL) in the Workers’ Compensation Division and suffers from asthma. She complained that her co-workers’ perfumes were triggering asthma attacks, so the Division moved her to an office in the basement in September 2010, but she continued to have asthma attacks when co-workers would visit her office. In August 2011, Ms. Arbogast was terminated by her supervisor, Karin Brownlee. Ms. Arbogast filed suit in January 2013, asserting claims of discrimination and retaliation in violation of the Rehabilitation Act, and named as defendants KDOL and Brownlee in her individual capacity. KDOL sought to dismiss the Rehabilitation Act claims, arguing KDOL lacks the capacity to sue or be sued and Kansas has not waived its judicial immunity under the Eleventh Amendment. The district court denied KDOL’s motion to dismiss and KDOL brought an interlocutory appeal.

The Tenth Circuit first examined its appellate jurisdiction to consider KDOL’s claim that it lacked capacity to be sued. KDOL argued that under state law, as a mere agency of the state, it lacked capacity to sue or be sued, and the collateral order doctrine conferred immediate jurisdiction on the Tenth Circuit to hear the issue. However, at oral argument, KDOL’s counsel conceded that the collateral order doctrine may not permit interlocutory review of the capacity argument. The Tenth Circuit agreed with the concession. Citing three requirements to invoke jurisdiction under the collateral order doctrine, i.e., (1) the district court’s order conclusively resolved the disputed issue, (2) the order resolved an issue separate from the merits of the case, and (3) the order is effectively unreviewable on order from final judgment, the Tenth Circuit found KDOL’s argument failed at the first prong because the district court did not conclusively determine KDOL’s capacity to sue or be sued. The Tenth Circuit dismissed the issue on appeal.

Next, the Tenth Circuit evaluated whether KDOL waived Eleventh Amendment immunity by accepting funds for the Unemployment Insurance Division housed within the Department of Labor. KDOL contended that because Ms. Arbogast worked for the Workers’ Compensation Division, not the Unemployment Insurance Division, there was no waiver of immunity. Looking at the Rehabilitation Act, the Tenth Circuit found the plain language included in the waiver of immunity “all the operations of . . . a department . . . of a State.” Since the Workers’ Compensation Division and Unemployment Insurance Division were both housed in the Kansas Department of Labor, the acceptance of funds for the Unemployment Insurance Division constituted a waiver of Eleventh Amendment immunity for the entire Department of Labor. Kansas argued that extending the waiver of immunity to the Workers’ Compensation Division when it received no federal funds would violate the Spending Clause of the U.S. Constitution. The Tenth Circuit found the first Dole factor was satisfied because allowing those who suffer discrimination to bring private causes of action is “reasonably calculated” to achieve Congress’s goal of combating discrimination. KDOL also argued it did not have notice of its waiver, but the Tenth Circuit disagreed, finding the plain language of the Rehabilitation Act provided sufficient notice that the waiver extended to all the operations of the department. KDOL also argued that the waiver of immunity is unrelated to the federal interest justifying expenditure of the funds, but the Tenth Circuit again disagreed, finding that Congress’s intent to eliminate discrimination based on disability was reasonably related to its distribution of federal funds.

The Tenth Circuit dismissed due to lack of jurisdiction KDOL’s argument that it lacked capacity to be sued. The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s finding of a waiver of Eleventh Amendment immunity.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 8/6/2015

On Thursday, August 6, 2015, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued one published opinion and three unpublished opinions.

Bird v. Regents of New Mexico State University

Casanova v. Ulibarri

Pruitt v. Heimgartner

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.