April 20, 2019

Archives for August 19, 2015

10 iPad Apps for Use in the Office and the Courtroom

PrintThink of the first courtroom you were ever in. Was there a flip chart? An easel? A projector and slides? Or was there a sophisticated plasma TV screen and electronic system so attorneys could showcase their best evidence through their tablets? That last example may not have appeared in your first courtroom, but it certainly is becoming a common sight today.

Attorney Jason Márquez of Johnson Márquez Legal Group uses an iPad in every courtroom presentation where the judge allows it. Using apps like Adobe, Evernote, and Pocket Scan, he can create a compelling courtroom presentation to highlight favorable evidence while minimizing costs associated with photocopying and creating exhibit notebooks. Márquez believes so strongly in using iPads in his practice that he provides them to every member of his firm. He uses several apps, but suggests these ten apps as must-haves for office use and courtroom presentations:

  1. Adobe Acrobat® is multi-platform, PDF solution that allows you to work with all kinds of documents to: View, Create, Manipulate, Print, Combine files.
  2. GoodReader® is the super-robust PDF reader for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch. Sync with Dropbox, OneDrive, any FTP or SFTP server. Sync entire folders or individual files separately.
  3. DropBox® is a folder on your computer that synchronizes your files online and across computers. Any files you place within it will be available on your other computers with Dropbox, as well as the web.
  4. Evernote® is designed for note-taking and archiving. A “note” can be a piece of formatted text, a full webpage or webpage excerpt, a photograph, a voice memo, or a handwritten “ink” note. Notes can also have file attachments.
  5. Pocket Cloud® is a secure and fast way to remotely connect to your Mac or Windows desktop with your iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, or Android device no matter where you are. Access your files, pictures, and applications like Excel, Powerpoint, Photoshop, games or any other program.
  6. Tiny Scan® turns your iPhone/iPad into a portable scanner. Scans are saved to your phone as images or PDFs. Name and organize your scans into folders, or share them by: Email, Dropbox, Evernote, DropBox, Wi-Fi to your computer, Fax (using TinyFax).
  7. Dragon® Dictation is an easy-to-use voice recognition application powered by Dragon® NaturallySpeaking® that allows you to easily speak and instantly see your text or email messages. In fact, it’s up to five (5) times faster than typing on the keyboard.
  8. Prezi® is a presentation tool that can be used as an alternative to traditional slide making programs such as PowerPoint or Keynote. Instead of slides, Prezi makes use of one large canvas that allows you to pan and zoom to various parts of the canvas and emphasize the ideas presented there.
  9. Casemaker® is an alternative legal research tool to LexisNexis and Westlaw. It allows users to search and browse a variety of legal information such as statutes, regulations, and case law on the Web. Casemaker comes free with your CBA membership!
  10. JuryPad® assists with voir dire in different jurisdictions. Create custom seating charts for any courtroom. Add or modify a juror’s information including age, occupation, education, prior jury service, and much more.

Márquez will present on “The iPad Advantage” at the 2015 Colorado Legal & Technology Expo on Friday, August 21, 2015 at the Warwick Hotel in downtown Denver. Entrance to the Expo is free, and Márquez’s CLE program is only $19 for CBA members. Join us at the Warwick on Friday and learn how you can increase your productivity—and your bottom line.

2015 Colorado Legal & Technology Expo

The 2015 Colorado Legal & Technology Expo will take place on Friday, August 21, 2015 at the Warwick Hotel in Denver. Entrance to the Expo is free. Each 50-minute CLE program is $19 for CBA members and $39 for non-CBA members. Register for the event and find more information here.

Comment Period Open for Proposed Changes to 10th Circuit Local Rules

On August 14, 2015, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals announced that changes to its local rules will take effect January 1, 2016. From August 14, 2015 to October 22, 2015, all interested parties are encouraged to review the changes and make comments to the clerk of the court. The changes are outlined in a memorandum explaining the proposals, and are excerpted here:

10th Cir. R. 8.3(A) (addressing applications for stay made to a single judge) This proposed change removes the language at the end of the current rule which states applications for stay made to single judges are disfavored “except in an emergency.” Given technical advancements, all emergency motions can be processed centrally.

10th Cir. R. 9.1(C) (regarding application of the Rule 46.3(B) motion requirement to bail appeals) This proposed change modifies the rule to make clear that the new motion practice announced in R. 46.3(B) does not apply to bail appeals.

10th Cir. R. 17.3 (regarding filing an appendix in agency cases) This proposed change modifies the rule to make clear that when an agency record is filed, the parties need not submit a separate appendix.

10th Cir. R. 25.6 (addressing CM technical failures) This new rule addresses procedures in the event of a CM/ECF system failure.

10th Cir. R. 27.1 (location of the “confer and consent” provision of the local rule on motions) The court’s “confer and consent” rule has been moved to the beginning of local rule 27 for greater visibility. In addition, the rule now makes clear that CJA counsel need not confer on motions filed to withdraw or for continued appointment.

10th Cir. R. 30.1(D)(6) (addressing motions to seal documents) This local rule addresses the submission of sealed materials. The proposed change to the rule requires parties submitting materials under seal (except for presentence reports, which are exempt) to file a motion to do so. The proposed change is made in accord with circuit case law emphasizing the presumption in favor of providing access to judicial records. See Eugene S. v. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, 663 F.3d 1124, 1135-1136 (10th Cir. 2011).

10th Cir. R. 31.5 (addressing the number of hard copies required for briefs) This modification adds a specific clause regarding the court’s already existing requirement that 7 hard copies of briefs must be received in the clerk’s office within 2 business days of the electronic filing.

10th Cir. R. 33.2 (removal of the requirement to have a private settlement discussion) This modification deletes this local rule.

10th Cir. R. 46.3(B) and R. 46.4(B)(1) (incorporating the new motion requirement from the amended CJA Plan adopted effective July 8, 2015) This proposal includes a section memorializing the new motion requirement created by virtue of the court’s amendment of the circuit Criminal Justice Act Plan in July 2015. In addition, please note the language added to Rule 46.4(B)(1), which makes clear the new requirement is not a substitute for filing a motion to withdraw, as appropriate, in Anders cases. In addition, the court’s decision in United States v. Cervantes, ___F.3d___, 2015 WL 4636640 (10th Cir. May 22, 2015) has been incorporated into the rule. Finally, Addendum I of the rules, which is a copy of the CJA Plan, has been updated.

Addendum IV (removal of the Rules for Judicial Misconduct and Judicial Disability Proceedings) Because they are now available on the court’s website, the Rules on Judicial Misconduct have been deleted as an attachment to the Rules.

The Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure will not be updated January 1, 2016. A redline of the Tenth Circuit Local Rules including the proposed changes is available here.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Refusal to Bake Cake Because of Opposition to Same-Sex Marriage Discriminatory

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Craig v. Masterpiece Cakeshop, Inc. on Thursday, August 13, 2015.

Public Accommodations Law—Same-Sex Marriage—Freedom of Speech—Free Exercise of Religion—Relation Back Doctrine of CRCP 15 (c)—CRS § 24-34-306(2)(b)(II).

This appeal arose from an administrative decision by the Colorado Civil Rights Commission (Commission), which upheld the decision of an administrative law judge (ALJ), who ruled in favor of Craig and Mullins (complainants) and against Masterpiece Cakeshop, Inc. (Masterpiece) and its owner, Phillips, on cross-motions for summary judgment. In July 2012, complainants visited Masterpiece and asked Phillips to design and create a cake to celebrate their same-sex wedding. Phillips declined, stating he doesn’t create wedding cakes for same-sex weddings because of his religious beliefs.

Craig and Mullins filed charges of discrimination with the Colorado Civil Rights Division (Division), alleging discrimination based on sexual orientation under the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act (CADA). Following a finding of probable cause, complainants filed a formal complaint with the Office of Administrative Courts, alleging Masterpiece had discriminated against them in a place of public accommodation because of their sexual orientation, in violation of CRS § 24-34-601(2).

The ALJ found in favor of complainants on cross-motions for summary judgment; the Commission affirmed and issued a cease and desist order requiring that Masterpiece (1) take remedial measures to ensure compliance with CADA, and (2) file quarterly compliance reports for two years with the Division.

On appeal, Philips claimed error in denying a motion to dismiss, alleging the Commission lacked jurisdiction to adjudicate the charges against him because only Masterpiece was named in the initial charge of discrimination with the Commission. The ALJ applied the relation back doctrine of CRCP 15(c) and found that adding Philips was permissible. The Court agreed and held that the relation back doctrine applied to a CADA charging document.

On the merits, Masterpiece argued it was error for the ALJ to conclude that its refusal to create a wedding cake was due to respondents’ sexual orientation, not its opposition to same-sex marriage. The Court disagreed. Because the act of same-sex marriage is closely correlated to respondents’ sexual orientation, it was not error for the ALJ to find that the refusal to create the wedding cake was because of their sexual orientation, in violation of CADA.

The Court considered whether the Commission’s application of the law violated Masterpiece’s rights to freedom of speech and free exercise of religion. Masterpiece argued that wedding cakes convey a celebratory message about marriage and therefore it was being unconstitutionally compelled to convey a celebratory message about same-sex marriage in conflict with its religious beliefs. The Court disagreed. The order merely requires that Masterpiece not discriminate against potential customers in violation of CADA, and such conduct, even if compelled by the government, is not sufficiently expressive to warrant First Amendment protections.

Masterpiece also contended that the Commission’s order unconstitutionally infringed on its right of free exercise of religion. The Court concluded that CADA is a neutral law of general applicability and therefore offends neither the First Amendment nor article II, § 4, of the Colorado Constitution. The order was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Default Judgment Must Be Set Aside When Defendants Not Served

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Burton v. Colorado Access on Thursday, August 13, 2015.

Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974—Process Service.

Burton was formerly employed by a company known as Colorado Access. Colorado Access sponsored the Colorado Access Long Term Disability Plan (plan), which was issued and administered by Unum Life Insurance Company of America (Unum). Burton sought benefits from Unum under the plan, and Unum paid her benefits for approximately two years before terminating them. Burton filed a complaint against the plan, claiming entitlement to additional benefits under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). Instead of serving the complaint on the plan, she served the complaint on the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor. Burton sought a default judgment against the plan, which the district court entered but later set aside. The district court also entered summary judgment in favor of the plan.

On appeal, Burton argued that the trial court erred in finding that she did not properly serve the plan administrator when she served the Secretary of Labor. A party intending to sue a plan must serve the plan administrator where it is designated as the agent for service of process. It is only where the summary plan description designates neither the plan administrator nor some other person as the agent for service of process that service on the Secretary of Labor is allowed. Given that Colorado Access was the plan administrator, and the plan designated Colorado Access as its agent for service of process, Burton could not properly serve process on the plan by serving the Secretary of Labor under § 1132(d)(1) of ERISA. Therefore, the district court did not err in determining that Burton failed to properly serve the plan.

Burton also argued that the district court erred in entering summary judgment in favor of the plan. The only proper defendants in an ERISA claim to recover plan benefits are those entities that make eligibility or payment decisions or are obligated to pay benefits. In this case, Unum (the insurer) made all decisions regarding eligibility for and payment of benefits, and made all such decisions with respect to Burton. Further, only Unum was obligated to pay any benefits owed to Burton under the plan. Therefore, the plan was not a proper defendant as to Burton’s ERISA benefits claim, and the trial court properly entered summary judgment in the plan’s favor.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Court of Appeals: Peremptory Challenges Can Only Be Used on Newly Empaneled Jurors After Waiver

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Terhorst on Thursday, August 13, 2015.

Peremptory Challenge—Waiver—Motion to Suppress—Evidence—Exigent Circumstances—Underage Drinking.

Defendant held a birthday party for his 17-year-old son at their large multistory home in Lakewood. Hundreds of teenagers attended the party, alcohol was present, and some of the teenagers were intoxicated. Police responded to the party after a neighbor reported that “underage kids” were drinking alcohol at defendant’s home. A jury found defendant guilty of four counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

On appeal, defendant argued that he was improperly denied a fifth peremptory challenge during jury selection. Defendant was entitled to five peremptory challenges pursuant to CRS § 16-10-104. Defendant’s counsel used peremptory challenges to strike two potential jurors and waived the third and fourth peremptory challenges. Under Crim.P. 24(d)(2), after having previously waived the use of a peremptory challenge, counsel can only make peremptory challenges “as to jurors subsequently called into the jury box.” Because no jurors were called into the jury box after defendant’s counsel’s waiver of the fourth peremptory challenge, defense counsel lost his ability to use any additional peremptory challenges.

Defendant also argued that the trial court erred in denying his motion to suppress evidence obtained after the warrantless entry and search of his home. Exigent circumstances can justify a warrantless search where there is a risk of immediate destruction of evidence. An underage drinking party attended by hundreds of suspected teenagers creates an exigent circumstance because there is a real threat that the alcohol, which is the evidence of underage drinking, will be destroyed. Accordingly, the police officers’ entry into defendant’s home was legally justified, and the trial court did not err in admitting the evidence derived from that entry.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Tenth Circuit: Unpublished Opinions, 8/18/2015

On Tuesday, August 18, 2015, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued four published opinions and four unpublished opinions.

Gargano v. Owners Insurance Co.

United States v. Fisher

Gregory v. Denham

Vigil v. Colvin

Case summaries are not provided for unpublished opinions. However, published opinions are summarized and provided by Legal Connection.