March 25, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Scope of Police Officer’s Testimony Within Knowledge of Average Computer User

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Froehler on Thursday, July 30, 2015.

Child Pornography—Lay Testimony—Personal Observations—Specialized Knowledge.

Froehler accidently left a flash drive on a public business computer at a hotel. The flash drive was recovered by two hotel guests, who opened it and found that some of the files contained child pornography. They turned over the flash drive to hotel security, who contacted police. A jury found Froehler guilty of sexual exploitation of a child.

On appeal, Froehler contended that the trial court abused its discretion by allowing the detective who investigated the case to give improper lay testimony. The detective testified about her personal observations of the dates the files on the flash drive were created and modified. Admission of the detective’s lay testimony was proper under CRE 701 because the method she used to view the dates did not require any specialized knowledge or familiarity with computers beyond that of the average lay person. The detective’s testimony about the ImageScan software program used to search Froehler’s home computers, however, was improperly admitted as lay testimony because this testimony did require specialized knowledge about the software. Nevertheless, its admission was harmless because no child pornography had been found on Froehler’s home computers and this evidence had no direct bearing on whether Froehler “knowingly possessed” the child pornography on the flash drive. The judgment was affirmed.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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