March 26, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Defense Counsel Did Not Err by Refusing to Call Expert Witness who Agreed with Prosecution

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Garner on Thursday, December 17, 2015.

First-Degree Murder—Ineffective Assistance of Counsel—Rebuttal Expert—Jury Instructions—Conflict of Interest.

Defendant was charged and found guilty of first-degree murder for stabbing a female friend to death when the two were most likely high on methamphetamine.

On appeal, defendant contended that the post-conviction court erred in denying his motion because the evidence at the post-conviction hearing established that his trial counsel was ineffective. Defense counsel was not ineffective for failing to call a rebuttal expert to testify regarding the cause of the victim’s death after defendant’s first expert changed her mind and agreed with the prosecution’s expert witnesses. Further, because the subject of hypothermia as a potential cause of death was not central to the case, defense counsel did not err in failing to call an expert on this issue. It was also reasonable for defense counsel to forgo calling a methamphetamine expert, who could cause more harm than good to defendant’s case, and to forego calling another inmate, Mr. K, when this witness had three felony convictions and two other inmates had already been used as impeachment witnesses to rebut the prosecution’s witness. It was also not a conflict of interest for defense counsel to represent defendant after previously having represented Mr. K, who was a potential witness for defendant.

Defendant also asserted that his attorney erred by not objecting to the jury instructions, which only contained a partial instruction regarding intoxication law. However, voluntary intoxication was not consistent with defendant’s theory of the case, which was that he did not kill the victim. Therefore, although defense counsel should have asked to include a complete instruction regarding intoxication law since the prosecution had introduced the instruction, it was not err in failing to do so given the theory of the case. In light of these considerations, the post-conviction court correctly determined that defendant had not shown an actual conflict of interest adversely affecting his counsel’s performance.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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