April 18, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Entry Into Motor Vehicle Contemplated by Motor Vehicle Theft Statute

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Wentling on Thursday, December 3, 2015.

First-Degree Criminal Trespass—Evidence—Motor Vehicle Theft—CRS § 18-1-303(1)—Equal Protection—Presentence Confinement Credit.

Wentling was arrested in Utah after he was found asleep in a vehicle that had been reported as stolen in Colorado. Wentling was charged with multiple offenses in Colorado, including first-degree criminal trespass with intent to commit motor vehicle theft.

On appeal, Wentling contended that there was insufficient evidence to convict him of first-degree criminal trespass with intent to commit motor vehicle theft. However, the motor vehicle theft statute does not preclude prosecution under a general criminal statute, and the People had discretion to prosecute under either. Here, there was sufficient evidence that Wentling entered the motor vehicle with the intent to commit motor vehicle theft inside the vehicle, which was sufficient to prove first-degree criminal trespass with intent to commit motor vehicle theft.

In the alternative, Wentling contended that he was improperly prosecuted in Colorado in violation of CRS § 18-1-303 because he was previously convicted in Utah for the same conduct. Wentling’s prosecution under the Colorado statute was not barred by CRS § 18-1-303(1) because the law defining each offense was intended to prevent a substantially different harm or evil.

Wentling also contended that when the People charged him with first-degree criminal trespass with intent to commit motor vehicle theft rather than attempted motor vehicle theft, it violated his right to equal protection under the law because it subjected him to more severe punishment. Attempted motor vehicle theft and criminal trespass have different elements and, thus, it is permissible for the legislature to prescribe different penalties for similar conduct. Therefore, the trial court did not violate Wentling’s right to equal protection.

Wentling further contended that the trial court erred when it denied his request for 89 additional days of presentence confinement credit (PSCC). Wentling was entitled to PSCC from October 11, 2011, when he arrived in Moffat County Jail, until February 7, 2012, when he finished his Utah sentence, because this period of time resulted from the charges brought by the State of Colorado. The case was remanded to amend the mittimus to include the correct additional PSCC days.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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