August 20, 2019

Tenth Circuit: Criminal Impersonation is Categorically a Crime Involving Moral Turpitude

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Veloz-Luvevano v. Lynch on July 24, 2015, and granted the respondent’s motion to publish on Monday, August 31, 2015.

Manuel Veloz-Luvevano entered the United States with a B-2 visitor visa in February 1998, but did not leave when the 6-month entry period expired. In July 2000, he was arrested by Colorado authorities for possessing a forged social security card and released on bond, but he failed to appear for court proceedings. In September 2009, he was found and re-arrested on the same criminal charges. Three days later, the federal government initiated removal proceedings. In February 2010, while the removal proceedings were pending, he pleaded guilty to the criminal impersonation charges. In December 2010, he conceded removability but applied for cancellation of removal, claiming removal would cause hardship to his wife and children. The government moved to pretermit his application because criminal impersonation is categorically a crime involving moral turpitude (CIMT) since it necessarily involves fraud. As an alternative, the government gave Veloz-Luvevano the opportunity to accept a pre-conclusion voluntary departure if he waived his appeal. He accepted the government’s offer and was given until July 30, 2012, to voluntarily depart from the United States.

In May 2012, through new counsel, Veloz-Luvevano appealed to the BIA, claiming the IJ erred in pretermitting his application. The BIA summarily dismissed the appeal on July 27, 2012. Veloz-Luvevano did not leave the United States, and in November 2012 he filed a motion to reopen the removal proceedings, claiming ineffective assistance of counsel. The IJ denied the motion as untimely, and, alternatively, ruled that Veloz-Luvevano’s Colorado conviction was, in fact, a CIMT, and therefore Veloz-Luvevano was not eligible for cancellation of removal. Veloz-Luvevano again appealed to the BIA, and the BIA decided that criminal impersonation was categorically a CIMT, denying his motion. Veloz-Luvevano appealed to the Tenth Circuit.

The Tenth Circuit, like the BIA and IJ, determined Veloz-Luvevano was not eligible for cancellation of removal because criminal impersonation is categorically a CIMT, since it necessarily involves fraud. Veloz-Luvevano argued that, in his case, there was no fraud because the social security number he was using was not assigned to anyone. The Tenth Circuit rejected his argument, noting first that Veloz-Luvevano failed to produce any supporting evidence for his argument that the social security number was unassigned, and next commenting that regardless of whether the number was assigned, criminal impersonation is categorically a CIMT. The Tenth Circuit found that Veloz-Luvevano’s first counsel was not ineffective for failing to produce documentation to support that the number was unassigned. The Tenth Circuit summarily disposed of Veloz-Luvevano’s remaining arguments as well, finding record support that his waiver of the right to appeal was knowing and voluntary and that neither the IJ nor the BIA was able to review the government’s discretionary decisions.

The BIA’s dismissal was affirmed.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Speak Your Mind

*