March 23, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Defendant’s Failure to Communicate with Counsel Does Not Warrant Continuance

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Faussett on Thursday, June 16, 2016.

Aggravated Motor Vehicle Theft in the First Degree—Motion for Continuance—Conflict of Interest—Co-Conspirator Statements.

Defendant’s conviction arose out of a theft of a scooter from a residential parking lot. Four days after the scooter was reported missing, police located a stolen pickup truck and ultimately arrested its driver. While in custody, the driver made several police-monitored phone calls to defendant and defendant’s girlfriend that included discussions about disposing of or selling the scooter. Defendant was arrested for the scooter’s theft and found guilty of aggravated motor vehicle theft in the first degree.

On appeal, defendant first argued it was error to deny his motion for a continuance. A week before trial, defendant’s counsel moved for a continuance because (1) the prosecutor had re-interviewed the girlfriend and counsel wanted to review a written report of the interview once it was completed, and (2) counsel had never met defendant outside of court to discuss the trial, and defendant had mentioned additional witnesses. The prosecutor responded that the new conversations with the girlfriend were consistent with what was in discovery. The court denied the motion. The Court of Appeals reviewed for abuse of discretion and found none: (1) there was no suggestion that the interview of the girlfriend contained anything different from what she had previously said, and (2) the lack of communication between counsel and defendant was the result of defendant’s actions, so no continuance should be granted. In addition, no offer of proof regarding the identity of the additional witnesses or what they might offer was made.

Defendant also argued that the court should have appointed “conflict-free counsel” to represent him. Because defendant never raised this issue with the district court nor expressed any dissatisfaction with counsel, there was no sua sponte requirement for the court to inquire as to this issue or provide him with different counsel.

Finally, defendant argued that it was error to admit evidence of four telephone calls made by the driver to him or the girlfriend. Prior to trial, the prosecutor filed a motion to allow admission of the calls under CRE 801(d)(2)(E) because they “were made by co-conspirators during the course and in furtherance of the conspiracy.” Defense counsel objected on the grounds that she wasn’t sure the prosecution could prove the existence of a conspiracy independent of the calls or that the calls were made in furtherance of the conspiracy. The prosecution argued that there was evidence that supported a conspiracy independent of the calls and the court agreed.

The Court examined each call to determine whether it was made in furtherance of the conspiracy. It found the first two calls were, but the last two, between the driver and the girlfriend, were not, and thus it was an abuse of discretion to admit them. However, because there was not a reasonable probability that their admission influenced the jury’s verdict, the error was harmless.

The judgment of conviction was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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