May 21, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Defendant’s Request for Jury Instruction on Lesser Nonincluded Offense Does Not Concede Guilt

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Geisick on Thursday, July 28, 2016.

Benjamin Geisick got into an argument with his girlfriend at a motel, and the motel manager called the police. The motel manager pointed Geisick out to an officer, who called to Geisick and tried to talk to him. Geisick attempted to flee, and the officer and Geisick engaged in a struggle. Geisick was ultimately arrested and charged with second degree assault on a peace officer and attempting to disarm a peace officer. He was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia based on a methamphetamine pipe officers found in his pocket.

At trial, the officer and Geisick offered very different accounts of the altercation. At the close of evidence, Geisick asked the trial court to instruct the jury on two lesser non-included offenses, resisting arrest and obstructing a peace officer. The jury found Geisick not guilty of assault and attempting to disarm but guilty of resisting arrest, obstructing a peace officer, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was convicted and sentenced, and he appealed.

On appeal, Geisick first argued that the trial court erred in denying his challenge for cause of one potential juror, forcing him to use a peremptory challenge. The Colorado Court of Appeals, following the Colorado Supreme Court’s opinion in People v. Novotny, determined that Geisick failed to show prejudice since the juror was dismissed and did not contribute to the guilty verdict.

Next, Geisick argued that the trial court erred in admitting hearsay evidence about the physical altercation with the officer. An officer who interviewed the officer involved in the altercation testified as to what he heard in the interview. The court of appeals concluded that any error in admitting the testimony was harmless. At trial, Geisick objected to the interviewing officer’s testimony, and the trial court agreed that the testimony was potentially impermissible hearsay because the officer was testifying as to the other officer’s truthfulness. However, the court allowed the testimony under the excited utterance and prior consistent statement exceptions to the hearsay rule. The court of appeals expressed doubt that the entirety of the altercating officer’s interview could be admitted as an excited utterance, and, because the altercating officer was not cross-examined about the interview, it could not be admitted as a prior inconsistent statement. Nevertheless, the court found that any error was harmless because the altercating officer described the incident in detail, the interviewing officer was not an eyewitness, the jury was aware that the interviewing officer was only testifying as to what happened in the interview, and it was unlikely that the interviewing officer’s testimony rendered the altercating officer’s account of the incident more credible since the jury acquitted Geisick on the assault and attempting to disarm charges.

Geisick next contended that the evidence was insufficient to support the convictions on the lesser non-included offenses. The court of appeals found that by proffering the lesser charges, he impliedly assented to the sufficiency of the evidence to support those charges. The court disagreed with a prior panel ruling on the same issue, which decided that the defendant had invited any error. The court of appeals found that by offering the instructions on the lesser non-included offenses, the defendant did not admit guilt on the charges, so invited error was inappropriate. However, because the defendant had to represent to the court that the non-included charges could be applicable, he affirmatively waived any argument about the sufficiency of the evidence.

The court of appeals found no error to support Geisick’s cumulative error arguments, and affirmed his convictions and sentence.

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