July 19, 2019

Tenth Circuit: ERISA Plan Consultant Did Not Act as ERISA Fiduciary When Calculating Benefits

The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its opinion in Lebahn v. National Farmers Union Uniform Pension Plan on Monday, July 11, 2016.

Trent Lebahn contacted a consultant hired by his company’s employee pension plan for information regarding his monthly distribution amount. The consultant told Mr. Lebahn that he would receive $8,444.18 per month and verified the amount when Mr. Lebahn asked her to double-check. He retired and began receiving the monthly payments, only to be informed a few months later that he had been being overpayed by nearly $5,000 per month. The plan’s attorney told Mr. Lebahn that he would need to return over $43,000 in overpayments. Unable to retire on the plan’s true monthly distribution, Mr. Lebahn tried to go back to work, but could not find a job. Mr. Lebahn and his wife sued under ERISA, arguing that the plan, the pension committee, and the consultant’s employer incurred liability under theories of breach of fiduciary duty and equitable estoppel. The defendants moved for dismissal based on failure to state a claim, which the district court granted, and the Lebahns appealed.

On appeal, the Tenth Circuit first addressed the Lebahns’ claims for breach of fiduciary duty. The district court dismissed the claims because the consultant had not acted as an ERISA fiduciary when calculating the pension benefits. The Tenth Circuit agreed, finding that because the consultant lacked discretionary authority in administering the pension plan, she was not a plan fiduciary and therefore the district court properly dismissed the claims.

The Tenth Circuit found that the district court also correctly dismissed the Lebahns’ equitable estoppel claims. The district court found that the Lebahns had failed to plead facts to satisfy two of the five prongs of equitable estoppel: awareness of the true facts and justifiable reliance. The Lebahns failed to adequately address justifiable reliance on appeal and therefore forfeited their argument.

The Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal of the Lebahns’ claims.

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