May 20, 2019

Colorado Court of Appeals: Defendant’s Wife Can Initiate Police Interview After Invocation of Right to Counsel

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People v. Cardman on Thursday, September 22, 2016.

Sexual Assault—Custodial Interrogation—Miranda—Right to Counsel—Third Party.

The police executed a search warrant on defendant’s home after the victim reported that defendant had sexually assaulted her. During the search, they recovered a weapon, and defendant was arrested on the charge of possession of a weapon by a previous offender. Defendant promptly exercised his rights to remain silent and to counsel, and the police ceased questioning. Two days later, a police detective conducted another interview of defendant during which defendant admitted to three instances of sexual contact with the victim. An audio recording of defendant’s second police interview was admitted at trial. Defendant was convicted of multiple counts of sexual assault on a child.

On appeal, defendant contended that the district court erred by not suppressing statements he made during his second custodial interrogation because he had previously invoked his right to counsel and did not himself reinitiate communication with the police. To establish that a suspect has reinitiated discussions with the police after previously invoking his right to counsel, the prosecution must show that (1) the police reasonably believed that the suspect directed a third party to inform them that he wanted to have “a generalized discussion about the investigation,” and (2) the police confirmed with the suspect that he had so indicated. Here, the detective’s testimony was clear that defendant’s wife informed him that defendant had questions about the investigation. Further, the detective knew the caseworker had also been in contact with defendant after the first interview, and she also informed him that both defendant and his wife had questions about the investigation. The detective then called defendant at the jail and confirmed that defendant desired to speak with him. Therefore, defendant “adequately evinced a willingness and a desire to” reinitiate communication with the police through a third party and there was no error in admitting his inculpatory statements.

Defendant also contended that the statements he made in the second interview were not voluntary and that the court erred in not holding a hearing on the issue of voluntariness. The court of appeals did not reach the merits of this issue because defendant moved to suppress the statements solely on reinitiation grounds and thus waived the voluntariness claims.

Defendant also argued that reversal is required because the recording of the interview admitted at trial included the detective’s assertions that he believed the victim and did not believe defendant’s denials of the victim’s allegations, and because the detective testified that he did not believe defendant. The court discerned no plain error in the admission of this evidence.

The judgment was affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

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