December 18, 2018

Bills Signed Changing Revenge Pornography Crimes, Amending Laws Related to Bicycles Approaching Intersections, and More

On Thurdsay, May 3, 2018, Governor Hickenlooper signed seven bills into law. To date, he has signed 211 bills and sent two to the Secretary of State without a signature. The bills signed Thursday include a bill changing the laws concerning revenge pornography crimes, a bill requiring state agencies to conduct analyses to determine which businesses are not complying with their rules, a bill permitting municipalities to adopt rules concerning bicycles approaching intersections, and more. The bills signed Thursday are summarized here.

  • SB 18-132 – “Concerning a Waiver of Federal Law to Permit Insurance Carriers to Offer Catastrophic Health Plans to Any Individual Residing in Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Sen. Jim Smallwood and Rep. Chris Kennedy. The bill requires the commissioner of insurance to conduct an actuarial analysis to determine if the sale of catastrophic health plans to Colorado residents 30 years of age and older and not meeting a hardship requirement would result in a reduction in advanced premium tax credits received by Colorado residents or increase the average premiums of individual health plans.
  • SB 18-144 – “Concerning the Regulation of Bicycles Approaching Intersections,” by Sen. Andy Kerr and Reps. Yeulin Willett & Chris Hansen. The bill permits a municipality or county to adopt a local ordinance or resolution regulating the operation of bicycles approaching intersections with stop signs or illuminated red traffic control signals. Under a local regulation, a bicyclist approaching a stop sign must slow to a reasonable speed and, when safe to do so, may proceed through the intersection without stopping. A bicyclist approaching an illuminated red traffic control signal must stop at the intersection and, when safe to do so, may proceed through the intersection.
  • SB 18-177 – “Concerning Procedures when Certain Private Schools Cease Operations,” by Sens. Kevin Priola & Nancy Todd and Reps. Jeff Bridges & Lang Sias. Under existing law, private occupational schools and certain private degree-granting schools are required to provide a bond or other form of surety that is used to facilitate transfer or to provide tuition and fee reimbursement for students in the event that the school closes. When a private occupational school closes, that school’s records must be maintained by the private occupational school board in the Division of Private Occupational Schools. The bill allows the Department of Education to make a claim on a surety bond for reimbursement of actual administrative costs associated with a school closure.
  • HB 18-1193 – “Concerning the Advanced Placement Incentives Pilot Program, and, in Connection Therewith, Making an Appropriation,” by Reps. James Wilson & Barbara McLachlin and Sens. Ray Scott & Rachel Zenzinger. The bill extends the pilot program three years. It requires the Department of Education to report the number of students in the pilot program who enrolled in advanced placement courses during the prior school year and to collect disaggregated data from the advanced placement exam vendor to capture the performance of students who are participating in the pilot program on the end-of-course advanced placement exams.
  • HB 18-1250 – “Concerning an Analysis to Improve Compliance with Departmental Rules by Regulated Businesses,” by Reps. Tracy Kraft-Tharp & Lang Sias and Sen. Kevin Priola. The bill equires each state agency to conduct an analysis of noncompliance with its rules to identify rules with the greatest frequency of noncompliance, rules that generate the greatest amount of fines, how many first-time offenders were given the opportunity to cure a minor violation, and what factors contribute to noncompliance by regulated businesses. The analysis will guide each department on how to improve its education and outreach to regulated businesses on compliance with the department’s rules.
  • HB 18-1257 – “Concerning a Correction to House Bill 16-1316 by Reinserting the Word ‘Not,'” by Rep. Paul Rosenthal and Sen. John Cooke. House Bill 16-1316 amended the venue statute for transferring child welfare proceedings between counties and inadvertently struck the word ‘not’ in one sentence. Due to this error, courts are not allowed to transfer child welfare proceedings between counties after adjudication even though the intent of House Bill 16-1316 was to allow post-adjudication transfers. The bill reinserts the word ‘not’ to allow such transfers.
  • HB 18-1264 – “Concerning Measures to Clarify the Scope of Revenge Porn Criminal Offenses,” by Reps. Dominique Jackson & Terri Carver and Sens. John Cooke & Rhonda Fields. Currently, Colorado criminalizes posting nude images of another person for harassment purposes or for pecuniary gain. The bill adds images of sex acts that may not include nude images, removes the requirement that the defendant intend to inflict serious emotional distress removes as an exception to the crimes that the image relates to a newsworthy event, and clarifies that the images subject to the crimes may be disclosed by law enforcement personnel, human or social services personnel, prosecutors, and court personnel in the course of their normal business.

For a complete list of the governor’s 2018 legislative actions, click here.

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