December 18, 2018

Colorado Court of Appeals: Then-Applicable Competency Statute for Juveniles Not Unconstitutional Facially or As Applied

The Colorado Court of Appeals issued its opinion in People in Interest of A.C.E.-D. on Thursday, November 15, 2018.

Juvenile Delinquency—Competency—Evidence.

Following a complaint of shoplifting, police officers contacted A.C.E-D. He confessed, led them to the merchandise, and was charged with misdemeanor theft. In a separate case, A.C.E-D. was charged with misdemeanor harassment based on Facebook messages sent to his ex-girlfriend. In both cases, A.C.E-D. pleaded guilty. Before sentencing, he moved to determine competency and later moved to withdraw his guilty pleas. The court ordered a competency evaluation, found A.C.E-D. competent, allowed A.C.E-D. to withdraw his guilty pleas, and conducted a bench trial. The court found A.C.E-D. guilty of the charges and adjudicated him a juvenile delinquent.

On appeal, A.C.E-D. argued that the previous iteration of the competency statute for juveniles, C.R.S. § 19-2-1301(2), was facially unconstitutional or unconstitutional as applied because it incorporated the definition of “incompetent to proceed” for adults in criminal proceedings set out in C.R.S. § 16-8.5-101(11), which did not allow the court to consider A.C.E-D.’s age and maturity. A juvenile adjudication need only be fundamentally fair, and using the same competency test for both juveniles and adults is fundamentally fair. Because A.C.E-D. failed to show that under no set of circumstances would the statute be constitutional, the trial court’s finding that the statute was not facially invalid was proper.

A.C.E-D. also argued that that statute was unconstitutional as applied to him because the trial court’s application precluded him from being declared incompetent since he didn’t prove he had a mental or developmental disability. Sufficient evidence in the record supports the trial court’s finding of competency under Dusky v. United States, 362 U.S. 402, 402 (1960), and thus A.C.E-D. did not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the trial court unconstitutionally applied the statute to him.

A.C.E-D. also argued that the trial court erred in admitting Facebook messages because the prosecution did not provide sufficient evidence to show that he wrote and sent the Facebook messages. The prosecution met the heightened standard for Facebook messages, and A.C.E-D’s contrary evidence goes to the weight of the messages. The trial court did not abuse its discretion in admitting the messages.

The adjudications were affirmed.

Summary provided courtesy of Colorado Lawyer.

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