September 25, 2018

Curtis “Lane” Porter Appointed to Prowers County Court

On Thursday, June 9, 2016, Governor Hickenlooper appointed Curtis “Lane” Porter to the Prowers County Court. Porter will fill a vacancy created by the retirement of Hon. Larry E. Stutler, effective July 1, 2016.

Porter is currently a Deputy District Attorney in the Fifteenth Judicial District, where he has worked since 2009. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado in 2005 and his law degree from the Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville in 2008.

For more information about the appointment, click here.

Hon. Larry E. Stutler to Retire from Prowers County Court

Stutler (Formatted)On Monday, April 4, 2016, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced the retirement of Hon. Larry E. Stutler from the Prowers County Court, effective July 1, 2016.

Judge Stutler was appointed to the Prowers County Court in 1995, where he hears cases including civil, traffic, and misdemeanor offenses. He is also the municipal judge in Lamar. Prior to his appointment to the Prowers County Court, he was in general practice in Lamar, focusing on civil and criminal litigation with some background in real estate and probate. Judge Stutler received his undergraduate degree from the University of Denver and his law degree from the University of Colorado Law School.

Applications are now being accepted for the upcoming vacancy on the Prowers County Court. Eligible applicants must be qualified electors of Prowers County and must have graduated from high school or attained the equivalent. Application forms are available on the State Judicial website and from the ex officio chair of the Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission, Justice Monica Marquez. Applications must be received no later than 4 p.m. on May 4, 2016, and anyone wishing to nominate another must do so no later than 4 p.m. on April 27, 2016.

For more information about the vacancy, click here.

Supreme Court and Judicial Nominating Commission Appointments Announced

On Friday, December 4, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced the appointments of several people to judicial nominating commissions and the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, effective January 1, 2016, for six-year terms expiring December 31, 2021.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a judicial nominating commission comprised of seven members—four non-attorneys and three attorneys, of whom no more than four may be from the same political party. In districts with populations of less than 35,000, at least four of the nominating commission members must be non-attorneys. Judicial nominating commission members must live in the judicial district for which they will serve. Judicial nominating commissions are responsible for reviewing applicants for judicial vacancies in their district and selecting applicants for nomination to the bench. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission selects applicants for nomination to the Colorado Supreme Court and Colorado Court of Appeals. It is comprised of fifteen members—one non-attorney and one attorney from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, plus one at-large member.

Governor Hickenlooper’s nominating commission appointments are as follows:

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission: Jay Patel of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from the Fifth Congressional District.
  • Second Judicial District Nominating Commission: Melody Mirbaba of Denver was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Denver County.
  • Third Judicial District Nominating Commission: Pamela Nelson of Trinidad was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Las Animas County and Mary Ray White of La Veta was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Huerfano County.
  • Fourth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Mary Linden of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from El Paso County; Philip Mella of Woodland Park was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Teller County; Juan Moreno of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from El Paso County; Daniel Nicholson of Woodland Park was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Teller County.
  • Fifth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Heather Manolakas of Basalt was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Eagle County; Todd Rankin of Breckenridge was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Summit County.
  • Seventh Judicial District Nominating Commission: Richard Haggerty of Telluride was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from San Miguel County; William Masters of Telluride was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from San Miguel County; Eric McPhail of Gunnison was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Gunnison County.
  • Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Tracy Ann Oldemeyer of Fort Collins was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Larimer County; Katherine Corey of Johnstown was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Larimer County; Thomas Milligan of Fort Collins was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Larimer County.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Scott Grosscup of Glenwood Springs was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Garfield County.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Gloria Gutierrez of Pueblo was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Pueblo County.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Garth Nieschburg of Lamar was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Prowers County.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: H. Barton Mendenhall, II, of Rocky Ford was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Otero County; Anita “Betsy” Dillon of Ordway was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Crowley County.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Christina Gomez of Commerce City was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Adams County; Jennifer Chavez of Westminster was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Adams County; Joann Dawe of Westminster was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Adams County.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Adelita DeHerrera of Aurora was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Arapahoe County.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Thomas Fasano of Windsor was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Weld County; Virginia Rosales of Greeley was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Weld County.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Benita Duran of Boulder was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Boulder County; Mary Friedrichs of Boulder was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Boulder County.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission: Martha Kent of Grand Junction was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Mesa County; Lesley McWhirter of Grand Junction was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Mesa County.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission: Kinsey Ertel of Cortez was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Montezuma County.

For more information about the appointments, click here. For more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Judicial Performance Commission Appointments Announced

On Friday, October 9, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to several Commissions on Judicial Performance. These appointments are effective December 1, 2015, for terms expiring November 30, 2019. The Commissions on Judicial Performance were created by the General Assembly in 1988 in order to provide voters with fair, responsible, and constructive evaluations of judges seeking retention. Each of Colorado’s judicial districts has a Commission and there is one for the state appellate judges. Commissions consist of ten volunteer commissioners — four attorneys and six non-attorneys. Governor Hickenlooper’s appointments are as follows:

  • State Commission on Judicial Performance – Suzanne Jalbert of Fraser was appointed to serve as a non-attorney.
  • Third Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Nancy Lake of Weston was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Eleventh Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Jenna Mazzucca of Salida was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Amy Schmidt of Laird was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Joshua Vogel of Lamar was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Heidi Miller of Commerce City was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Valerie Garcia of Centennial was appointed to serve as an attorney.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission – Martin Beier of Frederick was appointed to serve as an attorney.

For more information about the commissions on judicial performance, click here. For more information about the appointments, click here.

Application Period Open for Several Judicial Nominating Commission Vacancies

On Thursday, September 24, 2015, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced several upcoming vacancies on Judicial Nominating Commissions. The application period for these vacancies is now open. Applications must be submitted online at https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/governor/boards-and-commissions-application, and will be accepted through October 31, 2015. The vacancies will open December 31, 2015.

Judicial nominating commissions are comprised of seven members from their respective judicial districts, of whom no more than four can be of the same political party. In voting districts with populations greater than 35,000, no more than three judicial nominating commission members can be attorneys. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission consists of one attorney and one non-attorney from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, plus one at large member who is not an attorney. The nominating commissions vacancies are listed here.

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney in the Fifth Congressional District.
  • First Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney in Gilpin County.
  • Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Third Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for attorneys.
  • Fourth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Four vacancies, one attorney and three non-attorneys. No more than two appointees may be registered as Democrat, no more than three may be registered as Republican, and one must reside in Teller County.
  • Fifth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one of the appointees may be registered as Democrat.
  • Seventh Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. One appointee must be from San Miguel County and one must be from Gunnison County, and no more than two appointees may be registered as Republican.
  • Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. No more than two appointees may be registered as either Democrat or Republican.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. No more than one appointee may be registered as Democrat.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one appointee may be registered as Republican.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for non-attorneys.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for non-attorneys.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one appointee may be registered as Republican.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney. The appointee may not be registered as Republican.

For more information about nominating commissions, click here. For more information about the vacancies, click here.

Hon. P. Douglas Tallman to Retire from Fifteenth Judicial District Court

On Monday, August 3, 2015, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced that Hon. P. Douglas Tallman will retire from the Fifteenth Judicial District Court, effective October 2, 2015. Judge Tallman was appointed to the district court in 2003. Prior to his appointment, he served as Cheyenne County Court judge from 1987 to 2002. He is active in his local community, and he participates yearly in the annual Lamar Hospice Golf Tournament.

Applications are now being accepted for the vacancy. Eligible applicants must be qualified electors of the Fifteenth Judicial District and must have been admitted to practice law in Colorado for five years. Application forms are available from the State Judicial website and also from Justice Monica Marquez, ex officio chair of the Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission. Applications must be received by 4 p.m. on August 24, 2015. Anyone wishing to nominate another must do so no later than 4 p.m. on August 17, 2015. For more information about the vacancy, click here.

Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions and Supreme Court Nominating Commission Announced

On Wednesday, December 31, 2014, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced appointments of several people to judicial nominating commissions throughout the state, and to the Supreme Court Nominating Commission.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for evaluating and recommending candidates for judicial vacancies in their respective judicial districts. They are comprised of seven members and one non-voting supreme court justice (the ex officio chair), of which no more than four members can be of the same political party and no more than three can be admitted to practice law in Colorado. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission evaluates and recommends candidates for vacancies on the Colorado Court of Appeals and the Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of two people from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, one of whom may be admitted to practice law in Colorado and one of whom may not.

The following individuals were appointed to the judicial and Supreme Court nominating commissions:

Supreme Court Nominating Commission: 

  • Shannon Stevenson of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from the Second Congressional District.

Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Larry McGee of Canon City, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Fremont County.
  • Herbert Phillips of Alma, to serve as a Republican attorney from Park County.
  • Margaret Walker of Nathrop, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Chaffee County.

Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • James Stimson of Steamboat Springs, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Routt County.

Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Chris Rundell of Lamar, to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Prowers County.

Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Josh Marks of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.
  • Jodi Martin of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.

Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Sharon Ann Lyons Hanson of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Montezuma County.
  • Daniel Porter of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic non-attorney from Montezuma County.

All of the appointments are effective January 1, 2015, to serve six-year terms expiring December 31, 2020. For more information about the appointments, click here, and for more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Application Period Open for Judicial Nominating Commission Vacancies

The Colorado State Judicial Branch announced on Monday, September 8, 2014, that several of the state’s judicial district nominating commissions, as well as the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, will have vacancies as of December 31, 2014. Applications are available on the State of Colorado Boards and Commissions application page, and may only be submitted online on that page. Applications will be accepted through October 31, 2014.

The following nominating commissions will have vacancies:

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – one vacancy for an attorney in the Second Congressional District.
  • Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission – three vacancies, two for attorneys and one for a non-attorney. No more than two appointees may be registered Democrats.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – two attorney vacancies. No more than one appointee may be a registered Republican.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy. The appointee may not be a registered Republican.

For more information about the judicial nominating commissions, click here. For the application page, click here.

Governor Announces Appointment to 15th Judicial District Nominating Commission

On Friday, June 6, 2014, Governor Hickenlooper announced his appointment of Joshua Lee Vogel to the Judicial Nominating Commission for the Fifteenth Judicial District. Vogel will serve as an attorney from Prowers County for a term expiring December 31, 2019.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission comprised of seven members, no more than four of which may be from the same political party and no more than three of which may be admitted to practice law in Colorado. Each judicial district nominating commission also has a non-voting Colorado Supreme Court justice as its chair. Judicial nominating commissions review applicants for vacancies on the county and district court benches in their judicial districts and submit nominees for appointment to the governor. For more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Non-Attorney Appointments to Judicial Nominating Commissions Announced

On Tuesday, December 31, 2013, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced the governor’s appointments to several of the state’s judicial nominating commissions.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for interviewing applicants for judicial vacancies and selecting three of the applicants as nominees for appointment to the judiciary. The governor then has 15 days in which to appoint one of the three nominees to the bench. If the governor fails to appoint a nominee within this time, the Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court may select a nominee.

Each judicial district has a nominating commission comprised of seven citizen members who must reside in the judicial district. No more than four members may have the same political party affiliation, and at least four members must not be admitted to practice law in Colorado. Additionally, there is a Supreme Court Nominating Commission, responsible for nominating appointees for the Colorado Court of Appeals and Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission comprises one attorney and one non-attorney member from each of Colorado’s seven judicial congressional districts, with one additional non-attorney member.

Tuesday’s appointments are as follows:

  • First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Marie Belew Wheatley of Lakewood to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Jefferson County.
  • Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Kim Martin of Hesperus to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from La Plata County.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission – David Fiore of Basalt to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Pitkin County.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Sharon Swerdfeger of Pueblo West to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Pueblo County.
  • Twelfth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Carla Gomez of Center to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Saguache County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Brigitte Shafer of Akron to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Washington County.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Marlin Miller of Eads to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Kiowa County.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Robert Stwalley of Las Animas to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Bent County; Dwight Gardner of Ordway to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Crowley County.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Linda Rodriguez of Broomfield to serve as a n0n-attorney and a Democrat from Broomfield County.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Karla Rikansrud of Boulder to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Boulder County.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Eric Sandstrom of Grand Junction to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Mesa County.
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – Robert Scott of Pagosa Springs to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from the Third Congressional District; James Carpenter of Englewood to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from the Sixth Congressional District; and Connie McArthur of Denver to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat at-large member.

Application Period Open for Vacancies on Supreme Court Nominating Commission and Various Judicial District Nominating Commissions

On Wednesday, September 11, 2013, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced vacancies on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission and the nominating commissions for 16 of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts. Twenty-nine vacancies were announced, and applications for these vacancies are due by 5 p.m. on October 11, 2013. Application forms for attorneys are available on the State Judicial website; applications for non-attorneys are available on the Governor’s Office website. All members of nominating commissions serve as volunteers.

Each judicial district nominating commission is comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys, no more than half of which plus one can share political party affiliation. Additionally, at least one member of each commission must reside in each county in the judicial district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district for whose nominating commission they seek appointment.

The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of seven attorneys and seven non-attorneys, plus one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney.

The nominating commissions with vacancies are listed here. Specifications as to residency, party affiliation, or whether the vacancy is for an attorney or non-attorney are listed as applicable.

  • First Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Second Judicial District – one attorney
  • Fourth Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Sixth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Ninth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Tenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Twelfth Judicial District – one attorney; must reside in Alamosa County
  • Thirteenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney; one must reside in Washington County and one must reside in Morgan County
  • Fifteenth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Sixteenth Judicial District – two non-attorneys; one must reside in Crowley County
  • Seventeenth Judicial District – two attorneys
  • Eighteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Nineteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Twentieth Judicial District  – one non-attorney
  • Twenty-First Judicial District – two attorneys and one non-attorney
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – two attorneys and three non-attorneys; one attorney must be from the First Congressional District and the other must be from the Sixth Congressional District; one non-attorney must be from the Third Congressional District, one must be from the Sixth Congressional District, and the third is the at-large position.

For more information on the vacancies, click here. For information about nominating commissions, click here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to the judicial nominating commissions for the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Second judicial districts.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that selects nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies. The nominating commissions are comprised of  seven citizens residing in that judicial district. No more than four members can be from the same political party, and there must be at least one voting member from each county in the district. The members serve six-year terms.

For a complete list of the appointed members and information regarding their residence, affiliation, and the duration of their terms, click here or visit the governor’s website. Information about the judicial nominating commissions and an application for consideration for appointment may be found here.