March 21, 2019

Supreme Court and Judicial Nominating Commission Appointments Announced

On Friday, December 4, 2015, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced the appointments of several people to judicial nominating commissions and the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, effective January 1, 2016, for six-year terms expiring December 31, 2021.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a judicial nominating commission comprised of seven members—four non-attorneys and three attorneys, of whom no more than four may be from the same political party. In districts with populations of less than 35,000, at least four of the nominating commission members must be non-attorneys. Judicial nominating commission members must live in the judicial district for which they will serve. Judicial nominating commissions are responsible for reviewing applicants for judicial vacancies in their district and selecting applicants for nomination to the bench. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission selects applicants for nomination to the Colorado Supreme Court and Colorado Court of Appeals. It is comprised of fifteen members—one non-attorney and one attorney from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, plus one at-large member.

Governor Hickenlooper’s nominating commission appointments are as follows:

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission: Jay Patel of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from the Fifth Congressional District.
  • Second Judicial District Nominating Commission: Melody Mirbaba of Denver was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Denver County.
  • Third Judicial District Nominating Commission: Pamela Nelson of Trinidad was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Las Animas County and Mary Ray White of La Veta was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Huerfano County.
  • Fourth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Mary Linden of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from El Paso County; Philip Mella of Woodland Park was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Teller County; Juan Moreno of Colorado Springs was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from El Paso County; Daniel Nicholson of Woodland Park was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Teller County.
  • Fifth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Heather Manolakas of Basalt was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Eagle County; Todd Rankin of Breckenridge was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Summit County.
  • Seventh Judicial District Nominating Commission: Richard Haggerty of Telluride was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from San Miguel County; William Masters of Telluride was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from San Miguel County; Eric McPhail of Gunnison was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Gunnison County.
  • Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Tracy Ann Oldemeyer of Fort Collins was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Larimer County; Katherine Corey of Johnstown was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Larimer County; Thomas Milligan of Fort Collins was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Larimer County.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Scott Grosscup of Glenwood Springs was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Garfield County.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Gloria Gutierrez of Pueblo was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Pueblo County.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Garth Nieschburg of Lamar was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Prowers County.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: H. Barton Mendenhall, II, of Rocky Ford was appointed to serve as a Republican and an attorney from Otero County; Anita “Betsy” Dillon of Ordway was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Crowley County.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Christina Gomez of Commerce City was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Adams County; Jennifer Chavez of Westminster was appointed to serve as a Republican and a non-attorney from Adams County; Joann Dawe of Westminster was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Adams County.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Adelita DeHerrera of Aurora was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Arapahoe County.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Thomas Fasano of Windsor was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Weld County; Virginia Rosales of Greeley was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Weld County.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission: Benita Duran of Boulder was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Boulder County; Mary Friedrichs of Boulder was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Boulder County.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission: Martha Kent of Grand Junction was appointed to serve as a Democrat and an attorney from Mesa County; Lesley McWhirter of Grand Junction was appointed to serve as a Democrat and a non-attorney from Mesa County.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission: Kinsey Ertel of Cortez was appointed to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Montezuma County.

For more information about the appointments, click here. For more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Application Period Open for Several Judicial Nominating Commission Vacancies

On Thursday, September 24, 2015, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced several upcoming vacancies on Judicial Nominating Commissions. The application period for these vacancies is now open. Applications must be submitted online at https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/governor/boards-and-commissions-application, and will be accepted through October 31, 2015. The vacancies will open December 31, 2015.

Judicial nominating commissions are comprised of seven members from their respective judicial districts, of whom no more than four can be of the same political party. In voting districts with populations greater than 35,000, no more than three judicial nominating commission members can be attorneys. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission consists of one attorney and one non-attorney from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, plus one at large member who is not an attorney. The nominating commissions vacancies are listed here.

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney in the Fifth Congressional District.
  • First Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney in Gilpin County.
  • Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Third Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for attorneys.
  • Fourth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Four vacancies, one attorney and three non-attorneys. No more than two appointees may be registered as Democrat, no more than three may be registered as Republican, and one must reside in Teller County.
  • Fifth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one of the appointees may be registered as Democrat.
  • Seventh Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. One appointee must be from San Miguel County and one must be from Gunnison County, and no more than two appointees may be registered as Republican.
  • Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. No more than two appointees may be registered as either Democrat or Republican.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for an attorney.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Three vacancies, one for an attorney and two for non-attorneys. No more than one appointee may be registered as Democrat.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one appointee may be registered as Republican.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for non-attorneys.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies for non-attorneys.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Two vacancies, one for an attorney and one for a non-attorney. No more than one appointee may be registered as Republican.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – One vacancy for a non-attorney. The appointee may not be registered as Republican.

For more information about nominating commissions, click here. For more information about the vacancies, click here.

Judicial Performance and Nominating Commission Appointments Announced

This week, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced the governor’s appointment of several members of judicial performance commissions throughout the state and one member of a judicial nominating commission. Armando Valdez of La Jara was appointed to the Twelfth Judicial District Nominating Commission, to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Conejos County. His term will expire December 31, 2020. Attorney Norman Ray Mueller of Denver was reappointed to the Second Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission. His term is effective December 1, 2015, and will expire November 30, 2019. Lindsey Parlin of Leadville was reappointed to the Fifth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission, to serve as an attorney for a term effective from December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019. Michael Andrew Goldman of Durango was reappointed to the Sixth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission. He is an attorney who will serve a term from December 1, 2015 through November 30, 2019. Attorney Christopher Michael Turner of Pueblo was also reappointed to the Tenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission for a term effective December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019. Amanda C. Hopkins of Alamosa, an attorney, was reappointed to the Twelfth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission to serve from December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019. Russell Allen Zane of La Junta was reappointed to the Sixteenth Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission. He will serve from December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019. Attorney Lance Phillip Timbreza of Grand Junction was reappointed to the Twenty-first Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission, also to serve from December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019. And finally, Peter Ortego of Lewis, who is an attorney, was reappointed to the Twenty-second Judicial District Judicial Performance Commission for a term effective December 1, 2015, through November 30, 2019.

Judicial nominating commissions are responsible for reviewing applications and selecting nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies in their district. Judicial performance commissions were created to provide voters with fair, responsible, and constructive evaluations of judges in their judicial district who face retention elections. For more information about the commissions and the appointments, click here.

Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions and Supreme Court Nominating Commission Announced

On Wednesday, December 31, 2014, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced appointments of several people to judicial nominating commissions throughout the state, and to the Supreme Court Nominating Commission.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for evaluating and recommending candidates for judicial vacancies in their respective judicial districts. They are comprised of seven members and one non-voting supreme court justice (the ex officio chair), of which no more than four members can be of the same political party and no more than three can be admitted to practice law in Colorado. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission evaluates and recommends candidates for vacancies on the Colorado Court of Appeals and the Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of two people from each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts, one of whom may be admitted to practice law in Colorado and one of whom may not.

The following individuals were appointed to the judicial and Supreme Court nominating commissions:

Supreme Court Nominating Commission: 

  • Shannon Stevenson of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from the Second Congressional District.

Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Larry McGee of Canon City, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Fremont County.
  • Herbert Phillips of Alma, to serve as a Republican attorney from Park County.
  • Margaret Walker of Nathrop, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Chaffee County.

Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • James Stimson of Steamboat Springs, to serve as a non-attorney Democrat from Routt County.

Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Chris Rundell of Lamar, to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Prowers County.

Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Josh Marks of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.
  • Jodi Martin of Louisville, to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Boulder County.

Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission:

  • Sharon Ann Lyons Hanson of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic attorney from Montezuma County.
  • Daniel Porter of Cortez, to serve as a Democratic non-attorney from Montezuma County.

All of the appointments are effective January 1, 2015, to serve six-year terms expiring December 31, 2020. For more information about the appointments, click here, and for more information about judicial nominating commissions, click here.

Application Period Open for Judicial Nominating Commission Vacancies

The Colorado State Judicial Branch announced on Monday, September 8, 2014, that several of the state’s judicial district nominating commissions, as well as the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, will have vacancies as of December 31, 2014. Applications are available on the State of Colorado Boards and Commissions application page, and may only be submitted online on that page. Applications will be accepted through October 31, 2014.

The following nominating commissions will have vacancies:

  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – one vacancy for an attorney in the Second Congressional District.
  • Eleventh Judicial District Nominating Commission – three vacancies, two for attorneys and one for a non-attorney. No more than two appointees may be registered Democrats.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – two attorney vacancies. No more than one appointee may be a registered Republican.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – one non-attorney vacancy. The appointee may not be a registered Republican.

For more information about the judicial nominating commissions, click here. For the application page, click here.

Judicial Nominating Commission Appointments Announced

On Friday, December 27, 2013, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to 14 of Colorado’s judicial nominating commissions, including the Supreme Court Nominating Commission.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for interviewing applicants for judicial vacancies and selecting three of the applicants for appointment to the judiciary. The governor then has 15 days in which to appoint one of the three nominees to the bench. If the governor fails to appoint a nominee within this time, the Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court may select a nominee.

Each judicial district has a nominating commission comprised of seven citizen members who must reside in the judicial district. No more than four members may have the same political party affiliation, and at least four members must not be admitted to practice law in Colorado. Additionally, there is a Supreme Court Nominating Commission, responsible for nominating appointees for the Colorado Court of Appeals and Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission comprises one attorney and one non-attorney member from each of Colorado’s seven judicial congressional districts, with one additional non-attorney member.

The appointments are as follows:

  • First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Thomas Overton of Golden to serve as a attorney and a Democrat from Jefferson County.
  • Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – Christina Habas of Denver to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from Denver County.
  • Fourth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Larry Gaddis of Colorado Springs to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from El Paso County.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Andrea Bryan of Carbondale to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Garfield County.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – James Whitmire of Pueblo to serve as an attorney and a Republican from Pueblo County.
  • Twelfth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Paul Motz of Alamosa to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from Alamosa County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Edward Zorn of Ft. Morgan to serve as an attorney and a Republican from Morgan County.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Daniel Carr of Westminster to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Adams County; Patricia Jarzobski of Westminster to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from Adams County.
  • Eighteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Candace Figa of Aurora to serve as an attorney and a Republican from Arapahoe County.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – William Crossier of Greeley to serve as an attorney and a Republican from Weld County.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Scott Burrill of Grand Junction to serve as an unaffiliated attorney from Mesa County; Amy Hand of Grand Junction to serve as an attorney and a Republican from Mesa County.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District Nominating Commission – Sean Murray of Mancos to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from Montezuma County.
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – Kathleen Lord of Denver to serve as an attorney from the First Congressional District; Michael Burg of Greenwood Village to serve as an attorney and a Democrat from the Sixth Congressional District.

Application Period Open for Vacancies on Supreme Court Nominating Commission and Various Judicial District Nominating Commissions

On Wednesday, September 11, 2013, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced vacancies on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission and the nominating commissions for 16 of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts. Twenty-nine vacancies were announced, and applications for these vacancies are due by 5 p.m. on October 11, 2013. Application forms for attorneys are available on the State Judicial website; applications for non-attorneys are available on the Governor’s Office website. All members of nominating commissions serve as volunteers.

Each judicial district nominating commission is comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys, no more than half of which plus one can share political party affiliation. Additionally, at least one member of each commission must reside in each county in the judicial district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district for whose nominating commission they seek appointment.

The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of seven attorneys and seven non-attorneys, plus one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney.

The nominating commissions with vacancies are listed here. Specifications as to residency, party affiliation, or whether the vacancy is for an attorney or non-attorney are listed as applicable.

  • First Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Second Judicial District – one attorney
  • Fourth Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Sixth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Ninth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Tenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Twelfth Judicial District – one attorney; must reside in Alamosa County
  • Thirteenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney; one must reside in Washington County and one must reside in Morgan County
  • Fifteenth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Sixteenth Judicial District – two non-attorneys; one must reside in Crowley County
  • Seventeenth Judicial District – two attorneys
  • Eighteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Nineteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Twentieth Judicial District  – one non-attorney
  • Twenty-First Judicial District – two attorneys and one non-attorney
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – two attorneys and three non-attorneys; one attorney must be from the First Congressional District and the other must be from the Sixth Congressional District; one non-attorney must be from the Third Congressional District, one must be from the Sixth Congressional District, and the third is the at-large position.

For more information on the vacancies, click here. For information about nominating commissions, click here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to 22nd Judicial District Nominating Commission

On Tuesday, February 26, 2013, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to several boards and commissions, including the 22nd Judicial District Nominating Commission and the Air Quality Control Commission.

Governor Hickenlooper appointed Stanley M. Morris of Cortez, to serve as an attorney and as a Republican from Montezuma County for the 22nd Judicial District. Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that reviews applications for judicial appointments and selects nominees for the governor’s appointment. There is also a Supreme Court Nominating Commission that selects nominees for appointment to the Court of Appeals and Supreme Court. The judicial district nominating commissions consist of seven citizens, three of whom may be licensed to practice law in the State of Colorado and of whom no more than four can be of the same political party.

The Air Quality Control Commission develops policy and regulates pollution to improve ambient air quality standards in Colorado. Governor Hickenlooper reappointed Teresa A. Coons of Grand Junction, to serve as a representative with scientific experience for a term expiring January 31, 2014, and appointed William R. Toor of Boulder, to serve as a representative with technical and private sector experience, and Jana Beth Milford of Boulder, to serve as a representative with legal and scientific experience. Their terms expire January 31, 2016.

For the complete list of the governor’s boards and commissions appointments, click here.

New Self-Help Centers Open for Pro Se Litigants in Sixth and Twenty-Second Judicial Districts

On Tuesday, February 5, 2013, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced the opening of self-help centers for pro se litigants in the Sixth and Twenty-Second Judicial Districts. The centers are in Durango and Cortez and are available for civil litigants.

The centers are part of the Judicial Branch’s program to address the need to provide legal services to people who cannot afford attorneys but have too many assets to qualify for legal aid. The centers are intended to ease the strain on court personnel who must spend time assisting pro se litigants.

Office hours for the Durango center are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hours for the Cortez center are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information on the self- help centers, click here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to the judicial nominating commissions for the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Second judicial districts.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that selects nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies. The nominating commissions are comprised of  seven citizens residing in that judicial district. No more than four members can be from the same political party, and there must be at least one voting member from each county in the district. The members serve six-year terms.

For a complete list of the appointed members and information regarding their residence, affiliation, and the duration of their terms, click here or visit the governor’s website. Information about the judicial nominating commissions and an application for consideration for appointment may be found here.

Application Period Open for Forty-Five Vacancies on Judicial Nominating Commissions

On behalf of Governor John Hickenlooper, Attorney General John Suthers, and Chief Justice Michael L. Bender, the Colorado Judicial Branch announced on Thursday, September 15, 2011, the opening of the application period for forty-five vacancies on judicial nominating commissions across the state.

Some positions are open now, but the majority of vacancies will occur when current commissioners’ six-year terms end December 31, 2011. All commissioners serve as volunteers. Applications are due on or before October 14.

Thirty-two vacancies must be filled by non-attorneys selected by the Governor. Thirteen vacancies must be filled by attorneys selected by joint action of the Governor, Attorney General, and Chief Justice. Vacancies will occur in twenty judicial district nominating commissions.

Each judicial district in Colorado has a nominating commission comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys who are tasked with selecting nominees for appointment to county and district judgeships. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is made up of seven attorneys, seven non-attorneys, and one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven Congressional Districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, which selects nominees for positions on the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals.

Application forms for vacancies on the various commissions can be found here. Completed application forms should be mailed to Romaine Pacheco, Governor’s Office of Boards and Commissions, 136 State Capitol Bldg., Denver, Colorado 80203.  They also can be faxed to (303) 866-6368 or sent by e-mail to boards@state.co.us.

Article VI, Section 24 of the Colorado Constitution requires that for any nominating commission, “no more than one-half of the commission members plus one, exclusive of the Supreme Court justice serving as ex officio chair, shall be members of the same political party.” The Constitution also requires that at least one commissioner reside in each of the counties of the district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district – or, for the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, the congressional district – to which they are applying for appointment.

Here is a list of upcoming nominating commission attorney vacancies along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • First Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have two non-attorney vacancies. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Seventh Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must reside in Ouray County.
  • Ninth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have three non-attorney vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Supreme Court: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of the Fifth Congressional District.

Here is a list of non-attorney vacancies, along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • Second Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Third Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: Two vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Eighth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must not be a registered Democrat.
  • Ninth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. At least one appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Tenth Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Eleventh Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twelfth Judicial District: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Mineral County and one a resident of Costilla County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither appointee may be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of Dolores County.
  • Supreme Court: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of the Second Congressional District and the other a resident of the Seventh Congressional District.

Click here to read the full release about the commission vacancies from State Judicial.

La Plata and Montezuma Counties Conducting Court Service-Improvement Program This Week

This week, judges, magistrates, clerks, and other court employees will again collect data to help improve the way the courts of Colorado’s Sixth and Twenty-Second Judicial Districts conduct their business. The court service-improvement program, which was first instituted in 2008, uses public surveys to gather information and assess the functioning and accessibility of the courts in each district. In the last three years, the surveys have been used at least once in each of Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts.

Judicial officers, clerks and other court employees will spend time talking to people about their experiences as jurors, parties to a case, or as recipients of other Judicial Branch services. Attorneys, law enforcement officers, and anyone who does business with the courts will be encouraged to participate.

People leaving the La Plata County Courthouse on Wednesday, July 20, and the Montezuma County Courthouse on Thursday, July 21, will be asked whether they had business with the courts and are willing to fill out a brief anonymous survey. The survey forms will be available both in English and Spanish.

The survey is designed to gauge public opinion about access to and fairness of the courts. Questions include whether people felt safe in the building, whether they could easily understand the forms they needed, and whether they felt their case was handled in a fair manner. Participants also are asked whether they felt the judge or magistrate listened to them, whether they had all the necessary information before making a decision, and whether they felt they were treated with courtesy and given clear information about the next step in their case.

In Fiscal Year 2010, about 10,600 cases were filed in the courts of the Sixth Judicial District.  That number includes 3,019 cases filed in District Court and 6,038 in La Plata County Court.

In Fiscal Year 2010, about 4,900 cases were filed in the courts of the Twenty-Second Judicial District.  That number includes 1,152 cases filed in District Court and 3,459 in Montezuma County Court.