June 24, 2019

Anthony Edwards Appointed to San Juan County Court

On Wednesday, May 21, 2014, the governor announced his appointment of Anthony Edwards to the San Juan County Court in the Sixth Judicial District. The appointment is effective July 1, 2014, upon the retirement of Hon. Lyndon K. Skinner.

Edwards is currently the principal of the San Juan Law Office, LLC, where he operates a general practice, including business law and transactional issues, civil litigation, real estate, trust and estate law, and criminal matters. He is also the CEO and founder of Crowdfunding Offerings, LLC, an online business that provides crowdfunding assistance. Additionally, he is the Silverton Trustee. He received an online undergraduate degree from Capella University in 2003, a master’s degree in Water Resources in 2007 from the University of New Mexico, and a J.D. from the University of New Mexico in 2009.

Finalists Selected for Judgeship on San Juan County Court Bench

On Tuesday, May 6, 2014, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced the selection of two finalists for a vacancy on the San Juan County Court bench. The vacancy, effective July 1, 2014, will be created by the retirement of Hon. Lyndon Skinner.

The two nominees are Anthony D. Edwards of Silverton and Melodee A. Horton, also of Silverton. Under the Colorado Constitution, the governor has 15 days in which to select one of the nominees for appointment. Comments about the nominees may be emailed to the governor at gov_judicialappointments@state.co.us.

For more information, click here.

Three Applicants for Judicial Vacancy on San Juan County Court

On Tuesday, April 15, 2014, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced that three people have applied for a vacancy on the San Juan County Court, created by the retirement of Hon. Lyndon K. Skinner. The Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission Rules of Procedure require disclosure of all applicants for judicial vacancies. The names of the three candidates are Anthony D. Edwards, William P. Gardner III and Melodee A. Horton, all of Silverton.

Public comments regarding any of the applicants are invited, and may be emailed to judicial.vacancies@judicial.state.co.us or directed to any member of the Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission. Contact information for members of the nominating commission is available here.

Hon. Lyndon K. Skinner of Sixth Judicial District to Retire

The Colorado State Judicial Branch announced the retirement of Hon. Lyndon K. Skinner of the Sixth Judicial District. Judge Skinner attended the University of Colorado from 1960 to 1965, joined the Army in 1965 and served until 1971, and then served on the Colorado State Patrol until 1997. In 1997, he was appointed as a municipal judge in Silverton, Colorado, and was appointed to the San Juan County Court in 2006. He is one of the few non-attorney judges serving in Colorado. His retirement will be effective July 1, 2014.

Applications are being accepted for the vacancy on the San Juan County Court bench. Eligible applicants must be qualified electors of San Juan County and must have graduated high school or achieved the equivalent. Application forms are available from the ex officio chair of the Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission, Justice Brian Boatright, and are also available on the State Judicial website. Applications must be filed no later than 4 p.m. on April 14, 2014. Anyone wishing to nominate a candidate must do so no later than 4 p.m. on April 7, 2014.

Click here for more information about the judicial vacancy.

Non-Attorney Appointments to Judicial Nominating Commissions Announced

On Tuesday, December 31, 2013, Governor Hickenlooper’s office announced the governor’s appointments to several of the state’s judicial nominating commissions.

The judicial nominating commissions are responsible for interviewing applicants for judicial vacancies and selecting three of the applicants as nominees for appointment to the judiciary. The governor then has 15 days in which to appoint one of the three nominees to the bench. If the governor fails to appoint a nominee within this time, the Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court may select a nominee.

Each judicial district has a nominating commission comprised of seven citizen members who must reside in the judicial district. No more than four members may have the same political party affiliation, and at least four members must not be admitted to practice law in Colorado. Additionally, there is a Supreme Court Nominating Commission, responsible for nominating appointees for the Colorado Court of Appeals and Colorado Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission comprises one attorney and one non-attorney member from each of Colorado’s seven judicial congressional districts, with one additional non-attorney member.

Tuesday’s appointments are as follows:

  • First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Marie Belew Wheatley of Lakewood to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Jefferson County.
  • Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Kim Martin of Hesperus to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from La Plata County.
  • Ninth Judicial District Nominating Commission – David Fiore of Basalt to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Pitkin County.
  • Tenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Sharon Swerdfeger of Pueblo West to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Pueblo County.
  • Twelfth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Carla Gomez of Center to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Saguache County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Brigitte Shafer of Akron to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Washington County.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Marlin Miller of Eads to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from Kiowa County.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Robert Stwalley of Las Animas to serve as an unaffiliated non-attorney from Bent County; Dwight Gardner of Ordway to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Crowley County.
  • Seventeenth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Linda Rodriguez of Broomfield to serve as a n0n-attorney and a Democrat from Broomfield County.
  • Twentieth Judicial District Nominating Commission – Karla Rikansrud of Boulder to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Boulder County.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District Nominating Commission – Eric Sandstrom of Grand Junction to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from Mesa County.
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – Robert Scott of Pagosa Springs to serve as a non-attorney and a Republican from the Third Congressional District; James Carpenter of Englewood to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat from the Sixth Congressional District; and Connie McArthur of Denver to serve as a non-attorney and a Democrat at-large member.

Application Period Open for Vacancies on Supreme Court Nominating Commission and Various Judicial District Nominating Commissions

On Wednesday, September 11, 2013, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced vacancies on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission and the nominating commissions for 16 of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts. Twenty-nine vacancies were announced, and applications for these vacancies are due by 5 p.m. on October 11, 2013. Application forms for attorneys are available on the State Judicial website; applications for non-attorneys are available on the Governor’s Office website. All members of nominating commissions serve as volunteers.

Each judicial district nominating commission is comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys, no more than half of which plus one can share political party affiliation. Additionally, at least one member of each commission must reside in each county in the judicial district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district for whose nominating commission they seek appointment.

The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is comprised of seven attorneys and seven non-attorneys, plus one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven congressional districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney.

The nominating commissions with vacancies are listed here. Specifications as to residency, party affiliation, or whether the vacancy is for an attorney or non-attorney are listed as applicable.

  • First Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Second Judicial District – one attorney
  • Fourth Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Sixth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Ninth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Tenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney
  • Twelfth Judicial District – one attorney; must reside in Alamosa County
  • Thirteenth Judicial District – one attorney and one non-attorney; one must reside in Washington County and one must reside in Morgan County
  • Fifteenth Judicial District – one non-attorney
  • Sixteenth Judicial District – two non-attorneys; one must reside in Crowley County
  • Seventeenth Judicial District – two attorneys
  • Eighteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Nineteenth Judicial District – one attorney
  • Twentieth Judicial District  – one non-attorney
  • Twenty-First Judicial District – two attorneys and one non-attorney
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District – one attorney; must not be a registered Republican
  • Supreme Court Nominating Commission – two attorneys and three non-attorneys; one attorney must be from the First Congressional District and the other must be from the Sixth Congressional District; one non-attorney must be from the Third Congressional District, one must be from the Sixth Congressional District, and the third is the at-large position.

For more information on the vacancies, click here. For information about nominating commissions, click here.

William Herringer Appointed to Sixth Judicial District Court Bench

On Thursday, March 14, 2013, Governor John Hickenlooper appointed William Herringer to the bench of the Sixth Judicial District Court, effective March 11, 2013. He will replace Hon. David L. Dickinson, whose retirement was effective February 28, 2013.

Prior to his appointment, Herringer was an attorney in private practice at Greenberg & Herringer, LLC, in Durango. He primarily focused on criminal defense, but also handled personal injury cases and protection order hearings. He earned his law degree from University of Colorado Law School, and his undergraduate degree from Colorado College.

Judge Herringer’s appointment will be effective for two years, at which time he will face a retention election. If retained, he will remain on the bench for an additional six years.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to the judicial nominating commissions for the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Second judicial districts.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that selects nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies. The nominating commissions are comprised of  seven citizens residing in that judicial district. No more than four members can be from the same political party, and there must be at least one voting member from each county in the district. The members serve six-year terms.

For a complete list of the appointed members and information regarding their residence, affiliation, and the duration of their terms, click here or visit the governor’s website. Information about the judicial nominating commissions and an application for consideration for appointment may be found here.

Suzanne Carlson Appointed as Sixth Judicial District Court Judge

On Friday, June 29, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced his appointment of Suzanne Carlson to serve as a district court judge in the Sixth Judicial District, which covers La Plata, Archuleta, and San Juan counties. Carlson will fill the judgeship created pursuant to HB12-1073. Her judicial appointment is effective July 1.

Carlson has served as a judge for the Southern Ute Indian Tribe since 2005. She currently practices at the law firm of Lisa Ward LLC with a focus on divorce and child custody matters. Previously, she practiced with the Deputy State Public Defender and has served as a Legal Research Attorney for the Sixth Judicial District.

Carlson earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Colorado and her law degree from the University of Colorado Law School.

Finalists Selected to Fill Judgeship on Sixth Judicial District Court

The Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission has nominated three candidates for a district court judgeship created by the passage of HB 12-1073, effective July 1, 2012.

The nominees for the bench are Suzanne Carlson, James Casey, and Martha Minot, all of Durango. All candidates were selected by the commission on June 12.

Under the Colorado Constitution, Governor Hickenlooper has until June 28 to appoint one of the nominees as District Court Judge for the Sixth Judicial District, which serves Archuleta, La Plata, and San Juan counties.

Governor Hickenlooper Appoints More to Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Tuesday, May 29, 2012, Governor John Hickenlooper announced several Board and Commission appointments. The appointments were to the Second, Fifth, Sixth, Twelfth, and Twenty-First Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commissions.

Colorado’s twenty-two judicial districts have judicial district nominating commissions that select nominees for district and county judicial vacancies. Each district nominating commission is chaired by a justice of the Supreme Court, who is a non-voting member of the commission.

Commission members serve six-year terms. Non-lawyers, who are the majority of every nominating commission, are appointed by the governor. Lawyer members are appointed by joint action of the governor, attorney general, and chief justice.

The members appointed to the Second Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Larry Allen Nelsen of Denver, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Denver County.
  • Andrew Dean Schneider of Denver, to serve as a non-attorney and as an Unaffiliated from Denver County.

The members appointed to the Fifth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Gregory V. Johnson of Edwards, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Eagle County.
  • Heather N. Scanlon of Leadville, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from Lake County.

The member appointed to the Sixth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • Stephen C. Fearn of Silverton, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Democrat from San Juan County.

The member appointed to the Twelfth Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for a term expiring December 31, 2017, is:

  • Marvin K. “Zeke” Ward of Creede, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mineral County.

The members appointed to the Twenty-First Judicial District Judicial Nominating Commission for terms expiring December 31, 2017, are:

  • Ivan Daniel Geer of Grand Junction, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mesa County.
  • Beverly Jean Sewell of Grand Junction, to serve as a non-attorney and as a Republican from Mesa County.

New District Court Judgeship Created in the Sixth Judicial District

The Sixth Judicial District Nominating Commission will meet on Tuesday, June 12, 2012, to interview and select nominees for appointment by Governor Hickenlooper to the office of District Judge for the Sixth Judicial District, which serves Archuleta, La Plata, and San Juan counties. The new district court judgeship was created pursuant to HB 12-1073 and is effective July 1.

Eligible applicants for appointment to fill the vacancy must be qualified electors of the Sixth Judicial District and must have been admitted to the practice of law in Colorado for five years. Applications must be received by Thursday, May 24. The appointed district court judge will serve an initial provisional term of two years before facing a retention election. Retained judges serve six-year terms.

Further information about applying for the vacancy is available here from the Colorado Judicial Branch.