June 19, 2019

Hon. Christine Carney to Resign from Larimer County Court; Nominating Commission Seeking Applications

On Friday, October 25, 2013, the Colorado State Judicial Branch announced an opening on the Larimer County Court bench, effective December 31, 2013. The vacancy will be created by the resignation of Hon. Christine A. Carney.

Judge Carney was appointed to the Larimer County Court in 1998, after approximately 17 years of practicing law. She received her undergraduate degree from Michigan State University and her J.D. from the University of Colorado. She is currently the Presiding Judge for the Larimer County Court. She hears civil cases with a jurisdictional limit of $15,000 and criminal cases involving traffic matters and misdemeanors.

Applicants for the vacancy must be qualified electors of Larimer County and must have been admitted to practice law in Colorado for five years. Application forms may be obtained from the ex officio chair of the nominating commission, Justice Gregory Hobbs, or may be downloaded from the State Judicial website. The original signed application and an identical PDF must be filed with the ex officio chair no later than 4 p.m. on November 18. Anyone wishing to nominate another person for the vacancy must submit the nomination no later than 4 p.m. on November 12. The nominating commission will meet on December 6, 2013, to select nominees.

Contact information for members of the nominating commission may be found on the State Judicial website.

Eighth Judicial District Phone Numbers Will Change August 9, 2013

The Eighth Judicial District, which includes Jackson County and Larimer County, announced that all of its phone numbers will be changing on August 9, 2013. The phone numbers to change include the district court, county court, Loveland County Court, clerk of court, court administration, and all probation department locations.

The changes will be effective at 12:00 a.m. on Friday, August 9, 2013. The new numbers are listed below.

  • Clerk of Court main number Larimer County Justice Center – 970-494-3500.
  • Jury Commissioner – 970-494-3555.
  • Probation Larimer County Justice Center – 970-494-3900.
  • Probation Midpoint Office – 970-494-3960.
  • Loveland County Court main number – 970-622-2100.
  • Probation Loveland Police and Courts – 970-622-2150.
  • Probation Loveland 6th Street – 970-622-2180.

For more information, visit the webpage of the Eighth Judicial District or click here.

Nominees Selected for Judgeship in Larimer County Court

The Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission met on April 10, 2013, to select nominees for a judgeship in the Larimer County Court in the Eighth Judicial District. The vacancy was created by the resignation of Hon. Ronald L. Schultz, effective April 30, 2013.

The three nominees are David Ayraud of Fort Collins, Mary Berenato of Fort Collins, and Kraig Ecton of Fort Collins. Under the Colorado Constitution, the governor has 15 days from April 11, 2013 to appoint one of the nominees. Comments about any of the nominees may be submitted to the governor via email at judicial.appointments@state.co.us.

For the full press release, including contact information for the nominees, click here.

Governor Hickenlooper Announces Appointments to Several Judicial Nominating Commissions

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, Governor Hickenlooper announced appointments to the judicial nominating commissions for the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Twenty-Second judicial districts.

Each of Colorado’s 22 judicial districts has a nominating commission that selects nominees for appointment to judicial vacancies. The nominating commissions are comprised of  seven citizens residing in that judicial district. No more than four members can be from the same political party, and there must be at least one voting member from each county in the district. The members serve six-year terms.

For a complete list of the appointed members and information regarding their residence, affiliation, and the duration of their terms, click here or visit the governor’s website. Information about the judicial nominating commissions and an application for consideration for appointment may be found here.

ICCES Implementation Delayed in 8th Judicial District

The implementation of the pilot transition to the Integrated Colorado Courts E-Filing System (ICCES) has been delayed in the 8th Judicial District, which encompasses Larimer and Jackson counties. Originally scheduled for December 3rd, the ICCES pilot program will now begin there on December 19th. All electronic case filing must be done through ICCES once a pilot district goes live. ICCES has already begun in the 14th, 17th, and 20th Judicial Districts, and will go statewide January 1, 2013. For more information on ICCES, go to the State Court Administrator’s Office website.

2011 Judicial Branch Awards Received by 1st, 7th, 8th, 16th, 17th, and 18th Judicial Districts

Several Judicial Branch Awards for 2011 were announced on Monday, June 11, 2012:

  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch Team of the Year award went to the Eighth Judicial District Juvenile Probation Unit;
  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch Manager of the Year award went to David Book, a probation supervisor in La Junta in the Sixteenth Judicial District;
  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch Court Employee of the Year award went to Jenni Turnidge, managing court interpreter for the Eighteenth Judicial District;
  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch State Court Administrator’s Office Employee of the Year award went to Emy López;
  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch Judicial Officer of the Year award went to the Honorable Sandra K. Miller, Delta County Court Judge; and
  • The 2011 Colorado Judicial Branch Probation Employee of the Year award went to Judy Sanger, a probation officer who works with juveniles in the First Judicial District.

The Colorado Judicial Branch annually recognizes a handful of outstanding employees for exemplary work contributing to the high quality of service provided throughout the state’s twenty-two judicial districts.

Nominating the Juvenile Probation team were numerous professionals involved in juvenile justice and rehabilitation throughout the Eighth Judicial District, which serves Jackson and Larimer counties.

Members of the Eighth Judicial District Probation Team are Francesca Arruzza-Obrien, Lori Bragg, Denise Cosgrove, Moriah Eisert, Courtney Gailey, Paula Gates, Tom Harbaugh, Tonya Hertz, Lawrence Hollier, Dirk Kettlekamp, Jessica Link, Mandi Lozano, Scott Newbold, Trevor Quinlivan, Tracy Stromberg, Dixie Vogel, Gordon Walker, and Carol Wright.

Book was nominated for the award by Sixteenth Judicial District Chief Probation Officer Tobin Wright, Chief Judge Jon Kolomitz, other members of the probation department, and Joseph Carrica III, assistant executive director for the Southeast Behavioral Health Group.

Turnidge was nominated for the award by twenty-two district and county court judges and magistrates serving the Eighteenth Judicial District. The judicial officers nominated Turnidge because she exemplifies the dedication and devotion to the Judicial Branch to which all Judicial employees should aspire.

López was nominated for the award by Colleen Kent, managing court interpreter for the Seventeenth Judicial District.

Judge Miller was nominated for the award by Pamela Bliss, volunteer coordinator with Meth Free Delta County, and Seventh Judicial District Probation Officer Juan P. Gallegos.

Sanger was nominated for the award by several judges, a prosecutor, and others involved with the Jefferson County Mental Health Court, where she was the first supervising probation officer.

The Colorado Judicial Branch includes the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, as well as the state’s district and county trial courts.  The branch is also home to the Department of Probation Services, which employs more than 1,100 people including approximately 900 probation supervisors and officers.  The department’s officers are responsible for supervising more than 6,000 juvenile offenders and more than 54,000 adult offenders.

As of July 1, 2011, the Colorado Judicial Branch employed approximately 3,400 employees, which includes 374 justices, judges, and magistrates. In fiscal year 2011, the latest for which full statistics are available, there were 505,265 cases filed statewide at the County Court level, 246, 728 filed in District Court, 2,742 in the Court of Appeals and 1,387 in the Supreme Court.  There were an additional 956 cases filed in the Water Courts.

Application Period Open for Forty-Five Vacancies on Judicial Nominating Commissions

On behalf of Governor John Hickenlooper, Attorney General John Suthers, and Chief Justice Michael L. Bender, the Colorado Judicial Branch announced on Thursday, September 15, 2011, the opening of the application period for forty-five vacancies on judicial nominating commissions across the state.

Some positions are open now, but the majority of vacancies will occur when current commissioners’ six-year terms end December 31, 2011. All commissioners serve as volunteers. Applications are due on or before October 14.

Thirty-two vacancies must be filled by non-attorneys selected by the Governor. Thirteen vacancies must be filled by attorneys selected by joint action of the Governor, Attorney General, and Chief Justice. Vacancies will occur in twenty judicial district nominating commissions.

Each judicial district in Colorado has a nominating commission comprised of three attorneys and four non-attorneys who are tasked with selecting nominees for appointment to county and district judgeships. The Supreme Court Nominating Commission is made up of seven attorneys, seven non-attorneys, and one non-attorney at-large member. Each of Colorado’s seven Congressional Districts is represented by one attorney and one non-attorney on the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, which selects nominees for positions on the Supreme Court and Court of Appeals.

Application forms for vacancies on the various commissions can be found here. Completed application forms should be mailed to Romaine Pacheco, Governor’s Office of Boards and Commissions, 136 State Capitol Bldg., Denver, Colorado 80203.  They also can be faxed to (303) 866-6368 or sent by e-mail to boards@state.co.us.

Article VI, Section 24 of the Colorado Constitution requires that for any nominating commission, “no more than one-half of the commission members plus one, exclusive of the Supreme Court justice serving as ex officio chair, shall be members of the same political party.” The Constitution also requires that at least one commissioner reside in each of the counties of the district. Applicants must reside in the judicial district – or, for the Supreme Court Nominating Commission, the congressional district – to which they are applying for appointment.

Here is a list of upcoming nominating commission attorney vacancies along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • First Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have two non-attorney vacancies. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Seventh Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must reside in Ouray County.
  • Ninth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one non-attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have three non-attorney vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Sixteenth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Supreme Court: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of the Fifth Congressional District.

Here is a list of non-attorney vacancies, along with any applicable residency and political-affiliation requirements:

  • Second Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Third Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fourth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. Only one position may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Fifth Judicial District: Two vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of Eagle County, one other by a resident of Lake County.
  • Sixth Judicial District: One vacancy. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One of the positions must be filled by a resident of San Juan County.
  • Eighth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must not be a registered Democrat.
  • Ninth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. At least one appointee must be a resident of Rio Blanco County and one a resident of Pitkin County.
  • Tenth Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither may be filled by a registered Democrat.
  • Eleventh Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twelfth Judicial District: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of Mineral County and one a resident of Costilla County.
  • Thirteenth Judicial District: Three vacancies. This commission also will have one attorney vacancy. One appointee must be a resident of Yuma County, one a resident of Phillips County, one a resident of Sedgwick County, and one a resident of Logan County.
  • Fourteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Fifteenth Judicial District: Two vacancies.
  • Nineteenth Judicial District: One vacancy.
  • Twentieth Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee cannot be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-First Judicial District: Two vacancies. Neither appointee may be a registered Democrat.
  • Twenty-Second Judicial District: One vacancy. Appointee must be a resident of Dolores County.
  • Supreme Court: Two vacancies. One appointee must be a resident of the Second Congressional District and the other a resident of the Seventh Congressional District.

Click here to read the full release about the commission vacancies from State Judicial.

Carolyn Pannell Named as New District Court Magistrate for Larimer County

On Monday, August 15, 2011, Chief Judge Stephen Schapanski announced that he has selected Carolyn Pannell to join the Eighth Judicial District as a district court magistrate for Larimer County. Pannell will replace the Honorable Susan J. Winfield, whose retirement is effective October 1, 2011.

Since March of 2009, Pannell has been a staff attorney with the Bringing Justice Home Project, which provides legal representation to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking in Larimer, Weld, Routt, Grand, and Moffat counties. Previously, she was a solo family law practitioner in Fort Collins. Pannell earned her law degree from the University of Florida.

Pannell will take the bench on October 3, 2011. Her docket will be a mix of dependency and neglect, child support enforcement, and contempt hearings in family and juvenile cases.

Click here to read the full press release from State Judicial regarding the appointment of Carolyn Pannell.

Finalists Selected to Fill Magistrate Vacancy in Larimer County District Court

The Eighth Judicial District Nominating Commission has nominated three candidates for an open magistrate position in Larimer County.

Nominees for the bench are David Ayraud and Carolyn Pannell, both of Fort Collins, and Holly Panetta, of Severance. All finalists were selected in a meeting at the Larimer County Courthouse on July 21, 2011.

Eighth Judicial District Court Chief Judge Stephen Schapanski will make the final decision on which candidate to appoint, but is asking for public input on the candidates.

Comments regarding any of the nominees may be sent to Eighth Judicial District Administrator Janelle Brunin via e-mail or by mail sent to her attention at 201 LaPorte Avenue, Suite 100, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521.  Public comment on the nominees will be taken until Friday, August 5, 2011 at 5:00 pm.

A complete job description for a magistrate employed by the Colorado Judicial Department is posted here.

Eighth Judicial District’s Adult Drug Court Celebrating National Drug Court Month: A Proven Budget Solution

The Denver Drug Court isn’t the only problem-solving court in Colorado celebrating National Drug Court Month. This month, the Eighth Judicial District Adult Drug Court is also recognizing the 162 people who have graduated from the program since it began a decade ago.

District Court Judge Daniel J. Kaup presides over the court in Larimer County, where programs identify substance abusers in the criminal justice system. Participants are held accountable through an integrated supervision program designed to address substance abuse issues through treatment and rehabilitation. Judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, probation officers, treatment providers, and court staff work collaboratively to enforce compliance with court orders through a system of graduated rewards and sanctions. Accordingly, frequent court appearances before a sitting judge is an important factor for success in the program.

The program currently has sixty-three participants and has successfully graduated 162 people in the last decade. Locally, 93% of drug court graduates are not charged with a new felony or misdemeanor within a year after their graduation; 80% have not been charged with a new felony or misdemeanor within three years of graduating.

In addition to the Adult Drug Court, Larimer County began a DUI Court in July 2010, and is also home to a Juvenile Drug Court Program, a Family Treatment Court, and Colorado State University administers a Campus Court.

In honor of National Drug Court Month, the national focus is on the monumental societal and economic benefits of Drug Courts. At a time when local, state, and federal budgets are stretched, Drug Courts are highlighting their programs as effective tools for reducing substance abuse and crime and improving safety, and as more cost effective than straight incarceration. More information on the success of Drug Courts and National Drug Court Month can be found at the National Association of Drug Court Professionals website.

Find us on Facebook!

www.facebook.com/ColoradoBarAssociation

Eighth and Fourteenth Judicial Districts Seeking Attorneys to Represent Indigent Respondent Parents and Mental Health Patients

The Eighth and Fourteenth Judicial Districts are seeking qualified attorneys to provide legal counsel for indigent respondent parents in dependency and neglect actions and indigent respondents in mental health cases. Basic contract fees and compensation are offered for each appointment in the coming fiscal year (July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012).

For those interested in seeking appointment to such cases, the new information and application materials can be found at the Eighth Judicial District and Fourteenth Judicial District websites, or below.

8th Judicial District

14th Judicial District

Six New Judges Appointed to Colorado District and County Courts

Last month, Governor Bill Ritter announced the appointments of six new county and district court judges:

  • John Joseph Briggs of Windsor will become a new Weld County Court judge, effective January 1, 2011. Briggs has been an associate attorney in the Law Office of Robert E. Ray since 2004. His practice focuses on criminal law, domestic relations, and appeals. He also worked as a law clerk for the Kansas Court of Appeals. He received his law degree from Washburn Law School in 1993.
  • Francis Stephen Collins of Parker will become a new District Court judge in the 18th Judicial District (Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties), effective February 1, 2011. He is currently a shareholder at Ducker, Montgomery, Lewis & Bess, P.C., where he has practiced since 2000 and is now a commercial litigator. Prior to that, he was an associate and partner with Pendleton, Friedberg, Wilson & Hennessey; an associate with Parcel, Meyer, Schwartz, Ruttum & Mauro; and a law clerk to the Alaska Supreme Court Justice Edmond W. Burke. Collins received his law degree from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, in 1979.
  • Julie Kunce Field of Fort Collins will become a new District Court judge in the 8th Judicial District (Jackson and Larimer counties), effective January 1, 2011. Field is currently a sole practitioner. She previously worked as a litigation associate with Nutter, McClennen and Fish; associate professor and clinic director of Washburn University Law School; clinical program director for the University of Denver College of Law; adjunct faculty and guest lecturer for the University of Colorado-Denver Masters’ Program in Public Policy; and as a special consultant to International Monetary Fund and World Bank. She earned her law degree from the University of Chicago in 1985.
  • Debra Marie Gunkel of Springfield will become a new Baca County Court judge, effective January 11, 2011. She is currently a sole practitioner. She previously worked as a deputy district attorney in the 16th Judicial District Attorney’s Office. She earned her J.D. from Southwestern University in 1989, and an LLM in taxation from Boston University in 1991.
  • Stephen Enderlin Howard of Fort Collins will become a new District Court judge in the 8th Judicial District, effective January 1, 2011. He is currently a partner at Howard and Francis. He previously worked at Fischer and Wilmarth as an associate and a partner. He earned his law degree from the University of Colorado School of Law in 1978.
  • Cindy Lu Wilson of Coalmont will become a new Jackson County Court judge, effective February 9, 2011. She is currently a certified public accountant with her own practice. She previously was the owner/operator of the Shamrock Ranch and she was a CPA with Tredway, Henion and Kerr and with Wilson & Co.

District court judges serve an initial provisional term of two years. Then, if retained by voters, they serve six-year terms.

County court judges serve an initial provisional term of two years. Then, if retained by voters, they serve four-year terms.