May 19, 2019

Colorado Supreme Court: Consent to Search Truck Was Valid so Suppression Unnecessary

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Chavez-Barragan on Monday, September 26, 2016.

Fourth Amendment—Traffic Stops—Reasonableness of Investigatory Detention—Voluntariness of Consent to Search.

The Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s order suppressing drugs found in defendant’s truck and defendant’s incriminating statements made to police after they discovered the drugs. Defendant was pulled over for a traffic violation and detained after he consented to a police search of his truck. The Supreme Court concluded that this investigatory detention, which resulted from defendant’s authorization of the search, was reasonable. After considering the totality of the circumstances, the Court also concluded that defendant’s consent to the search was voluntary and the search was lawful. Accordingly, the Court determined that no prior illegality tainted defendant’s incriminating statements. Therefore, neither the drugs nor the statements should have been suppressed.

Summary provided courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Totality of Circumstances Instructive in Determining Voluntariness of Consent to Search

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Munoz-Gutierrez on Monday, February 9, 2015.

Suppression of Evidence—Voluntariness and Coercion.

In this interlocutory appeal, the People sought review of the trial court’s order suppressing marijuana that the police discovered in a car registered to and driven by defendant. The trial court found that the People did not establish that defendant voluntarily consented to the search of his car. The Supreme Court determined that the trial court applied the wrong standard and held that defendant voluntarily consented to the search when he gave oral consent. Under the totality of the circumstances, the police’s conduct did not overbear defendant’s exercise of free will. Specifically, it was not sufficiently coercive or deceptive to a person with defendant’s characteristics in his circumstances. Accordingly, the Court reversed the trial court’s suppression order and remanded the matter to the trial court.

Summary and full case available here, courtesy of The Colorado Lawyer.

Colorado Supreme Court: Where Home is Occupied by Two People, Only One Needs to Consent to Search

The Colorado Supreme Court issued its opinion in People v. Fuerst on Monday, May 20, 2013.

Suppression of Evidence—Consent to Search.

The Supreme Court held that respondent Kim Maurice Fuerst’s decision to silently remain behind a locked door inside his home did not constitute an express refusal of consent to a police search. Therefore, Fuerst’s wife’s free and voluntary consent to the search of the couple’s home was valid as to Fuerst. The trial court’s order granting Fuerst’s motion to suppress evidence obtained during the search was reversed.

Summary and full case available here.